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Does making filler from sawdust and glue affect finish?

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Forum topic by SMP posted 08-02-2020 03:49 PM 861 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SMP

2476 posts in 758 days


08-02-2020 03:49 PM

I have had glue cause issues with finishing many times over the years. And I have heard of people mixing sawdust with glue to use as filler. But how does this not affect finish? Or is it certain finishes only? FWIW i am making a small walnut box with splines made of african bloodwood. So I can’t find any commercial filler. Will probably finish with either odies or BLO/wax . Would either of these finishes be affected by glue/sawdust putty?


21 replies so far

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

345 posts in 450 days


#1 posted 08-02-2020 04:59 PM

Depending on how messy you are, yes it can. But, my experience has been that it’s usually a discoloration, not really a finish not sticking or causing problems down the line. With dark woods like bloodwood and walnut, it’s not as much of an issue.

I’ve used both wood glue and CA glue. Both will leave a yellower spots on lighter woods, or keep stain from penetrating. But, like I said, darker woods I’m not staining? No issues so far. Medium colored woods like mahagony
can be a crap shoot.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Fred Hargis

6424 posts in 3346 days


#2 posted 08-02-2020 06:02 PM

I’ve not had any good luck trying the sawdust/glue stuff, unless it was on a painted piece. Best to give it a trial shot and see what you think.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Wildwood

2891 posts in 2987 days


#3 posted 08-02-2020 06:44 PM

I have used saw dust, coffee grounds, and herbal teas with CA glue filling small cracks with better success than carpenters glue. Only used these fillers & CA under film finishes.

-- Bill

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MrWolfe

1069 posts in 976 days


#4 posted 08-02-2020 07:04 PM

I’ve used woodfiller or the glue and sawdust but both have had the stain/finish issue.
I’ve thought about using this but I haven’t tried it yet.

Starbond KBL-500 Black Medium Thick, Premium Rubber Toughened CA – Cyanoacrylate Adhesive Super Glue

I think it comes in different colors and viscosities so you can check it out.

Last time I used C.A. glue and a bit of walnut dust from a sander just for that purpose.
I’m alright with some of my stuff looking a little hand touched and imperfect but I try to make tighter joints these days.
Jon

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BUVAVC0/?coliid=I2JY4WHGGKOC0K&colid=RURRF9Z0PSNW&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

I might have to try that black C.A. glue next time

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5819 posts in 2240 days


#5 posted 08-02-2020 08:34 PM

I’ve never had any luck making my own putty from PVA or epoxy and sanding dust, but I have an experiment in progress today on some scraps using both liquid hide glue and fish glue with some doug fir wood flour to see how that works out. Hide glue is good because it doesn’t permanently seal the grain like PVA can. You can easily clean up the glue with water and a scrotch brite pad. The LHG is a little on the dark side so the putty formed is definitely on the dark side which is why I decided to try the fish glue—definitely lighter when wet anyway.

I’ll post some pictures when it dries. I will put some Tried and True Varnish oil (which is a BLO based varnish) afterwards to see how it looks once it has a finish on it.

EDIT: I just went out and took a picture of it wet. I was intentionally sloppy and actually slathered the remaining putty like Bondo on the board to left after filling a hole in the knot.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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SMP

2476 posts in 758 days


#6 posted 08-02-2020 08:59 PM

Interesting, never heard of rubber hardened CA.

I do have liquid hide glue. Maybe I can experiment with that on some scraps.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5886 posts in 1442 days


#7 posted 08-02-2020 09:30 PM

I harp on this all the time, usually with no results, but I’ll give it a go here anyway. Makeshift fillers using glue and wood dust are not what you want to use for your fine woodworking, so take the time to learn to do proper fills and repairs. Mohawk has a full line of products and an extensive library of videos online to show you how to use them.

