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Q. on Spraying Lacquer

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Forum topic by unclearthur posted 06-28-2020 06:57 PM 365 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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unclearthur

359 posts in 2592 days


06-28-2020 06:57 PM

Just a quick question: I’m spraying clear nitrocellulose lacquer through an HVLP.

When I open the gallon can of lacquer, there’s quite a thick white film at the bottom. I tried stirring it in, but it doesn’t seem to dissolve very easily. I wonder if I am better off just leaving it alone and just stirring the liquid.

(I do filter the laqcuer before I pour it into the sprayer).

Does anyone know what the white stuff is? Mix it or leave it alone?

Thanks for all replies.


9 replies so far

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1249 posts in 531 days


#1 posted 06-28-2020 07:09 PM

That’s the flattening agent. Depending on the sheen your using.
Yes, keep it stirred up good, or you will get different sheens as you spray and it settles.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2508 posts in 967 days


#2 posted 06-28-2020 08:25 PM

what does the “sheen” on the can say ?
gloss, semi-gloss, satin, matte, etc.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View farmfromkansas's profile

farmfromkansas

210 posts in 418 days


#3 posted 06-28-2020 10:04 PM

If you don’t stir it up, it will be gloss. Flattening agents are additives.

View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

359 posts in 2592 days


#4 posted 06-28-2020 10:43 PM



what does the “sheen” on the can say ?
gloss, semi-gloss, satin, matte, etc.
- John Smith

Satin.

Thanks for the answers, I’ll stir it.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

871 posts in 983 days


#5 posted 06-28-2020 10:47 PM

Stirred. Not shaken. Wait, maybe it’s the other way around…

View hkmiller's profile

hkmiller

235 posts in 886 days


#6 posted 06-29-2020 11:55 AM

Keep stirring. It will dissolve.

-- always something

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2508 posts in 967 days


#7 posted 06-29-2020 12:38 PM

all the above information is good.

the sediment in the bottom of the can is the correct amount of an added
solid material that gives the finish that is listed on the can. (satin, in this case).

ALL of the sediment must be fully stirred until all of the sediment is brought up
evenly into solution – and stirred frequently during the application process.
(it says so right in the instructions on the can).
if you don’t do it, you may experience “less than” satisfactory results in your finish.
let us know how it turns out for you.

Edit: you have a couple dozen very nice projects posted. what have you used for
finishing before this particular “sediment” issue ??

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

359 posts in 2592 days


#8 posted 07-01-2020 07:02 AM


Edit: you have a couple dozen very nice projects posted. what have you used for
finishing before this particular “sediment” issue ??
- John Smith

Thanks, almost always brushed poly in the past, or just used Danish oil. Just starting out spraying. Results have been mixed but it sure is a lot faster.

And you guys were right, it all dissolved with stirring. I was just being impatient.

Thanks all

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2508 posts in 967 days


#9 posted 07-01-2020 11:09 AM

I have had paint and finishes that have sat for so long that there was a half inch
or more of the “sediment” in the bottom of the can that had to be broken up with
screwdrivers and other heavy duty tools before I could even start to use a mechanical
mixer in a drill motor.
“Back in the Day” when we used lead based paints, stirring the bottom of the can
was “required” before doing anything. (lead is heavy and sinks fast).
but the regiment is still the same today – no matter what finish you use.
stir stir stir then filter then use.
looking forward to seeing your completed projects.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

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