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Cantilevered Pergola/Lean To Privacy Fence

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Forum topic by Biddles posted 06-28-2020 08:29 PM 730 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Biddles

24 posts in 1224 days


06-28-2020 08:29 PM

Hi folks. I’m planning to build a Cantilevered Pergola/Lean To Privacy Fence up against the side of the deck. We just got a hot tub, and I’m waiting for wood to start the deck, but the privacy structure is something that I’m trying to plan out now as well. I want to butt up to the edge of the deck, and run length wise down the side so the entire right side of the deck won’t need railings, but I want a roof to protect the hot tub from the sap that drops off the pine tree’s behind it, and shield it from the elements at the same time creating privacy for me and my lady. It will also hopefully provide some extra shade, and down the other side it can cover the BBQ area so I can grill year round.

I only plan on using three posts along the side of the deck. They will be 6×6x12, on 12” piers 3’ into the ground and secured with Simpson hardware. Now this picture is the closest I can find to what I want to build but with an additional post, and roof. I like the support he added to the back of the posts, I feel that strengthens it greatly.

Except I want the metal roofing from this picture…

And in between the posts I love this style of privacy.

My main concern however is strength to hold everything together, and this first picture seems to be designed very well, however he didn’t notch any cross support beam he simply lag bolted it in as can be seen here… I know the hardware these days is much improved, but I feel two bolts just isn’t enough.

Should I notch out the top of the 6×6 and put a 4×4 length wise bolted in? How would you build this? We don’t typically get crazy storms here in New York, but I want to make sure this is built solid. I plan for the metal roofing to stick out at least 8ft in order to cover the hot tub, but I’m not sure of the lean angle yet.


24 replies so far

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3397 posts in 4246 days


#1 posted 06-28-2020 08:48 PM

I’d notch and bolt the wood on the rear beams. Wouldn’t be too much difficulty to do it. The bolts alone might hold but it’s not the recommended way to put beams together.

That being said, if you’re in NY did you consider the snow load on that roof? I live in Maine and have built covered pergolas (with four legs) and still I sweat it.

You could place bolted on Supports on the front ends of the roof, installed in the fall before the snow arrives.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

887 posts in 988 days


#2 posted 06-28-2020 09:53 PM

The first pic looks destined to fail. Especially if you put a roof on it.

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tmasondarnell

134 posts in 2598 days


#3 posted 06-29-2020 12:39 AM

Best practice (and in many places code) is to notch the beams or to used an engineered hanger.

I would definitely notch the beams. I may be a bit of a belt and suspenders man when it comes to construction, but I am a firm believer that fasteners should one fasten and near carry a load. I always want the load to be carried by the actual structural members.

I am a little concerned about the depth of your posts and the possible sheer force on that roof. You are essentially building a giant sail. Are the beams going to be fastened to the deck for additional lateral stability?

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Biddles

24 posts in 1224 days


#4 posted 06-29-2020 02:58 AM

I did not plan on fastening the posts to the deck, but Im not completely ruling it out. I would prefer this structure supported itself. I was planning on notching in lower lateral support, and notching in the upper lateral support beam. The roof angle will be sloped, not flat, just not as steep as the second pictures angle. But this is why I’m here, to get some advice on building this strong enough that I can sleep at night without worries.

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CWWoodworking

887 posts in 988 days


#5 posted 06-29-2020 03:16 AM

Notch it and make a steel plate to go over the joint. Repaint the plate as needed to keep from rusting. Or use stainless. This may get you some years of use, but it will probably still fail.

History tells us unsupported, not Trussed wood structures measuring 8’ out don’t fare well. There simply aren’t any that are old.

Here’s an idea. Instead of a wood structure, have a metal fabricator(you if your inclined) do some cool cantilever design for the overhang. Then sew some out door fabric for the shade part. Design it so you can take it down/replace as needed.

Provides shade, last forever, change colors as fashion changes, keeps leaves out.

Good luck.

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Woodknack

13442 posts in 3189 days


#6 posted 06-29-2020 04:29 AM

I thought of building something like pic2 but we have hurricanes and there is no way to build it strong enough to survive that on a homeowner budget, at least not my budget. For the roof you might consider retractable canopies that can be pulled back in winter or during wind storms.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Craftsman on the lake

3397 posts in 4246 days


#7 posted 06-29-2020 11:47 AM

Again. Bluntly
With a possible snow load

Picture one with a roof NO…
Picrture two with a roof, YES but Posts go underneath or notched. Bolting on the sides to hold weight is not good and in Maine at least, not legal for roofs or decks.

