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Drill press runout

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Forum topic by Tedstor posted 06-04-2020 08:40 PM 465 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tedstor

1690 posts in 3403 days


06-04-2020 08:40 PM

So I bought a used Grizzly 7944 many moons ago. Its always had a ‘little bit’ of run out, but never enough to worry about too much. However, it has become worse. I’m not a skilled machinist, but according to my dial indicator, the runout is nearly .006. Using any large or long bits is intolerable.

I replaced the chuck and arbor, with no improvement.

What’s the next step here?

Spindle and bearings? Is that a difficult job?

I only paid like $125 for the machine, and have had it for 10 years. So I’m reluctant to go down any financial rabbit holes to fix it. The grizzly website has the spindle listed $35, and bearings for $10 each. According to the parts breakdown, there are four bearings. So I’m looking at $75 just to give this a shot. I’d rather just cut my losses if a spindle replacement is unlikely to solve the issue, or its a difficult repair (or will require the purchase of any special tools).

Any thoughts?
TIA


13 replies so far

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AndyJ1s

324 posts in 525 days


#1 posted 06-04-2020 09:16 PM

Another way to look at it is the replacement cost, instead of the original cost. That DP is currently $475+shipping ($99), or $575.

At that price, maybe $75 is not so much. Unless you’d really rather have a different drill press. Like one of those Nova DVR drill presses…?

You might pull the bearings and find a match at a local or online bearing vendor for cheaper.

Your penny, your pound of flesh…

-- Andy - Arlington TX

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MrUnix

8085 posts in 2969 days


#2 posted 06-04-2020 09:37 PM

The grizzly website has the spindle listed $35, and bearings for $10 each. According to the parts breakdown, there are four bearings. So I’m looking at $75 just to give this a shot.

Yank the spindle and test on a piece of glass. Most likely, it’s fine and you just need bearings. It takes a LOT to mess up a hardened spindle.

As for bearings, DO NOT buy them from Grizzly! Not only will you be paying way more for them than necessary, but they will most likely be some cheap no-name chinese things – you really have no way of knowing just exactly what you will get – and Grizzly is notorious for using POS bearings. Instead, order the bearings from a reputable bearing supplier, like Accurate Bearing. Not only will you get much better bearings, but they will cost significantly less than what Grizzly would charge you, or even what most on-line bearing places (like VXB) charge.

Tip: Pull the bearings and verify what you have in there – I’ve seen on more than one occasion where the machine had different bearings than what the parts diagram called for. Could have been a last minute change at the factory, an in-field modification, or an out of control previous owner – who knows.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Tedstor

1690 posts in 3403 days


#3 posted 06-04-2020 10:03 PM



Another way to look at it is the replacement cost, instead of the original cost. That DP is currently $475+shipping ($99), or $575.

At that price, maybe $75 is not so much. Unless you d really rather have a different drill press. Like one of those Nova DVR drill presses…?

You might pull the bearings and find a match at a local or online bearing vendor for cheaper.

Your penny, your pound of flesh…

Oh, I’m totally fine with putting ‘some’ money into the machine IF there is a high likelihood that it’ll fix the issue. But I’d rather just get something else if it won’t or if the repair is beyond my capability.

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Tedstor

1690 posts in 3403 days


#4 posted 06-04-2020 10:09 PM


The grizzly website has the spindle listed $35, and bearings for $10 each. According to the parts breakdown, there are four bearings. So I’m looking at $75 just to give this a shot.

Yank the spindle….

Tip: Pull the bearings and verify what you have in there – I ve seen on more than one occasion where the machine had different bearings than what the parts diagram called for. Could have been a last minute change at the factory, an in-field modification, or an out of control previous owner – who knows.

Is this difficult to do? If it simply involves removing a C-clip and popping the bearings out, I can do that. If its going to require a bearing puller or the purchase of any tools, I’m less inclined.
I can probably sell the machine for what I paid for it, even with disclaiming the run out. Then buy something else for an extra $100-200 (I can haunt craigslist like a pro :) )
Weighing my options vs the headaches/expense.

To add-Nevermind. I just watched a video. Doesn’t look too bad. I might give it a whirl.

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tvrgeek

988 posts in 2419 days


#5 posted 06-04-2020 10:49 PM

Palmgren is the only drill press that lists specs for runout. I bought a used Delta but in hindsight should g=have bought a good one.

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LittleBlackDuck

4673 posts in 1591 days


#6 posted 06-05-2020 12:08 AM



Oh, I m totally fine with putting some money into the machine IF there is a high likelihood that it ll fix the issue. But I d rather just get something else if it won t or if the repair is beyond my capability.
- Tedstor

Depends on your commitment to woodworking (and general DIY/home improvement) and the depth of your wallet…

I lashed out for a NOVA Voyager… yep many shekels compared to your $125 up front… but it is now considered one of my best/favourite/most-used machines in the workshop (close 2nd. to my tablesaw and router and bandsaw and lathe and drumsander…).

