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Routering a one inch wide, one inch deep slot the length of 4x6x8 treaded posts

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Forum topic by frascati posted 06-21-2020 02:08 AM 1852 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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frascati

5 posts in 50 days


06-21-2020 02:08 AM

Hello,
Building a fence. Would like to slot the 1×6x8 deck boards horizontally into vertical 4×6 posts.

Simply put, looking to router a 1×1 inch slot the length of each post on two sides.

I’ll never do this again. Probably 5 8ft long slots total.

Home depot does not have a 1” carbide router bit. I can run a 3/4 bit twice, but it involves resetting guides on already not perfect posts and will be tricky as hell to get the width consistent. And a 1” carbide bit is going to be 50 dollars or more and I’ll never use it again.

What I’d like to do, and I’m fully prepared to be flamed for safety here but I’m 100 percent confident in my ability to do this and stay 100 percent safe, is to cut short a two dollar 1 inch paddle bit and collet it into the router. I have a good sized Milwaukee router so power is not a concern. Grind off the lead point/screw on the bit. I could hone the bit between 8ft runs. It would probably last just fine for five of those cuts. Plenty of time to go slow.

Has anyone resorted to this and what was the outcome?

Thanks so much.


35 replies so far

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1299 posts in 2367 days


#1 posted 06-21-2020 02:21 AM

I wouldn’t even try it. Sounds like an accident waiting to happen. I’d use a proper router bit and make several passes.

View Splinterlicker's profile

Splinterlicker

14 posts in 51 days


#2 posted 06-21-2020 02:43 AM

You’ll use that bit again. All slotting bits get used again eventually. Once you have it, you’ll find uses for it.

Paddle bits aren’t meant to cut with their side, all you’ll do by putting one in a router is fling one or more pieces of either it or yourself across whichever ocean you happen to live next to.

Posts don’t need to be perfect to get a good cut, just reference off of the same side each time, that’ll keep your width consistent, and you only need to reset your guide once.

Oh and uhh… Just gonna remind you here… It’s a fence….

I built literally hundreds of miles of fencing of all types as government contracts once upon a time. I promise you, the only person who is going to notice if your slot is 1/8th inch off center is you, and you’re going to stop noticing roughly a week after the project is finished and you stop mooshing your face up against the rails to check their moisture content.

They’re all going to be shaped like hockey sticks in a year anyways if my experience with Home Depot’s deck boards is anything to go by. You better have a ruthless method of locking the ends down to make sure they don’t get pulled out.

View Tony_S's profile (online now)

Tony_S

1335 posts in 3889 days


#3 posted 06-21-2020 10:01 AM



Has anyone resorted to this and what was the outcome?
- frascati

In my 35 years as a professional woodworker, I’ve both seen and heard of some crazy shit…but this ones right up there.

Predicted outcome…
At worst, a trip to the hospital with a broken spade bit embedded in your guts.
At best, you shit your pants after the spade bit bends, then breaks as the router base detonates, all in a micro second.

Make no mistake…bad things will happen.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View clagwell's profile

clagwell

275 posts in 598 days


#4 posted 06-21-2020 10:23 AM

A lot less than $50



Amazon

Or search “Freud 12-172” for more choices

I might use a circular saw and chisel rather than a router.

-- Dave, Tippecanoe County, IN --- Is there a corollary to Beranek.s Law that applies to dust collection?

View JIMMIEM's profile

JIMMIEM

71 posts in 1647 days


#5 posted 06-21-2020 11:18 AM

How about a mortising guide with a guide bushing that would let you make your slot to desired width. You indicate the posts are not perfect so you would need a guide system…couple of parallel boards clamped to your post with an appropriate sized gap that would accommodate the guide bushing to clean out a 1 inch wide groove. With a guide bushing you wouldn’t need a 1 inch wide router bit.