Snow weighs up to 20 lbs per cubic foot. If the roof were 10×10’ and the snow 2 ft thick which shouldn’t be that unusual anyplace in NY especially north and west NY, then that’s 4000 lbs. So, you need to build the roof to take at least but possibly in excess of 2 tons. (3 ft of show? = 6000 lbs)
Also, I have steel roofs here in Maine on my house, garage, etc. On a 5/12 pitch roof the snow slides off, after awhile, but on anything much less than that it stays, especially after the roof gets dirty. I braced the hell out of my hip roofs here on the house for just that reason. And, even on that 4ft of snow one winter, which is unusual, I took two feet off.

The cross bracing on the first picture is strong. The cross bracing on the second picture isn’t made to hold a load.

So it would be the first picture with front legs as in the second picture. If you didn’t want a roof, or had a removable one then the first picture would be fine as is.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Biddles

24 posts in 1224 days


#8 posted 06-29-2020 08:44 PM

I guess I need to go back to the drawing board. I can’t have 6×6 posts going through the deck to support the front of the roof without it looking completely out of place. When I step out of the sliding glass door from the kitchen onto the deck the hot tub is two feet to the right, so I can’t have a support post sitting right there. It’s just out of place.

I know I can build a privacy fence onto the edge of the deck, that shouldn’t be a problem, but then I really need to figure out a roofing solution to get shade, and cover the hot tub from the sap, and elements.

View HerringImpaired's profile

HerringImpaired

72 posts in 518 days


#9 posted 06-29-2020 09:39 PM

Something like this would cover all but the area for grilling. Just throwing it out there for your viewing pleasure… ☺
I like how the privacy screens roll up and down with the cover as it opens up…. I built a Gazebo of Cedar and Suntuf, but I may have gone this route if I knew it existed….

http://www.covana.com/hot-tub-cover-oasis

-- "My greatest fear is that upon my demise, my wife will sell my tools for what I said I paid for them."

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Craftsman on the lake

3397 posts in 4246 days


#10 posted 06-29-2020 10:55 PM

Other possible options depending on the amount of room you’ve got.

Put more corner posts but put them back a bit, maybe 25% back from the front.

Put a beam across the front and put one center post or two posts separated but towards the center front.

Another good reason for not having just two rear posts and lots of snow. The snow on the front end of the roof will place a ton of pressure on the front. The rear posts, unless they were anchored deep in the ground with cement would break at the base. Especially if you just bolted them to the deck at the base. I think it would pull your deck up off the ground at that point with a lot of snow if the roof didn’t break first.

I have seen draped cloth on these things as a sun shield. Removed in the winter. Wouldn’t need big supports on the top either.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Biddles

24 posts in 1224 days


#11 posted 07-01-2020 10:02 AM

Maybe I can do it without the roof, and run some eye hooks to put on a fabric top, but the sap from the pine tree would likely ruin it. Gotta rethink this, because I really want to prevent the hot tub from the daily elements, and protect it from the sap. Maybe in the winter I can just use three support posts on the deck to support it, but for the rest of the year it should hold fine right? It’s just the snow load we’re worried about here?

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CWWoodworking

887 posts in 988 days


#12 posted 07-01-2020 10:15 AM

Post a pic of your space

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Craftsman on the lake

3397 posts in 4246 days


#13 posted 07-01-2020 11:59 AM

You have a cantilever and Y braces to hold the roof from breaking off or sagging. The braces seem necessary at that point right? But, what braces the bottom of the posts? The pressure is the same down there. If the posts are in the ground and cemented in maybe. But if you have maybe a 2×10 with a couple of bolts at the base of the posts holding an entire overhanging structure of wood with no corn braces at that point, then would that be the same as if you had just bolted the roof the posts without even any braces?

Not trying to be difficult here. I’ve built a lot of decks and even some with sunroofs on them and if I did this I’d just be keeping my fingers crossed and have to tell the people (mostly relatives so it’s okay) keep your fingers crossed because I’m just not sure what will happen here. I’d be saying, “during the winter don’t let the kids play under this thing.”

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Biddles

24 posts in 1224 days


#14 posted 07-02-2020 12:21 AM

I was planning on using 3’ ft cement piers with these post bases to hold the 6×6 posts. Like this.

I’ll try and get a pic tomorrow, although I don’t see it helping much as the deck isn’t in, but you can get a better idea I suppose.

I could put the posts into the concrete themselves, just not sure how deep they would need to sit, and how much concrete I would need around them to be deemed safe. Also how would I prevent it from being pulled upward? Just put a large 8-10” bolt through the base before concrete?

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Craftsman on the lake

3397 posts in 4246 days


#15 posted 07-02-2020 12:33 AM

Embedding it deeply in concrete maybe. The metal hold fasts you show won’t rally cut it. They’re made to keep a post in place latterally, not rally connect them much to the concrete. The connection to the wood wood by screws is the weak point.
If you were to put an 8 foot 4×4 connected to one of these you could grab the top and pull it off by hand.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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