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Help with new (very old) lathe

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Forum topic by Rmontgomery84 posted 07-16-2020 01:02 AM 539 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rmontgomery84

2 posts in 24 days


07-16-2020 01:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe woodturning help question new guy

Hello – I’m new here!

As my tool collection slowly grows I’ve been keeping my eye out for a used lathe. I picked this one up on craigslist for $45 for the lathe and a basket of chisels. I’m generally handy and can handle most projects but I’m a bit nervous about hooking this thing up and getting killed. The motor needs new power supply cable but appears to run smoothly otherwise.

Does anyone know how the belt hooks up to operate the unit? I can’t find any make/model on the lathe to even begin to look up an old manual.

-- "The face of a child can say it all, especially the mouth part of the face." - Jack Handey


12 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8159 posts in 3004 days


#1 posted 07-16-2020 03:43 AM

Looks like an early-30’s Craftsman lathe – hard to tell which one, there was a 6” and an 8” that were very similar. Measure the distance from the spur center to bed to check. You can then go over to the VintageMachinery site and look at some pictures to make a positive ID and find a catalog entry and/or manual for it. You can also go to the OWWM site to get more information from other owners.

The motor you have is not setup for your lathe – it should have a stepped pulley on it matched to the one that is on the lathe. I see a bunch of pulleys in the picture – is one the matching stepped pulley?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1758 posts in 3598 days


#2 posted 07-16-2020 12:10 PM

I have and used a similar lathe for years. As Brad said, you need a stepped pulley for the motor. The large diameter on the lathe lines up with the small on the motor. This gives you three speeds. Small on the motor to large on the lathe gives the low speed to start turning a piece. The large on the motor to small on the lathe gives the highest speed for finishing. Align the pulleys with a straight edge when bolting down to a stout table. Definitely put a knee operated paddle switch where you can shut it off with your knee if you have a problem. It looks like the tailstock has a non rotating ‘dead’ center. I put a bit of grease on the center to wood contact area. Leave the stock a little long and cut off the grease spot. Don’t blame me if you get hooked and want a new, larger lathe. I started with my lathe like yours when I was 14. I now have two more lathes as well. And always looking for another! Thanks for reading this long reply.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14505 posts in 1943 days


#3 posted 07-16-2020 12:48 PM

What they said^. Only thing I’ll add is that your motor is not enclosed and lathes can produce a lot of dust. You might want to try to shield the motor as best you can or it’s life may not be too long if you do a lot of turning.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5655 posts in 2192 days


#4 posted 07-16-2020 12:55 PM

That looks like the blower motor that I salvaged from and old AC unit. Mine has a separate capacitor that came with it. One of these guys might be able to tell you if that is needed for this one. Also, you will want to wire a switch in the power line and put that somewhere convenient just in case you need to shut it down quickly. The switch needs to be out of line with whatever is mounted so that you can turn it on and off out of the line of fire.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2784 posts in 1408 days


#5 posted 07-16-2020 05:32 PM

Per a suggestion Brad gave me a couple of years ago, a suggestion to modernize it would be to grab a free treadmill off of Craigslist and use a treadmill motor which will give you variable speed.

My vintage lathe worked wonderfully until I upgraded to a H. Freight mini-lathe. The biggest drawback of those vintage lathes is that they use MT1 tapers which aren’t as popular today as the MT2 which is the minimum size that comes on current lathes. Rather than getting MT1 tapered gear I’d get MT2 and an adapter so that you don’t have to buy new stuff when you upgrade.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Rmontgomery84's profile

Rmontgomery84

2 posts in 24 days


#6 posted 07-17-2020 03:14 AM

Guys seriously this has been more helpful than you know thank you!

I’ve got a new power cord on it and have it wired inline to a toggle foot pedal for automatic shutoff if something happens.

As far as the shield suggestion I built a shield/cage out of garage scraps. All went well except for a minor crack in the plastic. Hoping this does the trick.