View OLCHIEF's profile

OLCHIEF

39 posts in 187 days


#6 posted 06-21-2020 11:37 AM

I presume your posts are pressure treated. Also if those deck boards are Home Depot bull nosed decking, are they not 5/4? I have a lot of experience with milling pt wood projects out here on the ranch, I will share my thoughts. I doubt the modified paddle bit will hold up to router speeds. I have a 3.5 hp plunge router and it would have a tough time running a 1” bit 1” deep through a PT post. I would not use a router unless you intend to make multiple shallow passes to get to the depth, and then I would use a 1/2 inch bit and move it over to get the full width.. PT wood is high moisture content southern yellow pine and will be inclined to bind your router bit if you try to take too big a bite. It is also going to shrink over time as it dries. In your situation I would instead make multiple passes with a circular saw set to the depth you want then break out/chisel out the waste. If you can run a circular saw in a straight line no need for fences, edge guides, or makeshift router bits.

-- OL CHIEF, Florida Panhandle

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5660 posts in 1388 days


#7 posted 06-21-2020 11:37 AM

I’d use either a circular saw and guide, or a dado stack in a table saw.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View marc_rosen's profile

marc_rosen

175 posts in 3987 days


#8 posted 06-21-2020 01:15 PM

Hey Frascati,
It might benefit you to use a combination of tools. Score the edges of the slot with a circular saw. So what if you need to readjust the guide. Another way to “adjust” the guide is to screw a narrow piece of wood against the guide for scoring the opposite edge of the groove. And if you score the waste in the middle it will make your routing experience less arduous.
After scoring your posts go ahead with a half inch (1/2) router bit, not three quarters (3/4), making the guide adjustments with the screwed on narrow piece. Again, your effort will minimized with the smaller bit and your scoring steps will have decreased the width of the waste.
And like Splinterlicker typed, “it’s a fence”, not a piece of furniture.
.. ... Marc

-- Windsurfing, Woodworking, Weaving, and Woodducks. "Most woodworkers are usually boring holes"

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1768 posts in 3599 days


#9 posted 06-21-2020 01:24 PM

I would not slot the posts. As stated above, the horizontal boards will change shape as they dry. I would nail a stop board on one side and screw a removable stop board on the other to make changing hockey sticks possible. Your insurance deductible is more money than the router bit.

View tmasondarnell's profile

tmasondarnell

134 posts in 2595 days


#10 posted 06-21-2020 01:29 PM

As an alternative, instead of cutting the slot into the post, could you build it out by ripping some of the fencing boards or other stock) to 1 or 1 1/14 and attaching them to the sides of the posts leaving a 1” slot in the middle? TOu could using the fence boards as a spacer so you would get a tight fit.

Actually, I think this would be much easier then trying to route the slot in a PT post that is going to be a twisted mess.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1258 posts in 1765 days


#11 posted 06-21-2020 01:35 PM

Pattern and a pattern bit. I have to do something similiar to my deck to insert rope lighting.

View Walker's profile

Walker

385 posts in 1278 days


#12 posted 06-21-2020 05:24 PM

Am I missing something here, or would this accomplished with a few passes on the table saw with a dado blade?

-- ~Walker

View OHYESYOUWOOD's profile

OHYESYOUWOOD

4 posts in 49 days


#13 posted 06-21-2020 05:39 PM

I am with EVERYONE that said dado blade and table saw.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

1258 posts in 1765 days


#14 posted 06-21-2020 06:14 PM



Am I missing something here, or would this accomplished with a few passes on the table saw with a dado blade?

- Walker

You are….he said with a router..

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

873 posts in 985 days


#15 posted 06-21-2020 06:26 PM


Has anyone resorted to this and what was the outcome?
- frascati

In my 35 years as a professional woodworker, I ve both seen and heard of some crazy shit…but this ones right up there.

Predicted outcome…
At worst, a trip to the hospital with a broken spade bit embedded in your guts.
At best, you shit your pants after the spade bit bends, then breaks as the router base detonates, all in a micro second.

Make no mistake…bad things will happen.

- Tony_S

All for 50$.

I can barely buy a meal or 2 for the family for 50$.

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