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Forum topic by shimo posted 08-02-2020 04:11 PM 482 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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shimo

8 posts in 49 days


08-02-2020 04:11 PM

Hello all and thanks in advance for any suggestions.

I’ve recently gotten interested in woodworking but I have no experience. For the sake of keeping me and those around me safe I’m reaching out for suggestions for getting my table and space set up within my budget.

For my table, I recently purchased a used Greenlee 24X48 tool storage box on casters and 2 solid core doors that are 36X84. My plan was to trim the doors down to 30X72 which eliminates the hardware. The doors are at least 80lbs each so I’m not sure that the 2 of them stacked is going to be feasible if I want to use the Greenlee for storage.

1. How much overlap should the top have (width and depth) beyond the metal table for vises, clamps etc.?
2. Is one solid door enough or should I stack the 2 for a 3 1/2” thick top?
3. With the casters and a single door the height of the table will be 33”. I’m 6’6” so that puts it about 4 inches below my waist. Is there a standard height that is recommended?
4. I’ve picked up a 2HP dust collector from a friend in the filtration business so I think I’m good there.
5. What vises are recommended and how many? One front and one tail vise is what I was planning.
6. How should I attach the door to the top of the Greenlee?

My plan it to make floating shelves with grooves for LED strip lighting, pull out storage units for albums like the old Lane stuff, dining chairs and maybe some furniture and cabinets. So far I have the following tools but would welcome any suggestions for must have tools or accessories.

1. PC biscuit joiner
2. PC router. I don’t have a router table yet.
3. Milwaukee corded circular saw
4. Older very basic Dewalt miter saw.
5. 18v reciprocating saw, oscillating tool, a couple of drills.
6. Old Hilti hammer drill.
7. Kreg pocket hole jig and rip-cut i picked up cheap on Craigslist.
8. I’ve picked up a dozen or so 3” C-Clamps, a variety of trigger clamps and some homemade stuff up to 48”.

As of yet I do not have a table saw, planar, jointer, jigsaw or bandsaw. Trying to find some used stuff but also good quality if you have some recommendations.

Anything suggestions are appreciated and sorry if I came to the wrong place with these questions.


16 replies so far

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1604 posts in 1436 days


#1 posted 08-03-2020 12:27 PM

If you’re planning on hand carving I wouldn’t put it wheels nor would I have as much overhang as your idea has (1’ on either end).

Counter tops are generally 36”, so you’re low to start. Since you’re 6’6”, I would add 4”-6” to that. 36” counters are right for 5’9” average height. You’re 9” over that, so 1/2 of 9” is 4”-5”. So ideally a standing counter for you should be around 40”.

Shelves and cabinets are easy with the right gear in a small shop. Dining room chairs and furniture not so much. Good ambitious plans there, don’t get frustrated if it’s a tougher process than it seems.

Drill press is not on your list.

Carbide blades and cutters for everything!

You might want to add some measuring tools like a folding rule or an Incra marking square.

Sanders. You’ll need several, ROS (at least two to avoid changing grits all the time), OSS, belt sander, etc. Ditto with routers, one is never enough.

You a hand tool guy? No? Well you’ll need a spoke shave to make chair seats.

Start making stuff, anything. When you’re stuck for a tool buy a cheap one. If it lasts, great. If it doesn’t, buy better. Repeat until you get one that doesn’t fail you.

For a TS though, buy the best (within reason) you can afford. Remember too that the fence is the better part of a good saw. An inexpensive saw with a good fence will generally out-cut a better saw with a cheap fence.

Take your time, have fun, and over all, BE SAFE!

Remember the woodworkers secret handshake, raise hands over head, wiggle fingers and say: ”I’m a woodworker and I have all ten!”

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View shimo's profile

shimo

8 posts in 49 days


#2 posted 08-03-2020 12:33 PM



If you re planning on hand carving I wouldn t put it wheels nor would I have as much overhang as your idea has (1 on either end).

Counter tops are generally 36”, so you re low to start. Since you re 6 6”, I would add 4”-6” to that. 36” counters are right for 5 9” average height. You re 9” over that, so 1/2 of 9” is 4”-5”. So ideally a standing counter for you should be around 40”.

Shelves and cabinets are easy with the right gear in a small shop. Dining room chairs and furniture not so much. Good ambitious plans there, don t get frustrated if it s a tougher process than it seems.

