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Forum topic by Sangma posted 07-11-2020 08:33 PM 606 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sangma

9 posts in 33 days


07-11-2020 08:33 PM

I am new to woodworking and obviously new to this forum, but hope to learn so much from you experts.
Lately, I have been collecting some tools and now, thinking of buying a table saw. First of all, availability of table saws in India are extremely limited and few on sale are 3 times expensive than the US or elsewhere. Like the Bosh GTS 10J and Dewalt DW745 are around $860-900 (Rs.65,000/-). However, there are local or probably, Chinese imports which are heavy and cost the same…I was wondering if anyone has used any of these things (picture attached) or will they be better than Bosch GTS 10 J or Dewalt DW745? They are made of cast iron and weigh 237 kilograms or 522 lbs. My only concerns are precision and efficiency…

I will be extremely thankful for your help and guidance. Thanks



18 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1705 posts in 3658 days


#1 posted 07-12-2020 10:34 AM

Sangma, welcome to LJ’s

I had never heard of Jai before your post, I went to their site and WOW, just WOW, the product line is impressive and reading the company story that they’ve been in business since 1965 would lead me to think that they build pretty good machines.

Seeing the product line they clearly lean towards the commercial and industrial applications, yet also show smaller equipment that could work in a personal woodworking shop. To answer your question YES the pictured saw will be significantly better than any jobsite/workbench table saw. I cannot speak to the financial side but if the Jai saw is comparably priced to a Bosch or Dewalt jobsite saw I would buy the Jai saw. Many woodworkers start small with a jobsite saw until they grow their skills to realize that the jobsite saw is limiting to certain projects, and a stationary heavy cabinet saw is a woodworkers lifetime saw.

The one item that really sticks out to me is the capacity of the saw given the small size of the top and the short front fence rail it looks like there may only be 18” of capacity between the fence and the blade. I didn’t download their catalog since they’re asking for my info, but I would guess that they have optional accessories to put more table and fence rail to right of the blade which would be very valuable to you if you go with one of their saws.

Please keep us posted and if you do go with the Jai saw many of us will look forward to you sharing information of how the saw is working for you.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

1831 posts in 356 days


#2 posted 07-12-2020 11:08 AM

A few things I noticed about that saw you post a photo of:

1. I dont see any power emergency stop. Shoud be in front, where you stand, and easily triggered with a knee if need be. This alone would prohibit me from buying it.

2. The guide rail for the fence doesnt extend to the left past the blade. Maybe there is an upgrade? And a sled could substitute

3. The mitre gauge looks flimsy, and is likely not very accurate. Hard to tell quality from the photo. That issue can be upgraded, of course. The mitre slots appear to be standard, so thats a plus.

4. The fence itself also looks sub-standard, but that can also be upgraded.

5. The blade guard looks very weak, which would imply that the riving knife is also.

The adjustment wheels for height and angle look solid, that a definite plus. On the Bosch it is a lever-lock type of thing to set the angle, that is irritating to adjust.

Strange that there is no throat plate shown in the photo???

I have the Bosch GTS10 XC, live in Spain, and bought it for about the same price as you quote, but that was including the gravity stand, so I dont think those prices are terribly high. It is a quality item, and worth the cost, IMO.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3374 posts in 2303 days


#3 posted 07-12-2020 11:20 AM

Welcome to LumberJocks!

Not an expert, just a Klutz, trying to help:

- In USA, we don’t get much exposure to many of the internal brands of tools made in India.
The strong business of the big OEM, and their use of world wide contract manufacturers; prevents most mfg private brands from entering the US directly due no-competion clauses in sourcing agreements.

For example, Harvey Industires in China was barely known 5-10 years ago, even thought they produced tools for many OEM (Powermatic, Laguna, Grizzly, Steel City, etc). Since the addition of China tariffs and US OEM moving out of China, the contracts with Harvey expired; which let Harvey attempt to enter the US market with Table saw, band saw, and lathes. They are the exception right now, as history has records of Taiwan mfg attempting to sell direct in US when OEM moved to China as cost saving 2-3 decades ago. None survived. The same has never happened for any tools from India?

