LumberJocks

skills

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Pasta posted 06-02-2020 08:38 PM 412 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Pasta's profile

Pasta

1 post in 42 days


06-02-2020 08:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

HI ALL, I AM A NEW WOODOWRKER AND WAS WONDERING IF ANYONE COULD REACH OUT AND OFFER SOME GOOD BOOKS ON JOINERY AND PROJECT BOOKS TO LEARN TECHNIQUES BEFORE I ATTEMPT TO BUILD MY OWN FURNITURE?


8 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

674 posts in 1392 days


#1 posted 06-02-2020 09:45 PM

Your best bet is to find an old woodworker to teach you. Look for clubs in your area, friends, relations, neighbors. Focus on learning some basic joints. Scrap or found wood can be a great source of practice pieces. Check out Paul Sellers common woodworking for basics and follow his Master Classes for some great techniques. I’m partial to hand tool woodworking, so my opinions are heavily biased in that direction. You can get a full hand tool kit for what you would pay for a decent stationary tool. Did I mention that I’m a bit frugal too?

Visit here often and you’ll get some great tips and tricks. I’ve been at this for 45 years as a hobby and am still learning.

-- Sawdust Maker

View therealSteveN's profile (online now)

therealSteveN

5760 posts in 1346 days


#2 posted 06-02-2020 09:51 PM

Put in a location, city and state, or just portion of the state I like SW Ohio for me. That way someone in your neck of the woods could know this. Hands on is by far the best school. For books, I would suggest you hit the library hard, and see if your state has a state run digital library.

In Ohio there is The Ohio Digital library, which vastly increases resources over just your local.

https://ohdbks.overdrive.com/

Thing about books is many don’t really teach what they pronounce to, and even if they do, what I like, may be different than what you will like, so buying to start can be expensive, without really helping you much. Use up the freebies, then you may have a better idea of what you like, and the direction you want to go.

-- Think safe, be safe

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5913 posts in 4016 days


#3 posted 06-02-2020 10:55 PM

The best way to learn woodworking is to just go ahead with a project and do the best you can. You will make mistakes, but that’s how you learn. There is only so much you can learn from a book. Study pieces of furniture you have in your house and look at construction of furniture in a store. There you will find different joints used.

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2344 posts in 2801 days


#4 posted 06-03-2020 12:01 AM

I agree with MrRon. When I started down the path of hand tools, I watched lots of YouTube vids and read websites. Came time to run a handplane for jointing an edge and it is something you just have to learn by yourself. How much pressure to apply, feel the valleys and hills, how rough or smooth things are, etc.

Grab some hardwood lumber to practice on. Popular, for example.

Now to learn how to properly setup & sharpen your tools, YouTube is also great for that.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

896 posts in 427 days


#5 posted 06-03-2020 12:48 AM



I agree with MrRon. When I started down the path of hand tools, I watched lots of YouTube vids and read websites. Came time to run a handplane for jointing an edge and it is something you just have to learn by yourself. How much pressure to apply, feel the valleys and hills, how rough or smooth things are, etc.

Grab some hardwood lumber to practice on. Popular, for example.

Now to learn how to properly setup & sharpen your tools, YouTube is also great for that.

- Holbs

I had to laugh a little about your experience running a hand plane. First time i got a no 7 and tried jointing a board I thought it was pretty straight forward. Lay giant plane on wood, run length of wood, ???, jack pot! Boy was i wrong. That is a skill unto itself and while Im now pretty good at it there are times i walk away with a bad edge cuz i didnt pay attention.

View shirleyfamily's profile

shirleyfamily

5 posts in 41 days


#6 posted 06-03-2020 02:24 AM

A firend of mine is a carpenter. He constantly caught up in the aesthetic and technical details, mathematical influences, and real world problem solving strategy that’s used around us all the time. Next time you come across a building or chair that catches your eye, ask yourself: How did they build that? What kind of joinery does it employ? When was is made? What kind of wood was it made out of? These “details” are usually not accidents; many times adept artisans use materials and building strategies for a reason.

View farmfromkansas's profile

farmfromkansas

188 posts in 386 days


#7 posted 06-03-2020 11:58 PM

First thing you need to learn are proper ways to use your tools with safety in mind. Maybe see if there is an evening class for grown ups at your local school in woodworking. My neighbor used to take the classes, and he got to use their equipment to build things. That way you get experience with better machines than the home versions.

View Mike's profile

Mike

116 posts in 1472 days


#8 posted 06-04-2020 04:03 PM

In general, books and videos are great for instruction and understanding. But eventually you have to put the tool to the wood, and that’s where the real learning comes in. That’s when an instructor or solo shop time is invaluable. I guarantee you will learn more in one day on your own than a month of reading.

BUT, with that said, you asked for good books for beginners. When I started, the beginner books that spoke to me and seemed easiest to understand were different than the ones that sold the most copies or were recommended by other woodworkers. I think it’s critical to find books that resonate with you. Go to Amazon and click the “Look Inside!” links for books that sound interesting. You will get a feeling for the writing and the content’s level. In an hour you should find a book or two that speaks to you. Check them out at the library or buy them from a local bookstore (support your local independents!) and start reading. Supplement with videos. Then get thee into the shop!

Welcome to the hobby and let us know how it goes!

-- Reasoning will never make a Man correct an ill Opinion, which by Reasoning he never acquired. --Jonathan Swift (1721)

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com