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Forum topic by davidcl64 posted 07-16-2020 01:02 AM 567 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


07-16-2020 01:02 AM

Background – my wife is very sensitive to wood dust, mold, etc. To help combat this, we are looking at adding a buffer space between the garage and the rest of the house.

Our garage is a 3 car tandem, L shaped space. The front area is approximately 20’ x 20’. The back area is approximately 14’ x 9’ (not sure how that could fit a car but that’s another discussion).

I’m currently torn between creating a minimal vestibule and making a larger finishing area in the back of the garage.

Creating a larger room in the back (finishing area) would mean easier climate control in the winter (my garage is not climate controlled) along with easier access from the house for the freezer/fridge and other home storage. That area also has a window for ventilation and natural light.

The vestibule option gives me more space for woodworking (making dust & shavings) overall and a hand tool area with natural light, but it does make access to the fridge/freezer/storage a bit more cumbersome.

I’ve tried to put about 36” of working space at the working areas of each station (see the attached pics). Also some of this equipment is aspirational :D but it’s my ideal setup.

Would love any thoughts, suggestions, smacks upside the head, etc…!

Vestibule Option:

Overhead view

Finishing Room Option

Overhead view


21 replies so far

View Notw's profile

Notw

779 posts in 2562 days


#1 posted 07-16-2020 02:22 PM

I’m not sure how the vestibule option would help as it is just extra open space and dust goes everywhere, maybe i am missing something on that one.

On the second layout I like the finishing room option as it gives you a little separation between the house and shop, providing you remember to keep the door closed, but i might move some stuff around. Not sure where the garage doors are but i would put my lathes close to it as they make a huge mess and could be rolled outside on nice days to turn outside. Also, i would move all the major dust producing machines as close to the gyro as possible. drum sander, spindle sander etc and then put handle tools closer to the finishing room.

With the finishing room do the fumes from finishes not bother your wife? I’m good with most finishes but hate the process of finishes like Waterlox off gassing for days.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3187 posts in 2607 days


#2 posted 07-16-2020 02:39 PM

Do you really need help designing your shop layout from perfect strangers. Or are you showing off your conceptual drawing skills. Or stealth gloating
There’s going to be a lot harder choices to make if you get this thing going.
My advise is put outlets everywhere and run wire in conduit on the outside of walls. Plan on changing as you see fit. What works and want doesn’t is best figured out first hand.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

8990 posts in 2959 days


#3 posted 07-16-2020 03:05 PM

I’d probably go with the vestibule option. More space, and I’m willing to bet if wood dust causes issues for your wife, finishing vapors might as well.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3397 posts in 4246 days


#4 posted 07-16-2020 03:08 PM

As far as the comment about showing off your conceptual skill drawing or gloating I think that was a bit strong. I’ve got a son in law who is a mechanical engineer and he’d send me plans for a birdhouse measured to the 64th of an inch with a cad drawing just because that’s how he does things. I’d do a marginally legible drawing in pencil with a few measurements with question marks next to them. You’re okay… wish I had those skills.

I think you’re looking for any suggestions from people who have wrestled with this dilemma and can offer any advice about how to do or not to do it.

That being said, I have a garrison shop above my garage that isn’t attached to my house so I probably can offer little advice. But I’ll take a stab at it. Dust gets EVERYWHERE. I think those people with high end dust collection mitigation and those ceiling filter devices probably have better luck but I’ll bet they still see it.
If you have a small area that separates your shop from the house I can see where it will still infiltrate. I’m wondering if one of the doors in that walk through area was an exterior door with rubber gasket. Sort of like you see in the grey, steel, exterior doors that they sell everywhere. Then open it minimally to go through to the living area. Just a thought. Like I said I’ve never had to mitigate an issue like this other than to know that I’ve given up on white wall that turn tan from dust in my shop. Good luck with it.
As I type this I can envision a sort of airlock. A small walkthrough hallway with a sealed door on the shop end and the house end with an air filtration device mounted on the ceiling that is left running while you’re working. I dunno, just thinking our loud.

