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Forum topic by Holbs posted 06-30-2020 09:51 PM 473 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Holbs

2346 posts in 2806 days


06-30-2020 09:51 PM

There should be a discussion about 3D Printing in the work shop, centralized. I call all those who 3D Print to post their opinions of their machines, what has been printed with pix, pro’s/con’s of this or that.
I am in the market for a beginner (<$500) 3D Printer as I am really getting into the home security / home automation arena and such a DIY machine would be highly beneficial for custom / replacement parts.
Which, of course, led me into wood working uses as well. Lots of posts around LJ’s but scattered. I did walk around my wood shop, took a gander at and thought of what plastic (I admit…not too clear on WHAT plastic materials are available) parts could be of use. Lots of lots of little things such as clamp protectors, zero clearance throat plates, knobs/handles, those odd sized Bosch dust collection adapters, etc.
Looking at beginner types of 3D Printers such as Ender 3 (I do see there is a Ender 5 that is now out) and the Monoprice Voxel. One is 2 post framed, one is 4 post framed, one is enclosed. Not sure of the differences yet.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"


30 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4748 posts in 2766 days


#1 posted 07-01-2020 10:52 AM

I am with you and have been looking into it. I need to learn a bit of Fusion360 but think I could do that. There are so many designs available out there.

Right now my son has a good one and will print things for me.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

1020 posts in 1418 days


#2 posted 07-01-2020 11:10 AM

Maybe Lazyman can jump on here. I believe he 3d printed an entire dust collector cyclone in stages.

I haven’t gotten into 3d printing but it certainly seems like a good complimentary skill to go along with other types of craft work. Prototyping, jigs, forms/molds, bits of unique hardware…

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

4727 posts in 1598 days


#3 posted 07-02-2020 04:10 AM

I’ve incorporated 3D printing in my workshop for quite a few years now… Have written a few articles about my experience… One thing that needs to be considered is having to learn a design language… after all an image of Yoda is bugger all use in the workshop other than gathering sawdust.

If you are mechanically minded, I believe they are not that hard to build and can be relatively inexpensive… I’m not mechanically minded and bought my 1st. one without considering bed size. While probably 95% of my needs could be handled by my 135mm x 135mm bed, I have found that an extra 50-60mm extra was invaluable… I now have 2 printers.

I use SketchUp to design my stuff though I believe Fusion 360 may be a better choice (I’m too bloody old and lazy to learn it).

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

419 posts in 3859 days


#4 posted 07-02-2020 06:21 PM

I use a 3D printer to build clocks. It has opened up a new world of possibilities to create complex shapes that are difficult to build in a wood shop.

My printer is a Prusa MK3 with a print area around 210×250x210mm. It is a great printer in the $800 price range. There are also plenty of printers in the $400-500 range that get good reviews and also some in the $200-300 range that may be good enough. The cheaper printers supposedly need some extra hand holding to get a good print. I only have experience with the Prusa and it has produced excellent results.

-- Steve

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JohnMcClure

1020 posts in 1418 days


#5 posted 07-03-2020 12:00 AM

Steve P, thank you for sharing that. I may have to buy and learn a Prusa once my new shop is built. Clock making has long been a dream of mine.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

989 posts in 2426 days


#6 posted 07-03-2020 12:26 AM

But I do not think you can print wood. This is a woodworking forum. There are other forums dedicated to 3D printing where you can get much broader advice just as Lumberjacks will give better experience in woodwork than a plastic forum.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14079 posts in 1916 days


#7 posted 07-03-2020 12:32 AM

3D printing has broad application and has been discussed at length where it pertains to woodworking. An excellent idea for a thread IMO.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

4727 posts in 1598 days


#8 posted 07-03-2020 02:27 AM


But I do not think you can print wood. This is a woodworking forum….
- tvrgeek

Not quite true, there are simulated wood filaments,

I’ve just never been forced to use it as I’ve never encountered any “plastic racism” before.

Furthermore, this post is a blog and not a project. 3D printing can be of great benefit in the workshop… just like welding, soldering and enjoying a beer after/during woodworking… should they all be banned.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3744 posts in 2946 days


#9 posted 07-03-2020 07:06 AM



But I do not think you can print wood. This is a woodworking forum. There are other forums dedicated to 3D printing where you can get much broader advice just as Lumberjacks will give better experience in woodwork than a plastic forum.

- tvrgeek

You can read on LJ also a lot about woodworking tools, and in my opinion 3D printing can be one of them.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3744 posts in 2946 days


#10 posted 07-03-2020 07:10 AM


I use SketchUp to design my stuff though I believe Fusion 360 may be a better choice (I m too bloody old and lazy to learn it).

- LittleBlackDuck

Have a look at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvrHuaHhqHI

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2346 posts in 2806 days


#11 posted 07-03-2020 07:14 AM

I’m not going to make a plastic flip top 13” planer cart with a 3D printer :) However, it will be a tool I use in my wood working shop for that always breaking 1” plastic handle or gear in that 13” planer.

I am leaning towards the Ender 3 Pro since the Ender 5 gives 10% benefit at 50% higher cost.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

4727 posts in 1598 days


#12 posted 07-03-2020 09:15 AM


I m not going to make a plastic flip top 13” planer cart with a 3D printer :) However,....
- Holbs

3D printing is a must for dust extraction connectors,


Have a look at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvrHuaHhqHI
- Dutchy

Thanks Dutchy... had a look, however, will stick with SketchUp, at least for the moment. They’re changing their licensing scheme, so I might have to surrender to my dark side!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View clagwell's profile

clagwell

250 posts in 570 days


#13 posted 07-03-2020 09:34 AM


3D printing is a must for dust extraction connectors,

- LittleBlackDuck

I certainly agree.

Jointer/Planer 4” to 6” adapter and threaded hose end:

Table saw 2.5” to 4” adapter:

DC inlet flange and threaded hose end:

Those were printed with a ANET A8, a very low cost printer kit. It has about an 8” x 8” build area. I wouldn’t recommend anything smaller. I’m already looking at 10×10 or even 12×12 for the next one.

-- Dave, Tippecanoe County, IN --- Is there a corollary to Beranek.s Law that applies to dust collection?

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4748 posts in 2766 days


#14 posted 07-03-2020 10:50 AM

PLEASE STOP POSTING ABOUT 3D PRINTERS!!!!!

I want one so bad and have started with the YouTube tutorials on Fusion 360. I think I can sneak the cost last the CFO.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2346 posts in 2806 days


#15 posted 07-03-2020 01:26 PM



Jointer/Planer 4” to 6” adapter and threaded hose end:
DC inlet flange and threaded hose end:

3D printers can do threads? I was unaware of this. Or maybe never thought was possible. Really opens some “oh my” doors :)

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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