Drill press is not on your list.

Carbide blades and cutters for everything!

You might want to add some measuring tools like a folding rule or an Incra marking square.

Sanders. You ll need several, ROS (at least two to avoid changing grits all the time), OSS, belt sander, etc. Ditto with routers, one is never enough.

You a hand tool guy? No? Well you ll need a spoke shave to make chair seats.

Start making stuff, anything. When you re stuck for a tool buy a cheap one. If it lasts, great. If it doesn t, buy better. Repeat until you get one that doesn t fail you.

For a TS though, buy the best (within reason) you can afford. Remember too that the fence is the better part of a good saw. An inexpensive saw with a good fence will generally out-cut a better saw with a cheap fence.

Take your time, have fun, and over all, BE SAFE!

Remember the woodworkers secret handshake, raise hands over head, wiggle fingers and say: ”I m a woodworker and I have all ten!”

- Madmark2


View shimo's profile

shimo

8 posts in 49 days


#3 posted 08-03-2020 01:03 PM

Wow! A ton of great information. The height recommendation has helped me come up with an idea for securing the door to the base. Thx!.

I wasn’t planning on doing much by hand (yet) and I have to keep the table mobile to pull it out of my garage into my carport for use. I’ve made my dust collector mobile as well so it shouldn’t take me too much time for setup. The casters have locking wheels but I’m looking at some other ways to insure stability.

Incra marking square. Didn’t know that existed and man I could have used that about a hundred times in the last 5 years. Just ordered on from Amazon.

I do have an ROS and a 3×21 belt sander. Will have to pick up an OSS and a couple of backups.

I do have a cheap 2nd router and I lucked out and found a 24X48 butcher block with over a 100 router bits at a garage sale. Most still have the wax on them and they appear to be high quality. Hiltex, Freud and Bosch.

The plans I got for dining room chairs appear to have a flat surface for the seat but I like the idea of making something more comfortable and higher quality. I like the idea of practicing with a spoke shave. thx.

I’ll be on the lookout for a high quality fence to go along with the table I find.

Thanks for all of your feedback. Huge help in making decisions how to move forward. Thanks for taking the time!

Scott

View Rich1955's profile

Rich1955

145 posts in 238 days


#4 posted 08-03-2020 01:07 PM

I would first purchase measuring and marking tools, for me, good quality 6” and 12” steel rulers are what I use most.
A high quality combo square is also valuable, 6” is my go to. Then I would start making things and see what you need to purchase, this way you won’t be wasting money on things you think you need only to find out later your not using it. Tool stores are like candy stores to a kid. Have fun in the shop and always be safe with your tools.

-- Rich

View shimo's profile

shimo

8 posts in 49 days


#5 posted 08-03-2020 01:17 PM

Thanks Rich. Some more things that I need to add and you’re right, tool shopping is addictive. I did decide to make a CD rack first. I need one and it seems to be about the easiest thing I could do, unless I decide to cut grooves out for the CD’s instead of getting the plastic inserts. Thanks for the advice!

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1604 posts in 1436 days


#6 posted 08-03-2020 01:26 PM

The Incra marking rules double as squares.

Welcome to LJ’s.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Robert's profile

Robert

3932 posts in 2328 days


#7 posted 08-03-2020 02:33 PM

Watch the Paul Sellers video on building a plywood workbench.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View shimo's profile

shimo

8 posts in 49 days


#8 posted 08-03-2020 02:38 PM

Thanks Mark and Robert. I’ll check out the video.

View Karda's profile

Karda

2443 posts in 1401 days


#9 posted 08-06-2020 06:12 PM

do you get you tube if not get it there is alot of information there check wot the effort he has a series of videos just for the beginer and he explain what tools to get first and how to use them, i am a beginer myself and don’t know what I would do without utube and this forum. Remember the best tool you will ever own is between your ears

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

414 posts in 603 days


#10 posted 08-06-2020 07:23 PM

I would not mount a workbench bench top to the top of a top-opening tool box. That would be very aggravating when (not if) you have a lot of tools/materials on your bench top, and you need another tool from the box.

You might consider making a bench that has legs/ends that rest on the floor, and spans the tool box, so you can roll the box out from under the bench to access its contents. Or roll the bench out and away from the chest for use. The only problem with these solutions might be making the bench resist racking lengthwise, since it would have only one length-wise stretcher between the ends.

