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Beveled router bit

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Forum topic by fartbutt posted 07-16-2020 01:02 AM 520 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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fartbutt

2 posts in 30 days


07-16-2020 01:02 AM

Do you guys prefer using a beveled router bit over a straight bit to edge trim laminate countertops. I hear there is more of a chance of chipping with a straight bit?


15 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3374 posts in 2303 days


#1 posted 07-16-2020 03:57 AM

Welcome to LumberJocks!

I like to use blue tape on edge board when I trim the top with straight cut flush bit, to leave it slightly proud and to keep any potential chip out away from edge. Then I remove the tape and use a bastard file with only downward strokes for final trim and bevel.

I use this slow, intentional, and time consuming method as I am a Klutz, and do not trim laminate more than a couple times a year. Have watched the professionals trim laminate, and always amazed how perfect it is with one pass of flush trim bit. sigh

FWIW – This topic is asked occasionally.
If you search the forums for laminate trimming methods, might find past threads on this topic, so you don’t have to wait for responses. :-)

Best Luck, and enjoy your stay with us.

Must say, That is an interesting screen name you picked. I like it.
Excuse me, could not hold that till I left the room. LOL

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Rich's profile

Rich

5720 posts in 1398 days


#2 posted 07-16-2020 04:32 AM


Do you guys prefer using a beveled router bit over a straight bit to edge trim laminate countertops. I hear there is more of a chance of chipping with a straight bit?

- fartbutt

I know exactly what you speak of. My father was a serious hobbyist starting in the ‘50s. He loved laminate and used it on pretty much everything he built.

You want both a beveled and straight bit if you intend to do a trim and then a top. You cut the trim with the straight bit, then use the beveled bit for the top. If you’re doing laminate on the top only, you don’t need the straight bit, just do the bevel around the top. You need to bevel the top edge to soften it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1261 posts in 536 days


#3 posted 07-16-2020 04:53 AM

rookies…lol

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1336 posts in 3892 days


#4 posted 07-16-2020 10:29 AM

“Back in the day” I just used a straight flush trim for everything I could and then a nice sharp double cut bastard file for everything I couldn’t get with the router. Then a single cut bastard for easing everything.

I’m a rookie though…lol!

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14562 posts in 1947 days


#5 posted 07-16-2020 12:57 PM

I don’t do laminate much but I have used it for shop tables and to make ZCIs for the table saw. So mine didn’t have to be pretty ;-) The straight bit I used to begin with turned out to have a cutter diameter .002” smaller than the bearing. IDK if that was a bad bit or if they are intentionally made that way? While .002 sounds negligible, you can feel it and it does make stuff catch on the edge. So ever since, I’ve used a beveled bit.

And yes, I am absolutely a rookie ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1260 posts in 1768 days


#6 posted 07-16-2020 01:30 PM

Most common in commercial shops..

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1261 posts in 536 days


#7 posted 07-16-2020 01:33 PM

Ken you have the perfect bit.
Most of my bits leave a small edge. I’ve had hundreds of those bits, and very few cut perfectly flush,
(could be they are getting smaller as I have them sharpened.)

After you trim the edge with the flush bit, clean any debris (glue and laminate particles) off with PT,
then use a “No-File” router bit. “No File” because if you set it to the right depth, you don’t have to touch it afterwards.
But I always take a swipe on the very top corner of the edge just to make sure there is no sharpness to it.

Never have file burn again.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14562 posts in 1947 days


#8 posted 07-16-2020 01:40 PM

Thanks LRM! That bit looks perfect for the final pass. Fortunately, I don’t do much laminate at all so I’ll hobble by with what I have for the time being. Should I ever have a project requiring much of it though, I’m better educated now :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

12221 posts in 4237 days


#9 posted 07-16-2020 01:41 PM

A treatment I used to do was to apply an oak, or similar edging to the surface to be laminated. Then, apply the laminate and trim the edge with a beveled bit revealing a small strip of the wood. Of course, there was a turn down on the front edge.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1261 posts in 536 days


#10 posted 07-17-2020 03:27 AM



A treatment I used to do was to apply an oak, or similar edging to the surface to be laminated. Then, apply the laminate and trim the edge with a beveled bit revealing a small strip of the wood. Of course, there was a turn down on the front edge.

- Gene Howe


Same here. Used to do that as they say, back in the day.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1261 posts in 536 days


#11 posted 07-17-2020 03:31 AM


Most common in commercial shops..

- JackDuren


I quit using those back in the 80’s.
Had to brush Crisco on the face to keep the bullet tip from burning the laminate. Then, most of the time ants would find the can of crisco.
None of my friends that have shops use them. Maybe low end production shops because they are cheap.
Don’t get me wrong they work, but No…..definitely not a go to bit for me.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View PPK's profile

PPK

1768 posts in 1618 days


#12 posted 07-17-2020 12:18 PM



“Back in the day” I just used a straight flush trim for everything I could and then a nice sharp double cut bastard file for everything I couldn t get with the router. Then a single cut bastard for easing everything.

I m a rookie though…lol!

- Tony_S

This is what I do. I bearing flush trim bit, not the “bullet end” ones, although I used to use those. I used vaseline instead of Crisco though!

And then after flush trimming I’d do a chamfer if that was the preferred style.

-- Pete

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JackDuren

1260 posts in 1768 days


#13 posted 07-17-2020 12:56 PM

Problem with the bearing bits is debris and glue getting in and around the bearing causing burns from a locked beating. This happenss a lot in large Comercial shops using them all day.
Just check it each time.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1261 posts in 536 days


#14 posted 07-20-2020 03:15 PM


Problem with the bearing bits is debris and glue getting in and around the bearing causing burns from a locked beating. This happenss a lot in large Comercial shops using them all day.
Just check it each time.

- JackDuren

I run my bits a tad lower and make sure they’re clean.
If you keep the laminate overhang to a minimum there is not as much build up.

Here is one of my very well used typical trim bits. (Grabbed “as is” out of the router box)
You can see the level it hits the laminate. No glue build up at all under the bearing.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View realcowtown_eric's profile

realcowtown_eric

638 posts in 2746 days


#15 posted 07-27-2020 02:29 AM

I too use striaght bits, and a swipe of vaseline just in case the bearings jam up with glue. Also makes clean-up easier. Edges are draw filed to the point where finger nails don’t catch. Draw filing also allows a quick stroke to take off any sharp edge.

Water bsed contact” seems to sell the wood a touch, and then it shrinks back methinks, leaving a little overhang, so you have to double check a day or two later for that

I personally think bevels are ugly and so retro

Eric

-- Real_cowtown_eric

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