Regarding variable speeds I’ll definitely keep an eye out for a free treadmill motor! In the meantime I was thinking about wiring in a fan/motor controller so I don’t have to switch pulleys, but I don’t want to fry the motor.

https://www.homedepot.com/pep/CANARM-Industrial-Fan-Switch-for-2-Fans-CN5041/204854836?mtc=Shopping-BA-FBold-G-D27L-2720CEILINGFANS-Multi-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-BOLD&cmmmc=Shopping-BA-FBold-G-D27L-2720CEILINGFANS-Multi-NA-Feed-PLA-NA-NA-BOLD-71700000066452220-58700005836823386-92700053380753897&gclsrc=aw.ds&&gclid=Cj0KCQjw9b4BRCMARIsADMUIyrE2pMuQS-4A9j4WOOCbTRf0dp0C6ZqfCjyGVxEhF0kmyn0gJ5EaAkCNEALwwcB

Again I’m a total noob with woodturning and have been wanting to get into it for a long time. Thanks!

-- "The face of a child can say it all, especially the mouth part of the face." - Jack Handey

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5655 posts in 2192 days


#7 posted 07-17-2020 04:23 AM

You cannot use that fan controller with that type of motor. It just won’t work. Based upon the picture showing only 3 wires, it will only run at one speed, which should be listed somewhere on the outside of the motor. You will have to use a step pulley to get different speeds.

Also, I would not use a deadman foot switch. As you turn, you will not stand in a single spot. You will need to change position, or shift your weight from one foot to another as you make different cuts and having to maintain pressure on a foot switch will hinder you and be uncomfortable and maybe unsafe if you have to stay in a certain position as you change the angle of cut or move down a spindle. What ever switch that you use, make sure that it is rated for the amperage of the motor and technically it should rated for a motor too, though I have seen many people just use regular light switches for that.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2784 posts in 1408 days


#8 posted 07-17-2020 05:38 AM

Don’t spend a lot of $ on this lathe. If you get into the hobby you’ll soon want a better one. There are always free treadmills on CList or OfferUp. I agree about not using a deadman switch. Buy one of these. You will be able to use it on something else as your shop grows. It’s magnetic so if the power dies to it it won’t start up and try to kill you or the dog when you reset the breaker.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5655 posts in 2192 days


#9 posted 07-17-2020 11:58 AM

+1 on Andy’s switch recommendation. You will need some sort of junction box, either DIY from wood or one from Home Depot/Lowes, to cover the electrical connections.

One more recommendation. Get yourself a face shield (not one designed for medical use). Spindle turning is generally fairly low risk but if something does release while spinning really fast, it could prevent a serious injury. I never turn without one. I highly recommend the Uvex Bionic shield but the prices have gone through the roof with people buying them to protect from the virus. You can probably find a cheaper option if you don’t want to spend $50 on one now.

BTW, while your motor shield looks great, I would either remove the plexiglass over the belt and pulley or add a hinge to that section at least that allows belt changes. Did you find a step pulley for the motor?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14505 posts in 1943 days


#10 posted 07-17-2020 12:29 PM

Nathan’s right about that motor speed controller. It only works with universal motors (ac/dc). And if I understood you, your foot switch is a toggle, not a momentary (dead-man switch). That should be fine. If it is a dead-man switch, Nathan’s right, that will be a huge pain when turning.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5655 posts in 2192 days


#11 posted 07-17-2020 01:57 PM

That must have been painful for you Kenny saying “Nathan’s right” twice (even though one was conditional). ;-)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

7663 posts in 1517 days


#12 posted 07-17-2020 03:29 PM



That must have been painful for you Kenny saying “Nathan s right” twice (even though one was conditional). ;-)

- Lazyman

BAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHA :<))))
now being serious take any advice Nathan is willing to hand out as he is a master turner oh S#!T now i hope his head still fits thru the door LOL

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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