-- Andy - Arlington TX

View shimo's profile

shimo

8 posts in 49 days


#11 posted 08-07-2020 02:11 AM

Thanks for the info Karda and Andy.

I’ve already attached the door to the Greenlee chest and I’m fine with the setup. I put some blocking on the ends of the chest to increase the height of the table and that left me with and opening between the top of the chest and the bench top which worked out for clamp storage. Most items stored in the chest are rarely used but the main purpose for the Greenlee is portability.

View MPython's profile

MPython

298 posts in 660 days


#12 posted 08-07-2020 11:53 AM

To expand a little on what Rich said, I suggest that you avoid buying “sets” of tools – chisels, screwdrivers, router bits, etc. Sets almost always include items you will seldom, if ever, use. Those cost money and add to the cost of the set. For the same money you can buy better quality tools that you’ll actually use if you buy them individually, as you need them. An exception, any least in my mind, would be a basic set of twist drill bits. When you get into it, you’ll probably want to start acquiring higher quality bits. That’s the time to start buying good bits one or two at a time, as you need them. Soon you’ll have a quality set without experiencing the pain of laying out big bucks to buy them all at once. Meanwhile, you can punch a hole in most stuff with a cheap bit from your basic set.

View shimo's profile

shimo

8 posts in 49 days


#13 posted 08-07-2020 11:36 PM

Thnkas MP. Good advice and I’ll certainly go the route of buying based on need.


To expand a little on what Rich said, I suggest that you avoid buying “sets” of tools – chisels, screwdrivers, router bits, etc. Sets almost always include items you will seldom, if ever, use. Those cost money and add to the cost of the set. For the same money you can buy better quality tools that you ll actually use if you buy them individually, as you need them. An exception, any least in my mind, would be a basic set of twist drill bits. When you get into it, you ll probably want to start acquiring higher quality bits. That s the time to start buying good bits one or two at a time, as you need them. Soon you ll have a quality set without experiencing the pain of laying out big bucks to buy them all at once. Meanwhile, you can punch a hole in most stuff with a cheap bit from your basic set.

- MPython


View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1120 posts in 758 days


#14 posted 08-08-2020 05:53 AM

You don’t need expensive tools to start your hobby. Long time ago I started with a jig saw, circular saw, router, small router table, 3”x24” belt sander, chisels, hand saws, squares, small block plane, rasps & files, drill, hammer, 5” bench vise, 5” bench grinder and sand paper. Yep, just the basics. Was able to build what I wanted with them. Got by nicely as a occasional hobby. I do suggest to purchase the tools and equipment as you go, instead all at once. Planning your purchases to what your building. Less apt to buy something you don’t need this way.

I’d put a table saw on the list before the planer, jointer, miter saw or bandsaw. Some may saw the bandsaw, but it’s more difficult to cut sheets of plywood or square up jointed panels on the bandsaw. One way to fit a budget is to get a good used contractors table saw. You can always sell the used contractors saw when you decide to upgrade. Stores like Lowes, Menards, Home Depot sell dimensioned lumber, so the planer and jointer can wait.

You can get free catalogs from many of the ‘woodworking supply stores’. Rockler, Woodcraft, Grizzly, Lee Valley, Peachtree, Klingspor’s Woodworking, etc.. Browse through them, able to compare the many options and tools available. You can also get on their email list for monthly deals. This would give you some alternative suppliers verse the local hardware stores.

Learn how to sharpen the chisels to get a scary sharp edge. Makes a big difference verses just sharp.

The only battery tools I have is a Drill and flashlights. The corded power tools lasts a long time, the battery operated tools become obsolete when the models change and battery is no longer is available. A lot a people like the battery tools for convenience, but down the pike, they’ll need replacing long before the corded tools.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1120 posts in 758 days


#15 posted 08-08-2020 06:16 AM

The vises for the workbenches, I have a $25 4” tabletop metal vise on one bench, $21 6” underbench vise next to the drill press https://www.lowes.com/pd/IRWIN-6-1-2-in-Cast-Iron-Woodworkers-Vise/1000235649, And three of these cabinet maker vises (two on one side & one on the opposite side) https://www.grizzly.com/products/Grizzly-Cabinet-Maker-s-Vise/H7788. Works good for me.

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