- I have been around a lot of different machine tools in my profession. I have even seen the Jai Max brand tools installed in Mexico plants I supported. Mostly saw the belt/disc sanding tools. Also had some WudPro Prima brand Tenioners/Dovetail machines. Believe Jai produces the J-634 picture you posted?
https://www.jaiindustries.com/wudpro-flyer-2020.pdf
https://www.jaiindustries.com/prima-catalog.pdf
Regardless, few have had my exposure to commercial tools.

SO If you want advice on specific tools made locally and how the compare to US OEM tools, you will need to share some websites and model numbers so we can look them up!

For example, the J-634 looks like a beefy tool. My only concern is the tube style fence rail. They tend to be more temperamental than Biesemeyer T-Square style found in US. But at same time, tube fence rails are commonly used on low to mid-range sliding table saws (often called panel saw) sold by European OEM (maybe made in India? lol), and they work just fine. If you compare the J-634, to the US job site saws, the Jai looks more stable and likely more accurate too. So if you have space, and power for one; why not buy it over the expensive import brand?

If you are looking for a smaller job site saw like DW745, would think you be interested in Ferm Tools. Have seen a few FERM hand tools in UK facility I worked with. Noticed Ferm makes a job site saw on UK review sites. Have no information if they are any good. Just showing there are options, but it takes a lot of time to dig them up. :-0)
Such as: https://ferm-diy.com/en/table-saw-1800w-250mm.html

If you want advice on what tools are better for YOU, suggest you also post information on your project plans, or work shop needs. This will also help others to provide advice targeted towards your goals. Otherwise you might get a recommendation for shop full of top of the line professional tools!

One last suggestion:
Check out KnotScott’s The ABCs of Table Saws blog post for some education on saw types.

Hope this helps, and best luck on your search.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Sangma's profile

Sangma

9 posts in 33 days


#4 posted 07-12-2020 01:40 PM

Wow! A great forum. Never expected a reply, but just wow.
Okay, first of all, Jai happens to be India’s number one OEM of such products. It also costs $70 less than the Bosch. As far as rip capacity, fence and miter gauge are concerned, they can be upgraded with some DIY projects. In fact, I was thinking of doing it by cutting out the upgrades from wood on CNC machine (paid service)...So, precision should not be an issue. My main concern was precision of the main piece out of the box, which seems almost answered by you guys… Standard miter gauge is another plus that I did not know…
I have a catalogue in PDF, but don’t know how to upload it

View Sangma's profile

Sangma

9 posts in 33 days


#5 posted 07-12-2020 01:58 PM

My projects will be mostly drum (percussion) shells which will need perfect bevel cuts…As of now, I am just considering J634 table saw. But in the future, I will buy their jointer and thickness planner combi machines like J1015 or J702 (pictures attached)

For a reference, here is Jai Wudpro website.
https://www.jaiindustries.com/solid-wood.html

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3187 posts in 2607 days


#6 posted 07-12-2020 02:28 PM

The jointer with a circular saw blade between the operator and fed path that’s my kind of machine.
Very dangerous I like it. :)

-- Aj

View Sangma's profile

Sangma

9 posts in 33 days


#7 posted 07-12-2020 02:33 PM



The jointer with a circular saw blade between the operator and fed path that’s my kind of machine.
Very dangerous I like it. :)

- Aj2

Well, I don’t intend to use that blade…Will keep it off…But for an industrial jointer and thickness planer of ‘13 inch and 7 inch’ the price is great. It’s around $800.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5872 posts in 3118 days


#8 posted 07-12-2020 04:30 PM

Apparently they don’t take safety like the US and Europe. It seems the adjustment of fences is a little crude. The saw blade on the planer/jointer seems odd to me. Most European machines have a chuck on the end of the cutter shaft for slot a mortising.

