LumberJocks

Which 90 degree drill?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Zonker posted 06-28-2020 03:12 PM 407 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Zonker's profile

Zonker

133 posts in 655 days


06-28-2020 03:12 PM

I am in the market for a 90 degree cordless drill. It will be either a Dewalt 20v or Milwaukee 12v since that is what I’m running in the shop. I am leaning towards the 12v simply because I don’t use it that often, it is physically smaller for tight areas, and lighter weight. The size is not an issue for the current project, but I can see where it may come into play on furniture builds and other projects. As far as quality of either tool, I feel they are pretty equal, and I like the feel of what I have in other tools. Will be visiting the box stores soon to evaluate each tools ergonomics which may end up being the final decider. All that said, I’d like to hear peoples opinions and maybe get an idea or two on things I haven’t thought through. Thanks.

-- Larry A. - I've made a small fortune with my woodworking. The trouble is, I started with a large fortune.


14 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2507 posts in 966 days


#1 posted 06-28-2020 03:29 PM

cordless and no batteries to worry about.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

26141 posts in 3487 days


#2 posted 06-28-2020 04:34 PM

What my son uses…

Called a Hammerhead Drill…..has both Drill/Impact and just impact settings….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1756 posts in 3597 days


#3 posted 06-28-2020 06:36 PM

No experience with the right angle, but after using Milwaukee on electrical construction jobs for years, I would stay the course. Few contractors had DeWalt battery tools.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6637 posts in 2524 days


#4 posted 06-28-2020 08:04 PM

What do you plan on doing with it? The DeWalt will certainly be more powerful but I’m pretty sure the Milwaukee is a little more compact. I have neither, mine is a corded Milwaukee and it’s never let me down.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1249 posts in 530 days


#5 posted 06-28-2020 08:12 PM

If you didn’t want to spend the money on a drill.
(and in case you didn’t know), they make all kinds of right angle drill attachments

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View HerringImpaired's profile

HerringImpaired

71 posts in 513 days


#6 posted 06-28-2020 09:04 PM

This is what I did as well. I needed the capability, but couldn’t justify the expense for drilling and tapping four holes in my boat. I’ve used it a few times since, but not nearly enough to justify the expense of a dedicated right angle drill.


If you didn t want to spend the money on a drill. (and in case you didn t know), they make all kinds of “right angle drill attachments”
- LeeRoyMan

-- "My greatest fear is that upon my demise, my wife will sell my tools for what I said I paid for them."

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

3340 posts in 2298 days


#7 posted 06-28-2020 09:27 PM

+1 Use a 90° adapter.

This handy Dewalt adapter will tolerate the abuse from impact driver. The only defect I have with adapters is on non-impact rated versions: the locking mechanism that prevents the bits from coming out will wear out after much abuse with impact tool. Have lost several spade bits inside walls, till I upgraded to an impact capable version. The non-impact version is $15. It is almost silly not to have one in tool box. The impact version is more expensive, but cheaper than a new tool.

I also have used home user grade Dewalt and Milwaukee 90° drivers. They lack power to drive a 3/4” spade bit into 2×4. Small holes work fine, but they don’t have enough umph for large holes without stalling. Have spend $400 on M18 Super Hawg or 60v flexvolt for big drill bits.
Using a 90° adapter, can punch a 1.25” spade bit through double 2×6 header with ease. :-)

Just remember when using any right angle adapter:
Don’t be a Klutz! Never let go, or change your grip; until the bit/tip has stopped moving. DAMHIK

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

247 posts in 2036 days


#8 posted 06-28-2020 09:31 PM

I’m with LeeRoyMan, I have a Milwaukee compact corded and it is great but 90 percent of the time I use one of these, very well made and stores nicely in my drill case so I always have it at hand. I’ve had other versions from other manufacturers and this one beats them by a mile.
https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Products/Accessories/Driving-and-Fastening/Driver-Bits---General/49-22-8510

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

View Zonker's profile

Zonker

133 posts in 655 days


#9 posted 06-28-2020 10:17 PM

John Smith, I’ll pick one up as soon as I can hire a six handed assistant. LOL, that is about the coolest drill I’ve seen. Everyone Else: Thanks for the input. I will be running Cat 5 cable in my home, the existing holes in the stud bays aren’t big enough for 12/3 wire, Cable, AND Cat 5 so I have to drill new holes right next existing ones. The holes on the exterior walls are where the 90 Degree drill comes in. I have an adapter, (Milescraft) which I actually use a fair amount in the shop and house. But I’ll be reaching into a tight area, while trying not to fall through a ceiling, while controlling a 90 degree drill. The 90 degree attachment I have is almost a three handed tool to keep everything together, and in the confines of a hot cramped attic, I prefer to eliminate as many hassles as possible. I will most likely go with the Milwaukee. Thanks again everyone.

-- Larry A. - I've made a small fortune with my woodworking. The trouble is, I started with a large fortune.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1756 posts in 3597 days


#10 posted 06-29-2020 12:28 AM

No experience with the right angle, but after using Milwaukee on electrical construction jobs for years, I would stay with the Milwaukee. Few contractors had DeWalt battery tools.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5929 posts in 1378 days


#11 posted 06-29-2020 12:45 AM

Depends, what you need to drill through. Just small stuff, with small bits, and either a dedicated right angle drill, of the small tool variety, or the add on that OnhillWW posted. They will both do a small hole, through XYZ without a lot of drama. Best thing is they can fit into a space the drill won’t.

Now if you plan to pop a lot of holes into 2x structure, get a Hole Hawg, or rent one and be done with it.

Reading your update, go rent a hoke hawg, and get it all done in an afternoon.

-- Think safe, be safe

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1249 posts in 530 days


#12 posted 06-29-2020 12:47 AM

Your drilling thru studs in the attic….who knew?

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

871 posts in 982 days


#13 posted 06-29-2020 12:55 AM

Which battery system do you foresee using longer? That would be a factor for me. They all will need replacing at some point.

View Walker's profile

Walker

385 posts in 1276 days


#14 posted 06-29-2020 01:57 AM

I was gifted a Milwaukee M18 right angle drill a few years ago. Bare-tool only, so I had to buy a battery and a charger. I’m not that into cordless tools, so it is still the only one I own. However, I like it a lot. It’s one of those things you don’t know you need until you have one, then you can’t live without.

-- ~Walker

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com