LumberJocks

Can Anyone Help Identify this Wooden Plane

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by siemensgeek posted 07-30-2020 01:51 AM 734 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View siemensgeek's profile

siemensgeek

65 posts in 449 days


07-30-2020 01:51 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

This is the first wooden plane I’ve bought. My plane rescue affliction has been for iron planes until now. It found me in an antique store along with a Stanley No.5 and a Stanley 45 with the floral casting. What is this skew bladed plane and how do you use it? From searching the internet I think it is a panel raising plane but I could be wrong.

The iron has “DINGLY” stamped in it and the plane has “R.BEOXHAM” stamped in the end of the body along with “I.CANNIN” which I think was a previous owner . The iron is tapered in thickness and width. It has to be removed out the bottom and can’t be inserted completely by hand but if you rap on the back end of the body it will slowly retract all the way. The mouth is tiny when the iron is in place, it better make a thin shaving.

This is as far as the iron can be inserted by hand.

What should be in this dovetail slot?

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652


14 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7945 posts in 2628 days


#1 posted 07-30-2020 02:35 AM

Welcome to Lumberjocks Greg.

You may get a better response if instead of posting links, you use the “img” button to display the image in the posting. You should be able to edit your posting by clicking the edit link at the top and click the img button above the text box. You can either just upload the image to Lumberjocks or click the “from the web” link, paste the URLs you have listed above and click insert this image. The upload is preferred to photobucket links, because photobucket puts an annoying watermark on the image that makes it harder to see.

Note: using the “from the web” option simply pastes the URL into the text with an exclamation point before and after the the link so a shortcut is to simply edit and add the !s to the URL text yourself. Just click the preview to make sure it worked.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View siemensgeek's profile

siemensgeek

65 posts in 449 days


#2 posted 07-30-2020 02:50 AM

Thanks Nathan.

Now if I can convince it not to rotate the images. The only fix I have found for that so far is to take the picture in landscape. If the picture was taken with the phone vertical it gets rotated here. I have tried rotating the picture and re-saving it but it doesn’t work.

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7945 posts in 2628 days


#3 posted 07-30-2020 03:19 AM

What has always worked for me (iphone or ipad) is to edit the image on the device, click the crop/rotate option and make any slight crop to the image and save it. Not sure why LJ has a problem with rotated images but that seems to work. That’s another reason to preview before posting.

I am fairly sure that is that the R. Bloxham is actually the maker or brand of the plane. Marking planes with a stamp like that is pretty common for 19th century wooden planes at least. They sometimes also stamp the city on them as well because some tool makers had shops in more than one city. I had a wood shoulder plane that had a similar mark plus a “Philad” stamp and got lucky to find an old ad in a Philadelphia newspaper from 1812 advertising their tools. The “Dingly” mark is probably the makers mark of the blacksmith who made the iron for the plane maker. I am not sure whether the I. Cannin stamp is the R. Bloxham craftsman who actually made the plane or one of the owners of the plane to help them ID their tools when they are working in a shop with other craftsman or at a job site so that they can get their tools back into their toolbox at the end of the work day. It is possible that the plane maker put that stamp on there for the new owner when it was sold but that is just a guess.

EDIT: I forgot to add this link to another R. Bloxham plane I found when I did a quick search. You can see the makers mark plus some other marks in one of the pictures.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View siemensgeek's profile

siemensgeek

65 posts in 449 days


#4 posted 07-30-2020 04:09 AM

Thanks Nathan

Tomorrow I’ll try editing the images and reloading them. From the condition of the plane I never would have guessed it was that old. Maybe $26 wasn’t too much to pay. I’m surprised it showed up in an antique store in Comanche, TX.

I was misreading the R.BLOXHAM stamp which explains why I didn’t get any hits when I searched the internet. The plane in your link does indeed have the same stamp.

Any idea what should be in the dovetail slot? Maybe a nicker for cross grain cuts or a depth guide?

