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Forum topic by dbdors posted 07-28-2020 03:14 AM 1021 views 1 time favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbdors

23 posts in 2097 days


07-28-2020 03:14 AM

I’ve been wood working for years, and was never sure I wanted to get into turning.

Been looking on Craigslist for a couple years and missed some opportunities, decided to pull the trigger on a 46-701(700). I know these have issues with the reeves pulleys, but for now it seems solid, and not used much.

It came with a NIB Delta G3 chuck, a Nova pen attachment, a nice Nova drill chuck, some craftsman HSS chisels, calipers and some pen kits.

I really have now idea where to start. Will be looking on YouTube for some beginners info. I do have a slow speed grinder that I bought years ago, but no sharpening attachments.

So any advice on sharpening jigs would be helpful.


28 replies so far

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dbdors

23 posts in 2097 days


#1 posted 07-28-2020 03:16 AM

More pics



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WoodenDreams

1125 posts in 764 days


#2 posted 07-28-2020 05:55 AM

I only started turning recently. I got into turning to turn segmented urns for funeral homes.

I would recommend watching this sharpening video from start to finish. By Thompson Tools https://youtu.be/j3k7CnR8JTw . Would recommend joining a woodworking club that has a turning side to it. They can help with honing your turning skills. One way to speed up the learning curve. They can show you and give you many first hand tips.

I’m sure you noticed already, you can spend a lot of cash on turning tools and accessories. I’ve been using Rockler to get my Nova accessories. And I plan getting some Thompson chisels and make my own chisel handles http://thompsonlathetools.com/ . To check out available options and kits, I did order catalogs from Penn State Ind https://www.pennstateind.com/ , Packard Woodworks https://www.packardwoodworks.com/

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Wildwood

2891 posts in 2987 days


#3 posted 07-28-2020 08:51 AM

Not sure what you want to ultimately want to turn if going to stay with pens the Basic Wolverine sharpening system will fit the bill, if want to more than just pens look at that Intermediate system. Been using the intermediate system for more than 25 years.

For those Sears tools you could get buy with Basic Wolverine system.
Think Intermediate set with optional Vari-grind jig & diamond wheel dresser better buy. That Vari-grind jig will let put either finger nail or side ground bevel on spindle or bowl gouges from ¼” to 5/8”.

https://www.packardwoodworks.com/sharp-wss.html

This is a Wolverine clone have no experience with:
https://www.pennstateind.com/store/LCGRIND4.html

Both Packard Woodworks & Penn State have free catalogs both already linked. Might also check out: http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com

Both Packard & Craft Supplies USA offer discounts if buy more than one turning tool but have to ask when ordering. All three sites do offer sales on lot of different items through the year so whether shop thru catalog or online. Catalog nice to gives big picture on what is available.

My second lathe was a Delta 700 w/out stand, didn’t 30 days before reeves drive quit. Long story short did away with reeves drive with help from local machine welding shop here. Turned on that thing for another ten or twelve years before retiring it to floor at rear of my shop. Replaced that lathe with Jet 1642. Little over a year ago gave that lathe to another retired Marine. We served together in Saudi & Kuwait during first Gulf War.

-- Bill

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OSU55

2658 posts in 2842 days


#4 posted 07-28-2020 01:22 PM

Take a look at the reeves drive pulleys and belt, make sure the pulleys slide freely. Rotate the spindle by hand and put some hand pressure on the speed adj lever, pulleys should slide easily for speed adj.

For sharpening the Wolverine system with Varigrind. Keep using the tools you have to learn how to sharpen and use them. Check the AAW website for a club near you. Start with spindle projects 1st to learn some tool control before going to faceplate – bowls and such. Mark Sillay has some very good utube vids.

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jmartel

9049 posts in 3003 days


#5 posted 07-28-2020 02:49 PM

Wolverine jig on a slow speed grinder would be the go to. Upgrade the wheels to CBN at a later date.

For starter projects, how about some mallets? Easy and quick to make, and everyone needs more things to hit other things with. Make a big F-off one, and a smaller one for chisel work.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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dbdors

23 posts in 2097 days


#6 posted 07-28-2020 03:22 PM


I only started turning recently. I got into turning to turn segmented urns for funeral homes. I would recommend watching this sharpening video from start to finish. By Thompson Tools https://youtu.be/j3k7CnR8JTw . Would recommend joining a woodworking club that has a turning side to it. They can help with honing your turning skills. One way to speed up the learning curve. They can show you and give you many first hand tips.
I m sure you noticed already, you can spend a lot of cash on turning tools and accessories. I ve been using Rockler to get my Nova accessories. And I plan getting some Thompson chisels and make my own chisel handles http://thompsonlathetools.com/ . To check out available options and kits, I did order catalogs from Penn State Ind https://www.pennstateind.com/ , Packard Woodworks https://www.packardwoodworks.com/

- WoodenDreams

Thanks, I will check out the video. And yes, expensive which is why I was hesitant to get into turning. But I got the lathe and tools for $250. And thought not too much to try it out.

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dbdors

23 posts in 2097 days


#7 posted 07-28-2020 03:24 PM

I wont reply to all, but all great suggestions. I have a mallet, but making my own would be cool. Thanks for the suggestion.

As for the pulleys, Im really scared to even look at them. But if a little maintenance will helps, then I’ll certainly do that.