BTW… if you solve the problem, post some drawings on how you did it. It might help someone else ;-)

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View davidcl64's profile

davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


#5 posted 07-16-2020 04:05 PM



I m not sure how the vestibule option would help as it is just extra open space and dust goes everywhere, maybe i am missing something on that one.

The vestibule would be closed off between the shop and vestibule space. I didn’t do a good job of finishing that part of the drawing off. I was also thinking of how I might create positive air pressure temporarily in that space so air would be forced back into the shop when opening the door. Something like a switch controlled fan with a filter…


Not sure where the garage doors are but i would put my lathes close to it as they make a huge mess and could be rolled outside on nice days to turn outside.

Love this idea! Are you a turner yourself?


Also, i would move all the major dust producing machines as close to the gyro as possible. drum sander, spindle sander etc and then put handle tools closer to the finishing room.

Good points


With the finishing room do the fumes from finishes not bother your wife? I m good with most finishes but hate the process of finishes like Waterlox off gassing for days.

I had primarily been using wipe/brush on finishes like pre-polymerized linseed oil and shellac but I can foresee a day where I try other finishes and techniques and that could become and issue. If I remember at the time, I suppose I could do that type of finishing in the main shop area – trouble is remembering when I have a nice warm room to do it in in the middle of winter :D

View davidcl64's profile

davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


#6 posted 07-16-2020 04:06 PM



I d probably go with the vestibule option. More space, and I m willing to bet if wood dust causes issues for your wife, finishing vapors might as well.

You are right – I think she would definitely be bothered by strong fumes

View davidcl64's profile

davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


#7 posted 07-16-2020 04:10 PM


There’s going to be a lot harder choices to make if you get this thing going.

I don’t relish the idea of spending money multiple times to change out partition walls in the shop. I’m hoping for input from folks who have both more and different experiences than I have in the hopes of avoiding those mistakes.


My advise is put outlets everywhere and run wire in conduit on the outside of walls. Plan on changing as you see fit. What works and want doesn’t is best figured out first hand.

Great advice – I will definitely keep this in mind

View davidcl64's profile

davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


#8 posted 07-16-2020 04:20 PM



As far as the comment about showing off your conceptual skill drawing or gloating I think that was a bit strong. I ve got a son in law who is a mechanical engineer and he d send me plans for a birdhouse measured to the 64th of an inch with a cad drawing just because that s how he does things. I d do a marginally legible drawing in pencil with a few measurements with question marks next to them. You re okay… wish I had those skills.

Thanks for that – not sure why some have the tendency to assume the worst in folks. I’m a software guy by trade so I do tend to gravitate towards those types of solutions. My first layout attempt was graph paper and cutouts though! I bet your son-in-law would have a quiet chuckle at the suggestion that my attempt at sketchup drawings was showing any great skill :D


I think you re looking for any suggestions from people who have wrestled with this dilemma and can offer any advice about how to do or not to do it.

Exactly!


That being said, I have a garrison shop above my garage that isn t attached to my house so I probably can offer little advice. But I ll take a stab at it. Dust gets EVERYWHERE. I think those people with high end dust collection mitigation and those ceiling filter devices probably have better luck but I ll bet they still see it.
If you have a small area that separates your shop from the house I can see where it will still infiltrate. I m wondering if one of the doors in that walk through area was an exterior door with rubber gasket. Sort of like you see in the grey, steel, exterior doors that they sell everywhere. Then open it minimally to go through to the living area. Just a thought. Like I said I ve never had to mitigate an issue like this other than to know that I ve given up on white wall that turn tan from dust in my shop. Good luck with it.
As I type this I can envision a sort of airlock. A small walkthrough hallway with a sealed door on the shop end and the house end with an air filtration device mounted on the ceiling that is left running while you re working. I dunno, just thinking our loud.

BTW… if you solve the problem, post some drawings on how you did it. It might help someone else ;-)

- Craftsman on the lake

Yes – ideally both the door to the house and the door to the shop will be well sealed. I had been toying with the idea of creating positive pressure in the space before opening the door to the shop using a filtered fan that can be switched on/off before opening that door.

