LumberJocks

I set hinges what’s wrong

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by notdan posted 07-23-2020 01:25 AM 512 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View notdan's profile

notdan

33 posts in 2236 days


07-23-2020 01:25 AM

See pics. Installing frame inset blum hinges. One is perfect the other pulls in and no adjustments seem to fix it. Where did I go wrong and how to fix?


8 replies so far

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

1022 posts in 1032 days


#1 posted 07-23-2020 01:31 AM

You have to have a stopper on the back side of the door

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8942 posts in 3430 days


#2 posted 07-23-2020 01:52 AM

It needs a positive stop as mentioned above.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1417 posts in 580 days


#3 posted 07-23-2020 01:54 AM

You mounted them upside down.

-- I only know... what I know....

View DS's profile

DS

3548 posts in 3273 days


#4 posted 07-23-2020 01:56 AM

Blum Clip hinges come standard with 5 degrees of overtravel. (Has it’s useful purposes)
As previously mentioned, door stops are required for this situation.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View pottz's profile

pottz

11296 posts in 1837 days


#5 posted 07-23-2020 06:01 PM

as ds said the over travel is so the door stays snug in the frame againts a stop.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5886 posts in 1442 days


#6 posted 07-23-2020 06:33 PM

There are several ways to add that stop. It can be as simple as a small block that you mount to the back of the face frame so it protrudes a quarter inch or so to block the door. If it’s a lower cabinet, put it at the top, so it’s not visible from an upper angle.

When I do cabinets that are going to be under a sink, I add a strip across the top of the door opening behind the face frame (assuming there’s no fake drawer plate, which I hate). It acts as a stop and also helps hide the sink and plumbing.

Finally, you can have the floor sit a quarter inch or so above the bottom rail. The problem these days is that using sheet goods leaves an exposed edge. You can put banding on it, but that’s more than I’m going to bother with. However, if you’re doing a traditional cabinet, it’s the way to go.

Finally, if you go with overlay, none of this matters. I charge more for inset because they’re more work.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View notdan's profile

notdan

33 posts in 2236 days


#7 posted 07-26-2020 02:56 AM

Thanks as always, super helpful!

View DS's profile

DS

3548 posts in 3273 days


#8 posted 08-11-2020 05:47 AM



as ds said the over travel is so the door stays snug in the frame againts a stop.

- pottz

While this statement is very correct, the overtravel also serves to allow that any angle from -45 to +45 degrees can be made with a combination of base plates, wedges and angled hinges available at 15 degree intervals.
It comes in handy when you need a door hinged at 37.8 degrees or something ridiculous like that.

I’ve done many a multi-faceted, goofy-looking kitchen island this way.
Just sayin’

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com