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Noise reduction by switching from jobsite saw to cabinet saw?

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Forum topic by Magnous posted 08-02-2020 02:40 PM 753 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Magnous

3 posts in 54 days


08-02-2020 02:40 PM

I like to work in my basement workshop when the rest of my family is sleeping. I can use most tools without my wife complaining, including my 6.0 HP Rigid shop vac (WD1450), but I can’t make a single cut with my jobsite tablesaw (Rigid T2400-1) without waking her. I’m thinking of buying a cabinet saw (specifically looking at a Grizzly G1023RLW) in hopes of finally being able to work at night.

I’ve read that the weight, enclosure, and different motor of cabinet saws all add up to reduced noise and vibration. Would getting a cabinet saw like that Grizzly bring my table saw noise down from a jet engine to less than my shop vac?


18 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

7789 posts in 1565 days


#1 posted 08-02-2020 03:12 PM

if your saw now sounds like a jet engine and is louder then shop vac you need to check it out there is something wrong with it IMO there should be very little difference in cabinet saw versus contractor :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Sark

320 posts in 1213 days


#2 posted 08-02-2020 03:18 PM

The portable saws with direct drive use typically use universal motors which are loud and light weight and inexpensive to make. The cabinet saw uses an induction motor with belt drive. These motors are heavy, efficient and quieter.

I read (On a Fine Homemaking tool review) that the noise level on your saw is 95db. The noise on my Delta Unisaw I measured at 75db with a spinning blade. 20db is a huge difference in noise level. Take a look at any of the decibel comparison charts, and you’ll see why your wife is complaining. Difference between a vacuum cleaner and subway train going by? Something like that.

So yes, a cabinet saw will be a lot quieter.

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Madmark2

1630 posts in 1441 days


#3 posted 08-02-2020 03:25 PM

Contractor’s saws usually have the screaming motor hanging off the back where the sound has nowhere to go but up and out. In a cabinet saw the motor is inside the box and the sound, like the sawdust is mostly trapped inside. The sawdust helps absorb sound instead of it having nothing to muffle it.


You can comfortably talk while the saw runs.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8212 posts in 3052 days


#4 posted 08-02-2020 03:46 PM

Like night and day. Your portable jobsite saw has a brushed universal screamer motor in it. If the 95db figure is correct, then that is approx. as loud as the notorious Dewalt lunchbox planer, which almost everyone is familiar with as being the loudest of the bunch and one of its biggest complaints. In other words, it is LOUD.

Even a contractor saw would be a huge reduction in noise. Any machine that has an induction motor will be much quieter, and a belt driven one is usually even more so since there isn’t any gearing to turn. In many cases, such as on my 3hp Unisaw, the noise of the blade spinning is louder than the motor itself. You can see/hear an example in this short 17 second clip on YouTube.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Picken5

320 posts in 3545 days


#5 posted 08-02-2020 03:46 PM

I also have my workshop in half of our basement. While I do have quieter cabinet saw down there (along with other power tools you might expect), I still wanted to do something to mitigate noise. I ended up adding insulation to the ceiling and walls of the half of the basement with my shop. My wife says the only time she can hear anything upstairs from my shop is when I’m running my Dewalt planer (it has a dust ejection system that is pretty loud). Anyway, insulation wasn’t terribly expensive and it helped a ton — especially in the ceiling.

-- Howard - "Time spent making sawdust is not deducted from one's lifetime." - old Scottish proverb

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1540 posts in 2805 days


#6 posted 08-02-2020 03:52 PM



Like night and day. Your portable jobsite saw has a brushed universal screamer motor in it. If the 95db figure is correct, then that is approx. as loud as the notorious Dewalt lunchbox planer, which almost everyone is familiar with as being the loudest of the bunch and one of its biggest complaints. In other words, it is LOUD.

Even a contractor saw would be a huge reduction in noise. Any machine that has an induction motor will be much quieter, and a belt driven one is usually even more so since there isn t any gearing to turn. In many cases, such as on my 3hp Unisaw, the noise of the blade spinning is louder than the motor itself. You can see/hear an example in this short 17 second clip on YouTube.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Nice rock-solid running saw but what is with that table insert? You could lose a two by four down there.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2125 posts in 4151 days


#7 posted 08-02-2020 03:56 PM

I still don’t know if you’ll be able to work in the basement without waking people up upstairs.

Even though cabinet saws are much, much quieter, you still need dust collection, which is likely to be pretty loud.

You might look into doing as much soundproofing as you can (mineral wool insulation in the joist bays above your head, maybe foam panels below that to take the place of drywall/plywood?

Also, some strategic acoustical panels in the workshop itself could go a long way. Look into making your own with old towels or moving blankets – there’s lots of videos on youtube about that.

Anything you can do to cut the noise level is likely to be helpful for those unfortunate souls above your head.