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8832 posts in 1815 days


#5 posted 07-30-2020 05:55 AM

I’d say Nathan covered the possibles on the plane. As far as the pics, you can hit the “preview” button before pulling the trigger to post them, and see how they will show. Allows for pre-post corrections.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7945 posts in 2628 days


#6 posted 07-30-2020 12:16 PM

I just looked at the plane body a little more closely and noticed that it is skewed while the iron isn’t. Am I seeing that right? That probably indicates that the iron is not the right one for this plane because I don’t think it would be possible to have it aligned flat across the bottom when setup in the plane. Maybe my brain is misinterpreting what it sees while lying on my side. ;-)

The dovetail might be for a nicker but it seems like it should be a little farther in front of the iron and with the rabbet along the edge, there might be some other guide or something that would fit in there? A depth guide might be an explanation but I don’t see any marks from a thumbscrew or any other means to lock it in place?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View siemensgeek's profile

siemensgeek

65 posts in 449 days


#7 posted 07-30-2020 02:31 PM

Nathan

The iron is skewed also. It has been hand sharpened and doesn’t match the base exactly. The iron is so tight in the body that I can’t make any lateral adjustment so I am going to sharpen it and make it line up with the base.

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7945 posts in 2628 days


#8 posted 07-30-2020 03:57 PM

Ah. Just the angle of the original photos.

BTW, If you don’t get an answer here about that dovetail and the rebate on the edge, you might try posting that last picture and asking for help on the Hand plane of your Dreams thread. That is where all the experts hang out. I’m kind of surprised none of them have stumbled by to correct me. :-)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View siemensgeek's profile

siemensgeek

65 posts in 449 days


#9 posted 07-30-2020 11:24 PM

Nathan

Thanks for all of the help.

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652

View siemensgeek's profile

siemensgeek

65 posts in 449 days


#10 posted 07-31-2020 12:58 AM

I hit the information jackpot. 1st I found a new book, which I just ordered, “Goodman’s British Planemakers”, Fourth Edition [Hardback]. R.Bloxman was indeed a 19th century British plane maker.

Next I found the web page of R. Arnold https://www.rarnoldvintagetools.com/
His collection includes 3 panel raising planes very much like mine but from different makers. The dovetailed groove on the side is for a depth guide.

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7945 posts in 2628 days


#11 posted 07-31-2020 01:55 AM

That looks like an interesting book. I was able to sort of thumb through quite a few pages on Amazon. Seeing all those different types of planes, makes me wonder what sort specialized tools that the plane makers made for themselves. I would also like to see the process for making the various molding plane irons.

I saw a couple of other planes in the R. Arnold collection that mentioned nicker irons being held in the dovetails too. Since it can really only cut as deep as the rebate along the right edge and that is not very deep, a nicker there makes more sense to me. In fact, if you look at the picture above that shows the bottom of your plane, the dovetail appears to be pretty close to lined up with the forward point of the iron.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View OleGrump's profile

OleGrump

581 posts in 1585 days


#12 posted 07-31-2020 07:43 PM

It sure looked like a panel raiser. Great find, as these don’t show up as regularly as many other wooden bodied planes. I was lucky enough to find one once that the dealer mistook for a smoothing plane… Heh heh heh…... Anyway, congratulations on the marvelous plane. Now to get raisin’ some panels with it! 8^)

-- OleGrump

View siemensgeek's profile

siemensgeek

65 posts in 449 days


#13 posted 08-02-2020 02:24 AM

Nathan
I e-mailed Rich Arnold with some pictures. He told me that R.Bloxham made planes in Banbury England between 1746 and 1778 so the plane is older than I ever would have thought. You may be correct on the nicker theory. I can’t get a decent picture of it but if you get the light right on the dovetail there is a rectangular impression at the bottom of the groove that sure could have been a blade.

Ole Grump
Now that I know how old it is I’m afraid to use it. I mean we are talking Revolutionary war dates. I sure would like to know how it wound up in a small antique store in a small town in Texas.

-- Greg, Amarillo quote - 'Tis dangerous meddling with edge-tools. ~John Tatham, c.1652

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7945 posts in 2628 days


#14 posted 08-02-2020 03:14 AM

Wow. I though my early 1800s plane was old. I’ll bet it works well. I would at least give it a try on some soft wood. It looks like it was well taken care of and they were obviously made to last. My skewed shoulder plane from around 1812 worked great and it was not nearly as well taken care of.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com