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Do chainsaw gloves protect your hands from the blade of a jigsaw?

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Forum topic by simplex1 posted 07-19-2020 06:42 AM 2141 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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simplex1

3 posts in 233 days


07-19-2020 06:42 AM

I know that gloves of any kind do not protect a woodworker against a circular saw, on the contrary they can make matters worse. However, when using a jigsaw, like the one in the picture, do chainsaw gloves, or of a different type, protect the hands and fingers of the worker from the blade? I have read that the jigsaw is one of the least dangerous power tools for cutting wood and other materials and I intend to buy one but I never used any power tool for cutting. I want to utilize it especially for making long straight cuts in plywood up to 1/2 inch thick and also for cutting framing studs 2×4 inch (which I understand are in fact 1.5×3.5 inch). Sometimes, but rarely, I have to cut the stud along its longitudinal axis to make two thinner studs. I do not plan to use this tool too often. Maybe, twice a year.


4.8 Amp Corded Variable Speed Orbital Jig Saw

Video showing a chainsaw stopped by a special glove:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBhor_4zIXk
Soft Touch Chainsaw Glove C-2000


31 replies so far

View LittleBlackDuck's profile (online now)

LittleBlackDuck

6530 posts in 1831 days


#1 posted 07-19-2020 08:59 AM

If you use a tool worrying about protection, you are either using it wrong or have a dire wish list…

Kevlar gloves (available in many woodworing retailers) are supposed to protect carvers… I bought one after tattooing myself trying to open oysters… since then I was more careful and haven’t slipped to confirm their success. I have no plans in trying my chance with workshop tools.

It’s like that sawstop demonstration… I’ve seen hundreds of sausages cut, but have never seen one with a demonstrator offering his finger. Maybe that video would be more convincing if the guy tried it with his hand in the glove not a board.

A scrollsaw is safe if used properly, while a misused plastic knife can kill. Maybe practice with it more than 2 times a year so you know how to operate it safely… Furthermore, with thick gloves you loose the feel and some control over tools.

BTW. Welcome to LJ… not trying to be a smart arse, however, think of Murphy!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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controlfreak

1782 posts in 612 days


#2 posted 07-19-2020 10:42 AM

Just buy its design a jigsaw is very difficult to get your fingers in front of the blade. Making long cuts it will be difficult to cut a line without a guide. A better tool would be a circular saw or a track saw. If you are very afraid of either of those you may want to hire that work out.

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Redoak49

5094 posts in 2999 days


#3 posted 07-19-2020 11:28 AM

Hey Duckie …..You are wrong!

Try a bit of Google To for SawStop Finger Demo and you will find people putting their finger into a blade.

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tvrgeek

1441 posts in 2660 days


#4 posted 07-19-2020 11:41 AM

Accidents happen from not thinking. Gloves will not help you think. Ear, eye and lung protection, and maybe steel toe shoes are the safety products you should invest in for carpentry work.

A jig saw is intended for making curved cuts in thin materials. It is a very poor choice for cutting a 2×4 and even worse for cutting the length of one. Wrong tool for the job. Using one, both hands are on the handle, nowhere near the blade, so other than kick back, pretty safe. Eye protection a must and for many materials, ear protection.

If I only needed to cut the ends off a few boards twice a year, I would use a hand saw. If I needed to split a 2×4, I would buy a 2×2. The big box stores will make a cut or two in plywood on their panel saw for you but a hand saw does just fine. Hand saws worked fine for thousands of years. Better when steel was invented, but the Egyptians did pretty well with copper and bronze 4000 years ago. All houses were built with hand saws until after 1923 when the Skill saw was invented.

Lastly, cheap tools are more dangerous than good tools. Under powered and less precise so you wind up forcing them. That is when accidents happen.

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Lazyman

6647 posts in 2398 days


#5 posted 07-19-2020 11:56 AM

It would probably protect you from cuts but probably not necessary. A jig saw is probably the least risky power tool I have. Very little likelihood of injury to your hands in the first place if used properly and the blade stops relatively quickly when the trigger is released. Heck, its not even that good at cutting wood.

While impressive, I think that the demo of the chain saw glove would be more convincing if he had not screwed it down. One of the problems with gloves and power tools is that when they catch, they pull you into the tool too fast to react. Maybe they should put a hunk of meat latex glove latex and put meat inside the glove (hot dogs for the fingers?) sitting on top of the board and show that it didn’t break the latex. Also, if it pulls the glove off of your hand before it bogs down it stops doing you any good.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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LittleBlackDuck

6530 posts in 1831 days


#6 posted 07-19-2020 12:15 PM



Hey Duckie …..You are wrong! Try a bit of Google To for SawStop Finger Demo and you will find people putting their finger into a blade.

