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Forum topic by gmaffPappy posted 07-14-2020 09:28 PM 320 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gmaffPappy

87 posts in 2836 days


07-14-2020 09:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Has anyone ever run 240V 50hz European tools on US 220V 60hz?

I’m considering getting a tools shipped to me from Germany, but I’m concerned about the power requirements.

My thoughts….
1. It will run fine. The machines are built with +/- %10 tolerances.
2. I’ll need to purchase a power converter to run the machine.,
3. I’ll need to order a new power controller for the machine?
4. This is just a really, really bad idea, and I should just drop the thought from my head!

-- If it's easy to do, you haven't spent enough time over engineering it.


8 replies so far

View Dajur's profile

Dajur

36 posts in 65 days


#1 posted 07-14-2020 09:59 PM

I think that it is a bad idea, and you should get the thought from your head. If I recall correctly, increasing the hz will increase the HP and motor speed beyond what it is rated for, and it will probably wear out really quickly. However, I am not an electrical engineer, so take what I just said with several grains of salt.

Here is a 50hz-60hz FAQ I found.

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SMP

2250 posts in 710 days


#2 posted 07-14-2020 10:43 PM

#5 increase your fire insurance coverage.

View Jerroni's profile

Jerroni

11 posts in 800 days


#3 posted 07-14-2020 10:50 PM

There are frequency converters. A pricey example is GoHz

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3178 posts in 2603 days


#4 posted 07-14-2020 10:59 PM

Isn’t most stuff from Europe 3ph. I do know that the single phase motor on my bandsaw is Italian. It’s is designed to run here in the USA but the start capacitor is very unique and expensive to replace.
Something I didn’t even consider when I bought it.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Torr's profile

Torr

25 posts in 3451 days


#5 posted 07-14-2020 11:18 PM

Like many things it depends on the specifics. For example, if it is a simple bandsaw with nothing more in terms of controls than a power switch, and the motor is dual rated for 240/50 and 220/60 You might be fine with doing nothing if the increased blade speed works for you application. Or you might need to change the motor pulley to result in the same blade speed.

On the other hand if the motor is not dual rated or you have other controls components to deal with like transformers, contactors, motor starters, overloads, etc. you may find yourself with a much more complex situation that would make it difficult to ensure it is electrically and mechanically safe and will function properly when run at the different line voltage/frequency.

Tough to judge without getting into the details.

Just my opinion, YMMV.

Torr

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3352 posts in 2299 days


#6 posted 07-15-2020 04:52 AM

Like many things it depends on the specifics. For example, if it is a simple bandsaw with nothing more in terms of controls than a power switch, and the motor is dual rated for 240/50 and 220/60 You might be fine with doing nothing if the increased blade speed works for you application. Or you might need to change the motor pulley to result in the same blade speed.

On the other hand if the motor is not dual rated or you have other controls components to deal with like transformers, contactors, motor starters, overloads, etc. you may find yourself with a much more complex situation that would make it difficult to ensure it is electrically and mechanically safe and will function properly when run at the different line voltage/frequency.

Tough to judge without getting into the details.

Just my opinion, YMMV.

Torr

- Torr

+1 Too many variables to offer yes/no answer.

If we know the tool, and can read the mfg data sheet; then we can help specifically.

Many newer small hand tools are multi-rated, and if they are not; higher chance that something needs changed inside (like electronic speed control, or capacitors) to make work.

Large industrial equipment designed for 50Hz can be expensive challenge to convert to 60Hz. Especially if the motors are not wound to handle differences in heat dissipation with change in frequency, and need all new motors.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View gmaffPappy's profile

gmaffPappy

87 posts in 2836 days


#7 posted 07-15-2020 08:22 AM

Thanks for the insight, All.

The machine was a Single Phase MiniMax Elite or Hammer A3-41.

As it turns out, I’m not going to have to go that route. Until last night, that looked like the the only option for me to go. With COVID, everyone and their neighbor has 1. taken up woodworking and 2. bought up every Hammer and MiniMax J/P on the continent. With the factories shut down. Best estimates put the factories back at 100% in maybe six months.

I found a few machines in Europe, all only set up for German power.

Good news! Last night, I found one, on a shipping container, bound for the US. I’ve put my payment down, and will be getting a new MM Elite in a few weeks.

-- If it's easy to do, you haven't spent enough time over engineering it.

View MichaelTT's profile

MichaelTT

20 posts in 891 days


#8 posted 07-15-2020 01:28 PM

They will run just fine.

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