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Craftsman Jointer 103.23340 - loose bed bolts

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Forum topic by ikan posted 07-22-2020 01:17 AM 686 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ikan

4 posts in 372 days


07-22-2020 01:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: craftsman jointer craftsman 10323340 jointer 10323340 loose bolts bed adjustment question help please vintage jointer rebuild vintage jointer jointer repair

Help Please !

I am in the process of replacing the motor on my Craftsman Jointer and decided to fit it with a vacuum port while it was out of commision. When I turned it over, I found, to my dismay, two of the bed anchor bolts are finger loose. One is on the fixed side of the cutter head and the other is at the top of the adjustment screw for the adjustable side of the bed. I am unfamiliar with this type of bolt configuration so not sure which is the adjustment and which is the anchor but more importantly I need to know (or learn) how to reset both sides of the bed to true and level.


16 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3946 posts in 2956 days


#1 posted 07-22-2020 01:37 AM

My first jointer was a Craftsman with the fixed outfeed table. So glad to be rid of that time thief jointer.
I used it until the knives flew.
Do yourself a favor and find something else.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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ikan

4 posts in 372 days


#2 posted 07-22-2020 01:45 AM

Thank you Aj2 for the advice

View xedos's profile

xedos

366 posts in 459 days


#3 posted 07-25-2020 02:41 PM

Aj2 – perhaps you should look a little closer at the pics, and do some research before giving bad advice and perpetuating false rumors .

While some of the craftsman jointers (particularly from the 70’s ) had fixed beds, the King Seeley models of ikan’s machine DO NOT ! The 6” models even had adjustable cutter heads as well.

Those bolts are actually leveling jacks so that one can adjust the beds copalnar. Level doesn’t really matter as long as the beds , cutterhead/knives are all aligned in the same plane. Loosen the nuts, turn the bolts(jacks) to align the tables and then re-tighnten the nuts.

ikan – this link should be of value to you:
http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/222/596.pdf

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2535 posts in 3951 days


#4 posted 07-25-2020 03:46 PM

Those craftsman jointers are a very usable machine. I had mine for 30 years. This one needs some rust remover and TLC, but for a small home shop, a nice smaller jointer.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2487 posts in 760 days


#5 posted 07-25-2020 03:58 PM

I have a Craftsman that I picked up for $150 and it works great. I assumed that I could not adjust the fixed outfeed or the infeed but now know what to look for. Forgive me for not flipping that thing to look. I to want to make a vac port & collector.

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Aj2

3946 posts in 2956 days


#6 posted 07-25-2020 04:01 PM

Well this wouldn’t be the first time I was accused of fabricating. :)
I know what the bolts do.
Nothing stops anyone from buying a fixed bed jointer.
Ibewjon I’m glad you got one that works well. I used mine till the knives flew out. Soon after that the internet was born and I was able to buy a machine worth my time.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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ibewjon

2535 posts in 3951 days


#7 posted 07-25-2020 05:16 PM

I recently gave it to my nephew. I found a Delta, 8”, long bed that I use now.. for chip collection, mine had the craftsman base, so I was able to slip in a piece of plywood just below the jointer. Added 4” port, and aluminum tape to seal. Worked great for what it was.

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xedos

366 posts in 459 days


#8 posted 07-26-2020 02:30 AM

“I know what the bolts do.
Nothing stops anyone from buying a fixed bed jointer.”

If you do, then why did you bring up fixed bed jointers in the first place ? Just to throw shade on Craftsman ? It’s not really germain to the subject/issue at hand.

They have certainly made their fair share of stinkers , but this isn’t one of them. Telling someone to give up on a tool becasue you weren’t successful at a different tool isn’t helpful to anyone but you.

View ikan's profile

ikan

4 posts in 372 days


#9 posted 07-26-2020 02:47 AM

Thank you xendos. I will follow the link but your description takes me miles down the road of understanding what I am trying to repair. btw you are correct my machine needs much TLC, however I am in a project that will not allow me the luxury of the time needed for the restoration it needs. It is my plan to do a full restoration after the first of the year.

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controlfreak

2487 posts in 760 days


#10 posted 07-26-2020 10:05 AM

Now that I know what is going on under there I have a good excuse now to buy a fancy long straight edge to see if I need any adjustments.

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Aj2

3946 posts in 2956 days


#11 posted 07-26-2020 02:06 PM


Now that I know what is going on under there I have a good excuse now to buy a fancy long straight edge to see if I need any adjustments.

- controlfreak


Don’t do it. They are a pain to get right. Think about it turning the jointer upside down to adjust the bed to be coplaner with the infeed. If you have one with flat tables consider yourself lucky and leave it alone.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

2167 posts in 3342 days


#12 posted 07-26-2020 04:22 PM

Adjusting for coplaner is a one-time thing, even if it’s annoying. And it’s much easier to adjust those tables than e.g. shimming dovetailed ways.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2487 posts in 760 days


#13 posted 07-26-2020 04:57 PM

So as long as I don’t check I am okay then.

View ikan's profile

ikan

4 posts in 372 days


#14 posted 07-26-2020 05:19 PM



Now that I know what is going on under there I have a good excuse now to buy a fancy long straight edge to see if I need any adjustments.

- controlfreak

Not to spoil your craving to spend but you don’t need to spend any more than the price of a 3/16-1/4 inch thick piece of aluminum bar to get a reliable edge. I have been relying on a 4 foot and am 8 foot 1/4 inch bar for several years with excellent result.

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Aj2

3946 posts in 2956 days


#15 posted 07-26-2020 05:45 PM



So as long as I don t check I am okay then.

- controlfreak

If your able to get two pieces jointed together let’s say 2 ft long. No gaps in the middle or on the ends don’t mess with the bolts. Since you confess to being a control freak. At least wait until you have a reliable straight edge. :)
I always use a precision straight edge.
Good Luck

-- Aj

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