Here’s the video

https://youtu.be/q2o95HCGHuE

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Sangma's profile

Sangma

9 posts in 33 days


#9 posted 07-12-2020 04:49 PM

That is why I am confused. I developed my interest in woodworking by watching youtube woodworkers, almost all of whom are ‘Americans and Europeans’. They all use pupular brands’ products that I have crossed checked countless times…So, these Indian and Chinese machines appeared odd to me…No reviews, no forum discussion, no clear information…
Honestly, I am confused as my budget is limited…and the bigger brands are just off the limit…

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3187 posts in 2607 days


#10 posted 07-12-2020 05:47 PM

Every combination machine I’ve seen even the super expensive ones have a trade off. Sure you save space but sacrifice something.
I believe in separating the machines unless your basically work out of a broom closet. :)
All my machines are separate
Good Luck buy local.

One more point I’d like to make. YouTube woodworking is not a good representation of real woodworking I’ll even go as far to say 90% is garbage. The main goal of youtubers is get views and what they parrot you will learn without anybody teaching you. You will learn from doing.
So try not to be heavily influenced from the internet and look to the wood for guidance. Nature is the best teacher

-- Aj

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5872 posts in 3118 days


#11 posted 07-12-2020 05:59 PM



Every combination machine I’ve seen even the super expensive ones have a trade off. Sure you save space but sacrifice something.
I believe in separating the machines unless your basically work out of a broom closet. :)
All my machines are separate
Good Luck buy local.

One more point I’d like to make. YouTube woodworking is not a good representation of real woodworking I’ll even go as far to say 90% is garbage. The main goal of youtubers is get views and what they parrot you will learn without anybody teaching you. You will learn from doing.
So try not to be heavily influenced from the internet and look to the wood for guidance. Nature is the best teacher

- Aj2


I suppose your right there are going to be some kind of trade off. I love my Felder jointer/planer. There are some advantage too. Perfect is pretty hard to come my.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Sangma's profile

Sangma

9 posts in 33 days


#12 posted 07-19-2020 07:46 PM

Ordered the 3hp table saw for 51k Indian Rupees (around USD 700) all inclusive and asked them to check the following thoroughly:
1. Perfectly flat surface. (They say that the cast iron plate is flattened on metal planers and cnc)
2. Perfect 90 degree corners.
3. Perfectly aligned blade to the table and the miter slots.
4. Perfect fence.
Their response and open to requests are great till now. Hope the machine turns out as expected.
Will post it once received.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1053 posts in 3308 days


#13 posted 07-20-2020 03:40 PM

” My projects will be mostly drum (percussion) shells which will need perfect bevel cuts…”

Do you mean some kind of cooperage?

Unless you plan to make a living out of it, are you sure you need to spend thousands of Rupees on machinery?
People have been doing hand tool wood working for centuries.
99% can be done with about 10 hand tools.
Take some time to visit the Paul Sellers web sites.
(the only machine he speaks about is a bandsaw which is not at all essential for the great majority of work)

nice video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GE7QA1chUzw

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Sangma's profile

Sangma

9 posts in 33 days


#14 posted 07-20-2020 04:00 PM


” My projects will be mostly drum (percussion) shells which will need perfect bevel cuts…”

Do you mean some kind of cooperage?

Unless you plan to make a living out of it, are you sure you need to spend thousands of Rupees on machinery?
People have been doing hand tool wood working for centuries.
99% can be done with about 10 hand tools.
Take some time to visit the Paul Sellers web sites.

nice video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GE7QA1chUzw

- Sylvain

That is one inspiring video indeed. Loved everything about it and certainly, his skills are extraordinary…In my case, I will have to depend much on power tools as I am not that skilled and I need to finish my projects faster. But again, a great video that I will not forget.

View typing's profile

typing

26 posts in 394 days


#15 posted 07-25-2020 05:02 AM




Something is really strange about this table saw. The rail go from the middle to the right. That itself is not a problem. The rails on mine span the full width of the saw but in many years I have never even a single once moved the fence to the left of the blade. However the saw on the photo is right tilting. So if you tilt the blade it may pinch the wood to the fence and shoot it in your direction.

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