I’m referring to areas of the project that will be front and center. With practice, you can learn to repair defects, dings and slips of a tool so well that even you won’t be able to find them a few days later.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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SMP

2476 posts in 758 days


#8 posted 08-02-2020 09:40 PM



I harp on this all the time, usually with no results, but I’ll give it a go here anyway. Makeshift fillers using glue and wood dust are not what you want to use for your fine woodworking, so take the time to learn to do proper fills and repairs. Mohawk has a full line of products and an extensive library of videos online to show you how to use them.

I’m referring to areas of the project that will be front and center. With practice, you can learn to repair defects, dings and slips of a tool so well that even you won’t be able to find them a few days later.

- Rich

Interesting, my local wood store has 2 full aisles of all types of mohawk products. I’ve always been intimidated since there is so much and all the cans look alike. And there seems to be soft fill sticks and others you melt etc and various kits. Maybe its time I take my repairs to the next level as this is an anniversary gift.

View Gerald Thompson's profile

Gerald Thompson

1256 posts in 3087 days


#9 posted 08-02-2020 10:11 PM

I’ve used hide glue and sawdust with good results.

-- Jerry

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7658 posts in 4221 days


#10 posted 08-02-2020 11:13 PM

I use Timbermate filler for cracks and grain filler but there are some limitations as Timbermate is water based a water based finish will soften it. I have not been disappointed with Timbermate as yet!

Hide glue works in most cases because it will hide your gaps … that’s a pun guys!

-- "It's fine in practise but it will never work in theory"

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shipwright

8581 posts in 3651 days


#11 posted 08-02-2020 11:39 PM

Hot hide glue and fine dust “mastic” is a standard go to filler in French marquetry. Animal glues dry hard and sandable unlike PVA glues and they don’t block finishes. They can be made almost any colour too. I’ve even made white by using Profil microspheres.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

5886 posts in 1442 days


#12 posted 08-03-2020 12:31 AM


Interesting, my local wood store has 2 full aisles of all types of mohawk products. I’ve always been intimidated since there is so much and all the cans look alike. And there seems to be soft fill sticks and others you melt etc and various kits. Maybe its time I take my repairs to the next level as this is an anniversary gift.

- SMP

Check out the videos. They are excellent sources. For someone just starting out, Mohawk Quick Fill and Hard Fill are the easiest to work with. They do require a heat source to melt them, but they are leveled without the need of a burn-in knife and are quite durable. Their Plane Stick and E Z Flow give the most durable result, but it takes practice. The putty sticks are fine for areas that won’t get any wear, but I rarely use them.

If you have questions, feel free to message me. I think you’ll find it to be a rewarding venture that’ll save your butt many times down the road.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1163 posts in 1955 days


#13 posted 08-03-2020 02:50 AM

I do it fairly frequently but, I like to use epoxy and the finest sanding dust I can create. I do this because the epoxy is nearly clear and by varying the amount of dust I can adjust the color from only a light tint to a very dark color. It works best if you know ahead of time the finished color of your projject. Then experiment with the amount (and species) of dust in the epoxy to match the finished color. I have never had any adhesion problems with any finish over the epoxy.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1022 posts in 1032 days


#14 posted 08-03-2020 02:59 AM

I have never done it, but I bet you could use water based famowood and mix in some transtint to get your color. Maybe start with ceder and add some red?

Might get expensive and you would need to make sure it dries, but I bet you could get a good match.

Edit-they also make walnut filler. Depending on how dark your walnut is, IMO it’s a little dark.

View pottz's profile

pottz

11296 posts in 1837 days


#15 posted 08-03-2020 03:32 AM



I harp on this all the time, usually with no results, but I’ll give it a go here anyway. Makeshift fillers using glue and wood dust are not what you want to use for your fine woodworking, so take the time to learn to do proper fills and repairs. Mohawk has a full line of products and an extensive library of videos online to show you how to use them.

I’m referring to areas of the project that will be front and center. With practice, you can learn to repair defects, dings and slips of a tool so well that even you won’t be able to find them a few days later.

- Rich


totally agree wood dust mixed with glue is gonna stand out like a sore thumb.gotta learn the proper technique like rich talks about or live with second class finish.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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