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dbdors

23 posts in 2097 days


#8 posted 07-28-2020 03:30 PM

Oh, and I have no idea what I want to turn. I do know that I have wanted to try some pens in the past. Maybe a nice decorative bole would be cool down the road.

But many say, and it appears to be relaxing and generally enjoyable.

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Ripper70

1378 posts in 1761 days


#9 posted 07-28-2020 03:39 PM

RJBWoodTurner has allot of pen making vids that could help you figure out what to do with all those kits you have.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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pottz

11296 posts in 1837 days


#10 posted 07-28-2020 05:29 PM

pens are a great way to start turning,easy to make and a lot of fun.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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MrUnix

8212 posts in 3052 days


#11 posted 07-28-2020 06:09 PM

Not a bad haul for $250… The chuck alone is probably worth half that! As for the reeves drive – as long as you keep it well maintained, it should hold up just fine. Most of the time, they are damaged when left unlubricated, requiring a lot of force to move the pulleys. That, and trying to change speeds without the machine running. Keep it good and lubed up and use it as instructed and you will be fine.

The pen kits will get you started. I never did care for pens, but for some, that is all they do and love it. At least you won’t need to go out and purchase extra stuff just to find out if it’s your cup of tea or not.

For sharpening, check out Capt'n Eddies $2 jig. I made a similar one out of scrap wood for use on my belt sander, and it works perfect every time. You can of course go out and spend hundreds of dollars on various sharpening systems if you like – I prefer to keep it cheap ;)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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dbdors

23 posts in 2097 days


#12 posted 07-29-2020 06:58 PM



Not a bad haul for $250… The chuck alone is probably worth half that! As for the reeves drive – as long as you keep it well maintained, it should hold up just fine…..

The extras like the chucks were why I jumped on the deal quickly. I’ll remove the covers and do some maintenance on the drives, thanks.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3128 posts in 3797 days


#13 posted 07-29-2020 07:23 PM

First, you’re going to need a second mortgage. . . .

Like you, I worked wood for years (about fifty) and never used a lathe. I never even touched one, until a couple years ago. When I had to do repairs that required spindle work, I jury rigged my drill press and used my RotoZip or a trim router, files, sand paper and time. Lots of time.

It was mind boggling to learn how easy spindle work was, and that I could have done in minute what took a couple hours on the drill press.

A few years later, I have three lathes. I just sold the Nova. Of the three I have left, two a big old Jet and a big old Delta, have Reeves drives. The third is a Jet mini (1014), which requires belt swaps, but is still a treasured piece of equipment. I’ll sell the Delta, once I get paint on it and get it re-assembled [with the new bearings].

I guess it should be obvious, from the above, I wouldn’t consider my shop complete without a lathe and a few chucks and such.

Most people seem to love the challenge of bowls. I prefer to see what I can do with spindle work [and the occasional functional bowl]. The mallet thing is nice. I can destroy them knowing a replacement is, at most, an hour away. Then there are the many file handles too. My rocks out side the shop door is littered with brand new, genuine, antique fishing net floats ( ;) ) and sun baked ornaments [also brand new antiques].

For twists, I laminate acrylics with wood and turn ornaments. Too, I copper plate many of my small turnings, setting them off from everyone else’s.

As to sharpening, that’s a big experiment too. Others will tell you what you need, but they are really telling you want they need. Their angles and shapes are just excellent jumping off points.

Though I have a infinitely variable speed [and reversible] four wheel grinder with the Wolverine set up, CBN’s, a diamond and a carbide wheel, most my sharpening is touch up done freehand on my little 1” x 42” yard sale Delta belt sander. The only thing I use for that, if at all, is the angle gauges I came up with for setting the table angle.

Killer deal, by the way.

Here are some of my pages of the things described above:

- The laminated wood and acrylic: https://www.instructables.com/id/Making-Light-Catching-Laminated-Wood-Plastic-and-C/

- The angle gauges:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Angle-Set-Up-Gauges-for-Grinders-and-Belt-Sanders/

- Some of the [home] copper plated turnings:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Angle-Set-Up-Gauges-for-Grinders-and-Belt-Sanders/

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4yanks

5 posts in 3198 days


#14 posted 07-29-2020 08:53 PM

If you are into making furniture, making small tables with turned legs is fairly easy and offers nearly instant gratification. Stools are another great opportunity to learn as well, only slightly more complex.

-- Willie, Morehead City, NC

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Lazyman

5819 posts in 2240 days


#15 posted 07-29-2020 09:38 PM

Some good info above. For technique and ideas, YouTube is your friend. Start with spindle turning to build skill and confidence then graduate to bowls and hollow forms if you are looking for things that are more challenging. Once you start thinking beyond spindles, you will need to look at some other tools. My first turned project was this bottle opener after watching a YouTube video.
Click for details

Very simple and it actually works very well. I put the link to the guy’s YouTube video in the posting. You can see some of my other turned projects for ideas of varying difficulty as well. Everything from shift nobs to beer mugs to bowls and vases.

Here are some of the my favorite YouTube channels for beginners. I have learned tons from these guys and still watch some of them for ideas:
Mike Peace.
  • He shows up here on LJ every now and then and he has some great instructional videos as well as projects that will appeal to all levels of experience.
Brian Havens.
  • He has good videos that explain different types of turning tools and their use. I learned a lot from his videos over the years and still revisit some of them from time to time.
Wymomingwoodturner
  • Lots of great project ideas and demonstrations

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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