View SMP's profile

SMP

2476 posts in 758 days


#8 posted 08-02-2020 04:09 PM

I have a contractor saw, its. Ot that loud when its running unloaded. The majority of the sound comes from the wood getting cut. The blade and the wood are completely outside of any cabinet so there is not much to do noise wise except maybe get a quieter blade. Also cutting softer woods like pine is quiter than say oak. Or is she even woken by the saw running unloaded? Thats something different but still should be louder when cutting.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1238 posts in 454 days


#9 posted 08-02-2020 04:25 PM

A quieter saw is a start. A two pronged attack would also have you seal any penetrations leading to the floor above, insulating between and door openings. If you have any ductwork between that won’t work either. Lastly there is hat channel to avoid sound transfer via joists. You can also add what we used to call sound suck. It is an 1/8” rubber fabric that we would use to seperate restaurant bar space and apartments and insulating home theater rooms.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1972 posts in 3646 days


#10 posted 08-02-2020 04:41 PM

A contractor saw is quiet compared to the job site saw with that universal motor. The mineral wool is a great sound barrier, but I would cover it with a fire resistant acoustical ceiling tile of some type, which will absorb more noise than foam. Instead of hat channel, there is a type of channel designed for sound abatement, but the proper name escapes me. It is slotted, not solid.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1630 posts in 1441 days


#11 posted 08-02-2020 04:48 PM

You don’t have to run the DC when you have a cabinet saw. You can just let the sawdust pile up in the cabinet and then use the DC to clean it out a few times a year. MUCH easier on both the ears and the electric bill.

The new Grizzly G0889 planer is also much quieter than the DeWalt screamers. And with it’s own dust collection bag, no DC is needed for that either.


My shop inspector, Nicky, sits on the planer next to the dust bag.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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Aj2

3342 posts in 2651 days


#12 posted 08-02-2020 05:10 PM

The blade can make a big difference too.
I find Forrest blades to be quite Freud blades are screamers. Zero clearance throat plates make the blade louder.

-- Aj

View SMP's profile

SMP

2476 posts in 758 days


#13 posted 08-02-2020 07:06 PM



The blade can make a big difference too.
I find Forrest blades to be quite Freud blades are screamers. Zero clearance throat plates make the blade louder.

- Aj2

Also kerf. my cheap Freud diablo thin kerf from Home Depot is probably 5 times louder than my Amana full kerf.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5819 posts in 2240 days


#14 posted 08-02-2020 07:44 PM

When I switched from an old delta contractor’s saw with a universal motor to their new contractor’s saw with an induction motor, the new saw was significantly quieter than the old one. Another thing to check is to see if the bearings are going out. The bearings on the old delta were pretty worn and putting new ones in made a pretty big difference too.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3604 posts in 2347 days


#15 posted 08-02-2020 08:45 PM

Jobsite saw are so noisy, they seem more scary to use. :-0)

A well tuned cabinet saw emits a very quiet hum when it turned on. If it makes noise, it needs new bearings, or belts. If fit on Zero Clearance Insert (ZCI) is too close you might get a ringing vibration, but that is easy to tune and fix.

In my Arizona garage with box fan running, don’t hear hear they TS running, until it is cutting wood. Most of the noise comes when blade touches something.
My family only calls me noisy when I fire up the 20” planer (10K RPM cutter head) or use a router (12-20K RPM), not with heavy cast iron tools like TS or jointer on spinning 5-6K RPM. That and when I turn up 50w shop stereo to jam to classic rock and roll. lol

+1 on saw blade type/design impacts noise level.
Thin kerf blades have higher frequency resonance due thin plate and small carbide teeth, which makes them screamers. I find TK blades like Freud/Diablo with laser cut vibration stabilizer features make most noise. Tenryu sells a sliencer blade with laser cuts filled with resin that helps, but classic combo blade is pretty quiet. Full kerf blades are quietest to run, if you saw has the horse power.
The wood being cut also defines the noise Coarse grain woods seem to vibrate more than fine grain. Laminated man made panels buzz/vibrate a lot. Thin pieces make more noise, while thick MDF can be be almost silent cutting.

+1 Have to reinforce that saw tune up is important.
If your fence and/or blade is not square; tend to get some vibrations as the blade rubs on the wood after it has been cut. If you are burning the edges of wood during cut, it will make more noise.

+1 Sealing any air openings between floors reduces noise a lot. If your HVAC ducts run across the ceiling, you have noise transmission tunnels that will carry all the noise. That is why drop down panel ceilings used to be popular in basements.

PS – If have a noisy tool; one trick is to absorb the noise before it reaches any ‘flexible’ wall/ceiling surfaces with sound dampening materials. Covering the wall behind the saw, and ceiling above can help. Challenge with sound dampening is materials/installation cost is usually higher than noise prevention techniques.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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