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End grain / planer

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Forum topic by Sawdust2012 posted 06-20-2020 11:46 PM 570 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sawdust2012

230 posts in 2521 days


06-20-2020 11:46 PM

I’m probably going to set off a debate almost as big as if I had said what I was thinking about the dog that chewed up the door in another forum topic.

I have seen videos of people gluing sacrificial pieces to end grain cutting boards to run them through a planer. I’ve heard it works with a true helical cutter head. I have also heard the horror stories. There is wisdom in the counsel of many. What do y’all think? Does it work? Is it a crazy risk?


11 replies so far

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

299 posts in 1584 days


#1 posted 06-21-2020 12:27 AM

Ive done it with a Helical Head, glued strips on the ends and took small cuts.
So far its worked fine.
Just make sure the strips are as wide as your board.
Also did it by just bevelling the end so it didnt chip, but with less luck.

View Jimothy's profile

Jimothy

56 posts in 1749 days


#2 posted 07-10-2020 03:33 AM

I’ve done it also with sacrificial rails aswell. In my experience, it’s worked most of the time, but I’ve also had my project blown apart if there was a particularly high spot. I just use a belt sander now personally. A drum sander would be even better

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5963 posts in 1383 days


#3 posted 07-10-2020 05:06 AM

Very sharp cutters/knives coupled with very light passes. On any given pass the wood gonna do, what the wood does, but most folks with a broken up mess are trying to take too much. MTM wood does it pretty frequently on his videos. I used to do it pretty frequently, but I’ve now got a wide belt sander, it’s a much better tool for this.

-- Think safe, be safe

View sras's profile

sras

5536 posts in 3938 days


#4 posted 07-10-2020 02:21 PM

I used to use the planer. When I did I used sacrifical sides and took VERY light passes – 0.002” to 0.005” at a time.

I have since switched to a router sled set up to get the sides even & parallel. Then several passes through the thickness sander to clean up router marks.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2518 posts in 971 days


#5 posted 07-10-2020 05:13 PM

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3050 posts in 3753 days


#6 posted 07-12-2020 07:34 PM

Nuff said, but I’ll say it anyway – you may get away with it fifty times, but, when you don’t, it could be catastrophic.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3784 posts in 3157 days


#7 posted 07-13-2020 12:43 PM

When the end grain explodes, it isn’t just a destroyed project, but the damage the big chunks will do to the planer (speaking from experience). I had one of my inlays blow up in my DW735. I had to replace the blades and rebuild a fair amount of the drive system. Several of the gears were also damaged. Total cost was around $150 or so and a couple weeks without a planer while waiting for replacement parts. It was one of those things that was so loud and did enough damage that I won’t do it again.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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Robert

3800 posts in 2289 days


#8 posted 07-13-2020 01:06 PM

I have no experience doing this, but it seems to me it would not be a job for a machine with knives. Also, the thickness would be a factor.

Personally, I would use a router sled. They are not that hard to set up.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

230 posts in 2521 days


#9 posted 07-14-2020 11:27 AM



Nuff said, but I ll say it anyway – you may get away with it fifty times, but, when you don t, it could be catastrophic.

- Kelly

Thanks Kelly! I think that is the salient point here. It’s sort of like skydiving. If it goes bad, it goes really really bad.

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

230 posts in 2521 days


#10 posted 07-14-2020 11:29 AM



When the end grain explodes, it isn t just a destroyed project, but the damage the big chunks will do to the planer (speaking from experience). I had one of my inlays blow up in my DW735. I had to replace the blades and rebuild a fair amount of the drive system. Several of the gears were also damaged. Total cost was around $150 or so and a couple weeks without a planer while waiting for replacement parts. It was one of those things that was so loud and did enough damage that I won t do it again.

- EarlS

Thanks Earl. I think the risk may be too high on this one.

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Sawdust2012

230 posts in 2521 days


#11 posted 07-14-2020 11:29 AM



I have no experience doing this, but it seems to me it would not be a job for a machine with knives. Also, the thickness would be a factor.

Personally, I would use a router sled. They are not that hard to set up.

- Robert

That seems to be a smart choice

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