Like a car… you can circumnavigate the entire USA on a pushbike… depends on your expectations.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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Tedstor

1690 posts in 3403 days


#7 posted 06-06-2020 03:35 AM


Oh, I m totally fine with putting some money into the machine IF there is a high likelihood that it ll fix the issue. But I d rather just get something else if it won t or if the repair is beyond my capability.
- Tedstor

Depends on your commitment to woodworking (and general DIY/home improvement) and the depth of your wallet…

I lashed out for a NOVA Voyager… yep many shekels compared to your $125 up front… but it is now considered one of my best/favourite/most-used machines in the workshop (close 2nd. to my tablesaw and router and bandsaw and lathe and drumsander…).

Like a car… you can circumnavigate the entire USA on a pushbike… depends on your expectations.

Yeah. As much as I’d love to have a shop full of brand new Festool and Powermatic. I have four kids to feed…....so I’m trying to get by on used Grizzly and Craftsman. Times are tough all over.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6234 posts in 3263 days


#8 posted 06-06-2020 10:41 AM

.006 seems to me like it’s acceptable, at least for woodworking. Hoever, since I’m out of touch with such specs, what should it be? My Delta has .003….not good?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Tedstor

1690 posts in 3403 days


#9 posted 06-06-2020 02:17 PM



.006 seems to me like it s acceptable, at least for woodworking. Hoever, since I m out of touch with such specs, what should it be? My Delta has .003….not good?

- Fred Hargis

Yeah, I’m not 100% sure about the exact measurement. Mine is .006 as best as I could measure. But what prompted me to check in the first place was that I was trying to countersink a router plate with a 3/8 bit. I could visually see the bit wobbling, and the workpiece shook quite a bit once the bit made contact. So my issue only seems to be problematic when I use bits that are long or wide, where runout would be amplified. I mean, shorter bits were an issue too, but not bad enough to lose sleep over.

Anyway, weird thing happened.
I tried to fix this issue initially by removing the old chuck, thoroughly cleaning all the mating surfaces, and reinstalling it. I actually tried this twice, with no luck.

Then I ordered a new chuck. I didn’t order a very expensive one, but it got universally good reviews. Cleaned everything again, and installed it…still wobbled about as much as the old one. I removed it yesterday when I was sizing the machine up for a repair, and reinstalled…...magically, the runout was greatly reduced. Still not perfect…..but acceptable.
I can only guess that my spindle has a ‘sweet spot’ where the chuck fits best. Or, maybe I simply installed the new chuck poorly the first time, and did a better job the second time.

I didn’t bother to measure the run out again. If the machine is working properly (enough), I’m probably better off not knowing :)

.003 doesn’t sound too bad to me. It’s twice as good as where I started from, and even in my case, only bigger bits were a major cause for concern. But clearly, I’m no expert.

View JayKepley's profile

JayKepley

4 posts in 951 days


#10 posted 06-11-2020 08:30 PM

I recently went through my Jet 17” drill press. I replaced the chuck like you did. I also replaced some of the bearings. In doing the research, I ran across a YouTube video where a guy drilled and tapped the front of the press (under the on/off switch) to add three brass screws. You tighten down those screws until you remove any play in the arbor. I bought three brass screws (with tiny steel balls at the end), but I haven’t installed them yet. The other work I did resulted in very little run out and almost no vibration in the center of the table. Good luck.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2535 posts in 3408 days


#11 posted 06-11-2020 10:34 PM



I recently went through my Jet 17” drill press. I replaced the chuck like you did. I also replaced some of the bearings. In doing the research, I ran across a YouTube video where a guy drilled and tapped the front of the press (under the on/off switch) to add three brass screws. You tighten down those screws until you remove any play in the arbor. I bought three brass screws (with tiny steel balls at the end), but I haven t installed them yet. The other work I did resulted in very little run out and almost no vibration in the center of the table. Good luck.

- JayKepley

A fellow LJ did the same using nylon bolts. I think, though, that this fix is not for runout, but for slop in the spindle, which is a different problem.

-Paul

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Ocelot

2535 posts in 3408 days


#12 posted 06-11-2020 10:41 PM

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splintergroup

3777 posts in 1993 days


#13 posted 06-12-2020 07:49 PM

Several things to try before tearing it down.

I assume you placed a dial indicator perpendicular to the spindle/chuck to measure?

First thing is to hold the chuck from rotating and try to force the spindle assembly side-to-side. Check again with the spindle rotated 90 deg.

Any movement here is slop in the spindle guide and/or the bearings.

Check the runout of the chuck by indicating off of a straight shaft secured in the chuck (a large shaft diameter drill bit usually will work). Note the runout, remove and reinstall the shaft/bit in a different orientation. Check the runout again. If the values are the same, the chuck is probably holding the test shaft/bit in-line so no real issues with the chuck internals. If not, the chuck has issues with centering the bit and probably should be changed.

Measure the runout on the body of the chuck and note the value. Make a mark on the chuck body where the maximum is observed and also a mark directly above this point on the spindle where it is fitted into the chuck.
Remove the chuck and measure the spindle runout. If it peaks where you put the mark from testing the chuck and has the same value, the spindle is wonky. If the value peaks at a different position, re-install the chuck in a position where you can have the chuck runout compensate the spindle runout. You might come up with a chuck position that improves your runout to an acceptable value.

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