View 23tony's profile

23tony

43 posts in 978 days


#9 posted 07-16-2020 04:31 PM

I don’t have the experience these other guys have, but it seems to me the finishing room option exposes the appliances to a lot of potential finish residue (especially if you do any spray finishing) & fumes.

Probably stating the obvious: Is it not an option to move the frezeer? You might find some better arrangements if you could put them elsewhere

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1261 posts in 536 days


#10 posted 07-16-2020 04:33 PM

I would build a small room in front of the door that covered the water heater. Then leave the rest open to layout.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View davidcl64's profile

davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


#11 posted 07-16-2020 04:36 PM



I don t have the experience these other guys have, but it seems to me the finishing room option exposes the appliances to a lot of potential finish residue (especially if you do any spray finishing) & fumes.

Good point!


Probably stating the obvious: Is it not an option to move the frezeer? You might find some better arrangements if you could put them elsewhere

- 23tony

It wasn’t originally obvious to me! :D I did starting thinking that a little this morning based on someone’s comment but I haven’t come up with any workable ideas yet. Would love to hear any suggestions no matter how creative!

View davidcl64's profile

davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


#12 posted 07-16-2020 04:40 PM



I would build a small room in front of the door that covered the water heater. Then leave the rest open to layout.

- LeeRoyMan

That makes sense. It would provide a little more space to the shop and, at the same time, keep the volume of the vestibule smaller. That might make it easer for some type of pressure system (or filter) to work.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

8990 posts in 2959 days


#13 posted 07-16-2020 04:46 PM



That being said, I have a garrison shop above my garage that isn t attached to my house so I probably can offer little advice. But I ll take a stab at it. Dust gets EVERYWHERE. I think those people with high end dust collection mitigation and those ceiling filter devices probably have better luck but I ll bet they still see it.
If you have a small area that separates your shop from the house I can see where it will still infiltrate. I m wondering if one of the doors in that walk through area was an exterior door with rubber gasket. Sort of like you see in the grey, steel, exterior doors that they sell everywhere. Then open it minimally to go through to the living area. Just a thought. Like I said I ve never had to mitigate an issue like this other than to know that I ve given up on white wall that turn tan from dust in my shop. Good luck with it.
As I type this I can envision a sort of airlock. A small walkthrough hallway with a sealed door on the shop end and the house end with an air filtration device mounted on the ceiling that is left running while you re working. I dunno, just thinking our loud.

- Craftsman on the lake

The door that connects to the house should be gasketed if it’s up to current code. Can’t have air transfer between the garage and living spaces due to fumes nowadays. So, if he puts in an exterior door with a sweep and a threshold on the bottom, it should be fine.

Just make sure you put a good boot floor mat in there to knock the dust off the shoes before you go in the house. I have a detached shop and I’m still constantly getting yelled at for bringing in dust.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View davidcl64's profile

davidcl64

9 posts in 639 days


#14 posted 07-16-2020 04:52 PM



The door that connects to the house should be gasketed if it s up to current code. Can t have air transfer between the garage and living spaces due to fumes nowadays. So, if he puts in an exterior door with a sweep and a threshold on the bottom, it should be fine.

Just make sure you put a good boot floor mat in there to knock the dust off the shoes before you go in the house. I have a detached shop and I m still constantly getting yelled at for bringing in dust.

- jmartel

Adds to list: exterior door, sweep, threshold, boot mat. Also adding sign on door “Remove shoes before entering”

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14562 posts in 1947 days


#15 posted 07-16-2020 08:51 PM

I can’t tell from your layout but, is there somewhere you could put a door leading outside in both the shop and in an adjacent place in the living area? Maybe I’m oversimplifying (first time for everything) but then the great outdoors become your buffer and you don’t have to worry about airlock and positive pressure.

If that’s not possible, another though is a big ole badass blower in your shop that you could use before exiting to create a negative pressure in the shop and blow all the dust fines outdoors.

Otherwise, it wouldn’t be difficult to create a positive pressure in the vestibule. You could wire a blower in the ceiling (or wherever) to turn on when the lights are on and use a couple of limit or proximity switches on the door to ensure that the blower would only come on when the shop door was open and would not be able to come on when the living area door was open.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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