- Redoak49


I’ve never seen it myself and I’ve never been keen in seeking out self mutilators on the net, however, I don’t doubt your word…

Rumors have it that Knuckles was forced into retirement by sawstop… couldn’t do his shoe laces up anymore.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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SMP

3442 posts in 916 days


#7 posted 07-19-2020 12:42 PM

I’m actually more scared of my ryoba hand saw than my jig saw. I’ve only cut myself with a jigsaw once in the past 30+ years and it was while being totally reckless in a hurry working in a production shop when I was much younger. And as mentioned it barely cut.

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Lazyman

6647 posts in 2398 days


#8 posted 07-19-2020 01:50 PM

That’s a very good point. I have never cut myself with a jigsaw but I regularly nick myself with razor sharp chisels, carving tools and Japanese style saw blades. I have also had more trouble with a drill when I didn’t clamp it down well enough and it grabbed and spun the piece.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2269 posts in 3803 days


#9 posted 07-19-2020 01:56 PM

Gloves will make it worse if you somehow get a finger in the blade. The coarse teeth with catch the glove and not release it. Your fingers will be trapped against the blade and saw base. There is no reason to put your fingers in that location when using a jig saw.

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robscastle

7745 posts in 3215 days


#10 posted 07-21-2020 08:37 PM

Knuckles

I once sadly managed to cut all of my fingers off with a table saw.

Realising the seriousness of the situation i went straight to hospital
The first question they asked was did I bring my severed fingers with me so they could sew them back on.
Sadly i didnt!

Also be aware kevlar designed to stop high velocity projectiles will not necessarily stop a box cutter type knife attack.

Whilst on the subject of chain saws check out this Aussie invention

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T5WO9nulOXc

-- Regards Rob

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runswithscissors

3128 posts in 3035 days


#11 posted 07-22-2020 02:06 AM

When I was about 8, my uncle gave me a Dremel “Moto Saw.” This was configured like a coping saw, and used a solenoid or magnet to power the blade on the downstroke, and a spring for the upstroke. It cycled at AC frequency (60 cycles), and had a very short stroke. This was the world’s safest (also most useless) saw. The only way you could hurt yourself with it would be to fall into a bathtub full of water while using it.

I sometimes would hold my thumb up against the blade, and watch the flesh of my thumb vibrate up and down. It was terrible at cutting wood. If you tried to lengthen the stroke (there was an adjustment knob), it would get out of phase and make a horrible racket. It had one useful teaching function: it would teach you patience and fortitude. I don’t know whether Dremel makes this anymore

Anyhow, I agree, a jig saw is a poor choice for making long straight cuts in anything. It is designed to cut curves. I did have one, however that could rip a two-by. It was the old Wen All Saw (not Sawzall) with a 1” stroke and a lot of power. It used big blades, recipsrocating saw blades, I believe. When I burned out the armature, the repair shop in Seattle sold me a new one for $10. Even at the time, I realized that was incredibly cheap.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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HerringImpaired

89 posts in 719 days


#12 posted 07-22-2020 05:16 AM

When I bought my first Jigsaw almost 50 years ago, my Grandpa gave me some advice that I still follow.
He said when using any saw or drill, don’t put your hands in front of the saw or under the board you are sawing/drilling. Has served me well over the years…..
Too bad he didn’t have any sage advice regarding routers! ☺

-- "My greatest fear is that upon my demise, my wife will sell my tools for what I said I paid for them."

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LittleBlackDuck

6530 posts in 1831 days


#13 posted 07-22-2020 06:43 AM



I ve been wanting to learn woodworking for a minute and I found this blog that teach me everything and gave guidelines to do certain projects. You guys should really check this out if your just beginning to grasp woodworking
Come check it out

- mealtho


Looks like you’ve been GOTCHA’d!

Usually the owner of the post Flags it,

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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theart

233 posts in 1565 days


#14 posted 07-22-2020 02:01 PM

It sounds like you want a circular saw, not a jig saw. But in either case, if your fingers are anywhere near the blade you’re doing something very wrong. If your work piece is well supported, and you have both hands on the tool your fingers are safe. You’ll still want gloves for cutting plywood though. Those splinters are a pain to get out.

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MrRon

5994 posts in 4254 days


#15 posted 07-22-2020 06:08 PM

It is never a good idea to wear gloves, (any kind) when using tools, (any kind) as they keep you from having an intimate connection with the tool to perform properly and safely. Gloves can actually make it unsafe. Just my personal opinion.

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