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"Bump" near end of routed pieces?

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Forum topic by Niuhi posted 07-08-2020 11:46 AM 649 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Niuhi

5 posts in 32 days


07-08-2020 11:46 AM

Topic tags/keywords: router question

Aloha All -

I’m a brand new woodworker on my first project – a crib for our new grandson. (Yes, I know what some of you are thinking about a crib as a first project, but now I’m committed!) I found LOTS of helpful posts here on LumberJocks in the past when I was researching tools, workshop organization, mallets, etc. and felt the are many responsive, helpful, experienced folks here who might be willing to provide some advice, so here goes. (I could not find a prior question about this issue, so please pardon me if I missed previous answers to this question.)

Currently I am routing (beveling) 36 slats for the crib sides from hard maple on an inexpensive Bosch router table using a 60-degree bevel bit. Near the end of each piece in the routed/beveled area is a slight bump/bulge. It appears to occur at the bit about where the first end of the piece hits the fence on the left side of the bit.

What am I doing wrong or missing, please?

I could sand out these bumps, but I don’t relish doing that 72 times if I can fix the problem up front. :)

Thanks in advance for your advice!

-- Niuhi


22 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1700 posts in 3654 days


#1 posted 07-08-2020 11:57 AM

Looks like you might have the fence off a bit.

Set your router bit for height, and then take a straight stick of your stock and set the fence(s) so that they are either flush or a 1/32 ahead of the bearing. When set this way, the bearing is eliminated from the process and you’re just using the fences and should not have any odd cuts as the stock enter or leaves the bit.

Welcome to LJ’s and I’m sad to say you’ve still got a boatload of sanding ahead of you, other than elves, none of us have solved that issue yet.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View SMP's profile

SMP

2250 posts in 710 days


#2 posted 07-08-2020 02:04 PM

I would do what was mentioned above with the fences. However if you still get it, try doing a slightly shallower pass, then a final “skim” pass, that should clear it up as there will be less pressure moving rhe piece around.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5689 posts in 1394 days


#3 posted 07-08-2020 02:17 PM


I m a brand new woodworker on my first project – a crib for our new grandson. (Yes, I know what some of you are thinking about a crib as a first project, but now I m committed!)

- Niuhi

I’ve been one of the most vocal on that topic. In fact, while I have over 5 decades of experience in the shop, I recently turned down a request from a good friend to build a crib for his daughter who is due in a few months. I’m simply not willing to risk it because there are so many safety factors to consider.

Do a dresser or changing station instead.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View pottz's profile

pottz

10326 posts in 1789 days


#4 posted 07-08-2020 06:21 PM



Looks like you might have the fence off a bit.

Set your router bit for height, and then take a straight stick of your stock and set the fence(s) so that they are either flush or a 1/32 ahead of the bearing. When set this way, the bearing is eliminated from the process and you re just using the fences and should not have any odd cuts as the stock enter or leaves the bit.

Welcome to LJ s and I m sad to say you ve still got a boatload of sanding ahead of you, other than elves, none of us have solved that issue yet.

- ChefHDAN


ditto,ive had that problem and it was always a fence issue.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2553 posts in 3443 days


#5 posted 07-08-2020 07:26 PM


I ve been one of the most vocal on that topic. In fact, while I have over 5 decades of experience in the shop, I recently turned down a request from a good friend to build a crib for his daughter who is due in a few months. I m simply not willing to risk it because there are so many safety factors to consider.

Do a dresser or changing station instead.

- Rich

Dressers and changing tables have safety issues too.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5689 posts in 1394 days


#6 posted 07-08-2020 08:05 PM


Dressers and changing tables have safety issues too.

- Ocelot

True, but at least they’re (hopefully) not left unattended on one.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View SMP's profile

SMP

2250 posts in 710 days


#7 posted 07-08-2020 08:50 PM


Dressers and changing tables have safety issues too.

- Ocelot

True, but at least they re (hopefully) not left unattended on one.

- Rich

Agree, when our children were young there were always safety recalls on cribs. All kinds of things can happen that you wouldn’t even think of until you read the recalls.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2553 posts in 3443 days


#8 posted 07-08-2020 10:10 PM

Most of the problems involve small children climbing on the drawers and tipping the dresser or changing table over onto themselves.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1461 posts in 1393 days


#9 posted 07-08-2020 11:08 PM

I put feet that project out 3 or 4 in front to move the CG back a bit on childrens bookcases I’ve built. The tips are beveled to reduce toe stubs as well.

As for your Q, the infeed and outfeed fence sections are not aligned properly. Ideally the outfeed is offset by the depth of cut. Since the depth of cut is difficult to measure and compensate for, you can waste a lot of time and materials trying to get it dialed in perfectly.

Alternately you can treat it like planer snipe and just start long and cut the “snipe” off.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

871 posts in 984 days


#10 posted 07-08-2020 11:44 PM


I m a brand new woodworker on my first project – a crib for our new grandson. (Yes, I know what some of you are thinking about a crib as a first project, but now I m committed!)

- Niuhi

I ve been one of the most vocal on that topic. In fact, while I have over 5 decades of experience in the shop, I recently turned down a request from a good friend to build a crib for his daughter who is due in a few months. I m simply not willing to risk it because there are so many safety factors to consider.

Do a dresser or changing station instead.

- Rich

I’m right there with you. Same for bunk beds.

Some bedroom manufacturers won’t touch either because of insurance and fear of getting sued.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

871 posts in 984 days


#11 posted 07-08-2020 11:51 PM



Most of the problems involve small children climbing on the drawers and tipping the dresser or changing table over onto themselves.

- Ocelot

Every NS, dresser, chest I make leaves with an anti tip package and a safety sticker on back for this reason

View pottz's profile

pottz

10326 posts in 1789 days


#12 posted 07-09-2020 12:37 AM



I put feet that project out 3 or 4 in front to move the CG back a bit on childrens bookcases I ve built. The tips are beveled to reduce toe stubs as well.

As for your Q, the infeed and outfeed fence sections are not aligned properly. Ideally the outfeed is offset by the depth of cut. Since the depth of cut is difficult to measure and compensate for, you can waste a lot of time and materials trying to get it dialed in perfectly.

Alternately you can treat it like planer snipe and just start long and cut the “snipe” off.

- Madmark2


i think ill disagree with that mark i have a jointech smart fence system and the fence is solid so the out feed and infeed are in perfect alignment,the only time i have that problem is if the fence is set back too much and the wood is rising off the bearing rather than the fence.,just as chefdan stated.it’s as simple adjustment to solve the problem.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5863 posts in 3114 days


#13 posted 07-09-2020 12:49 AM

Deleted

If forgot you are removing the whole edge. Yes you just need to get the fences aligned properly

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Jackryan's profile

Jackryan

19 posts in 2681 days


#14 posted 07-09-2020 01:56 AM

Adjust the fence or shim the offending fence , use a scrap piece to check and shim again as needed. Always use a test piece first.

-- Dave, Wi.

View BB1's profile

BB1

1656 posts in 1653 days


#15 posted 07-09-2020 02:04 AM

Could the opening in fence be too wide, allowing the piece to drop into the opening as it is pushed the last few inches? More of a question to the group than an answer to the original question as I’m on the uphill side of the learning curve.

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