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Wooden Sash Planes

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Forum topic by sjepps posted 06-25-2020 02:02 PM 321 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sjepps

3 posts in 11 days


06-25-2020 02:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane

First time poster, long time lurker!

I do wood working as a hobby, and after fixing all of the windows in my house, I repair single pane wood windows as a side hustle. I’m trying to find a wood sash, plane stick and rebate, and coping plane that matches the sash iron in the no. 45’s and 55’s. I have a no. 55 and use it, along with sash router bits but I’d like a wooden plane as the no. 55 is clunky for cutting the mullions. I would like to save time and not have to switch out router bits. Plus I’d rather do things by hand.

I’m just not sure where to start or what to look for in a wooden plane. The Stanley irons were pretty standard but it seems like the wooden planes are regional, specific to types of window and sometimes dependent on whether they were used in a house or ship! That’s not even taking into account the wooden English planes, which is a whole different animal. The ovolos are just all over the place. The rebate is pretty standard though :P

I know this is kind of a niche but any help or direction would be very helpful!


5 replies so far

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CaptainKlutz

3167 posts in 2265 days


#1 posted 06-30-2020 09:44 AM

Welcome to Lumberjocks!

You can make you own wood profile planes, but it involves some metal work? Here is one example:
http://hackneytools.com/2015/02/making-your-own-moulding-planes/

There are several folks still making wooden planes, and couple will do custom work.
Popular Woodworking had piece with a list of modern day wooden plane makers:
https://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/another-great-maker-of-wooden-handplanes/

Direct links in random order:

http://www.phillyplanes.co.uk/index.html
https://msbickford.com/
http://www.planemaker.com/index.html
http://www.jwildingplanemaker.com/
https://calebjamesmaker.com/

Have no direct knowledge on these folks listed above.
I am a novice hand tool user, and only sharing what I learned when I went looking to buy modern day wood planes.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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sjepps

3 posts in 11 days


#2 posted 06-30-2020 12:26 PM

Thanks!, that’s helpful. Brickford has sash planes funny enough. It looks like they’re based on the Stanley no 1 and no 2 sash profiles. I’ll message them and see if they have any other information on profiles.

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SMP

2106 posts in 676 days


#3 posted 06-30-2020 01:14 PM

Weren’t they usually cut with a moving fillister/sash plane then whatever molding plane? Unless they were the multi-iron dedicated profile. You could search for some on Jim Bode’s site.

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sjepps

3 posts in 11 days


#4 posted 06-30-2020 01:50 PM



Weren’t they usually cut with a moving fillister/sash plane then whatever molding plane? Unless they were the multi-iron dedicated profile. You could search for some on Jim Bode’s site.

- SMP

Yes. Generally there is a profile cutter, rebate, and then a coping plane with the same profile. The rebate and profile cutter (ogee usually) were combined in later versions (Apparently an American idea?). This brought it down to just two planes (Stanley no 1 and no 2 sash cutters). I’ve seen up to four irons in an English sash plane for a gothic profile. It was pretty cool, and also priced as such :P

There just doesn’t seem to be any rhyme or reason to the profiles. Seems like it was just up to the maker. The coping planes are hard to find :(

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bandit571

25883 posts in 3454 days


#5 posted 06-30-2020 03:15 PM

Not sure about the wooden part, but

I have used the No. 1 cutter a few times in the Stanley #45….takes a bit of room..

Not for a window, though….used it for a frame to house a panel.

1/4” panel is then glued in place.

Seemed to work…

For the top of the 5 drawer chest of drawers I have in my shop….to store a lot of my tools..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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