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Anyone heard of making knives from tablesaw blade bodies?

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Forum topic by jonah posted 07-01-2020 07:24 PM 1116 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jonah

2124 posts in 4107 days


07-01-2020 07:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: knife making sawblades

What kind of steel are tablesaw blades made out of?

My brother in law is trying to make knives out of worn out, not-worth-resharpening tablesaw blades.

Anyone heard of such a thing?

My instinct is that it’s not going to be a good knife-making steel, but the blank he showed me seemed fine.

I’d think that because its not actually the steel that does any of the work in sawblades, that manufacturers would cheap out on that as much as possible and it’d be too soft for a good knife.


17 replies so far

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Fresch

494 posts in 2729 days


#1 posted 07-01-2020 07:35 PM

Only way to tell is to heat and quench to see if it hardens. My guess is yes good for knife making.

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HokieKen

14562 posts in 1947 days


#2 posted 07-01-2020 07:36 PM

Old saw blades that don’t have carbide teeth will be HSS or tool steel and can be used to make blades. HSS isn’t ideal for knife making because it’s hard to work and can’t easily be annealed and re-hardened. If the blade is tool steel, it’s better than HSS because it can be annealed and re-hardened pretty easily.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1121 posts in 3093 days


#3 posted 07-01-2020 07:44 PM

John Heisz on YouTube has made a few blades from old saw blades. I’m sure you can find the videos if you search his channel.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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jonah

2124 posts in 4107 days


#4 posted 07-01-2020 07:53 PM

He’s using carbide-tipped blades but not using the teeth, just the blade body itself.

Thanks for the tip on John Heisz, I’ll pass that along.

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HokieKen

14562 posts in 1947 days


#5 posted 07-01-2020 08:47 PM

Carbide tipped saw blades most likely have mild steel plates. I won’t swear to it but I don’t know why they would use high-carbon steel where it won’t be doing any cutting.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View SMP's profile

SMP

2268 posts in 714 days


#6 posted 07-01-2020 09:04 PM

They would be pretty thin, unless thats what you are going for for marking knives etc. Better off using old files like some guys do for the thickness.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4812 posts in 2797 days


#7 posted 07-01-2020 09:12 PM

I would want to have an idea of the grade of steel that I was using to get the most out of it and best heat treatment.

You can buy all kinds of knife steel and not overly expensive.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14562 posts in 1947 days


#8 posted 07-01-2020 09:58 PM

Google “steel spark test”. It’s not hard to identify high carbon steel with a grinder.

Like Redoak said, you can get 1095 steel at very reasonable prices.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5677 posts in 2196 days


#9 posted 07-01-2020 10:40 PM

I found this spark test video pretty helpful.

I saw an episode of How it’s Made where they use used up large saw mill blades (circular saw not band) to make knives. They cut out the blanks using a water jet. The coolest part is that they used a hardening technique that only heated the edge using torches so the large saw blades must be some sort of high carbon steel. Pretty cool episode.

The coolest reuse of a table saw blade that I have seen was to make a carbide parting tool. Basically they just cut a strip that included one carbide tooth and added scales for a handle.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1211 posts in 1359 days


#10 posted 07-02-2020 12:14 AM

My uncle makes them from old band saw blades. Not sure how big the bandsaw is but the blade is around a inch and a eight wide. I haven’t used the one he gave me much but I’ve skinned a squirrel with it and sharpened it up. Takes a nice edge. He puts the edge on the toothed side.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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Woodknack

13442 posts in 3189 days


#11 posted 07-02-2020 01:27 AM



Carbide tipped saw blades most likely have mild steel plates. I won t swear to it but I don t know why they would use high-carbon steel where it won t be doing any cutting.

- HokieKen

Because mild steel would bend and warp when they got hot. Quality blades are hardened and tensioned so they have some toughness and springiness. I have a good link on how blades are made but I’m on mobile so I’ll have to post it later.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Woodknack

13442 posts in 3189 days


#12 posted 07-02-2020 01:28 AM

Jonah, here is one I made from a carbide Delta blade. I still use it and it’s a great knife.

Click for details

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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HokieKen

14562 posts in 1947 days


#13 posted 07-02-2020 01:37 AM

I stand corrected :-)

I would like to see that link as well Rick if you remember to post it.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13442 posts in 3189 days


#14 posted 07-02-2020 04:30 AM



I stand corrected :-)

I would like to see that link as well Rick if you remember to post it.

- HokieKen

http://carbideprocessors.com/pages/saw-blades/steel-saw-plate.html

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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therealSteveN

5963 posts in 1383 days


#15 posted 07-02-2020 06:17 AM

Possibly not optimal metal for knife blades, but certainly doable. I’ve found the used up hand saw blades to make awesome edge tools for scratch stock, probably a wee bit thin for all but the smallest of knives though. Cutting either isn’t hard with the correct tools, doesn’t take long to work an edge, see what happens.

Kenny brings up the part where some education, or learning is important. It’s not much to work an edge. It is something though to end up with a hardness that allows that edge to last.

-- Think safe, be safe

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