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My first cabinet saw experience- Excited to Bummed to Excited again!

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Forum topic by Rency posted 05-31-2020 05:13 AM 858 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


05-31-2020 05:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw cabinet saw grizzly g1023 ty330 dust collection

Opportunity presented a bullet in the form of a Grizzly cabinet saw and I bit it. I got a true cabinet saw in great shape, 3HP, 220v, single phase, for 200 bucks, with a Unifence (which I prefer over other type of fences) and a CMT 8” dado set. Though there is no model number to be seen on the cabinet of the saw. On the motor it says model TY-330. Made in Taiwan. 1990. It looks to me a lot like G1023. If anyone can help me identify it, that will be great. Please see the pictures.

Inside the saw was very good. No caked stuff. No rust.

Just a little cleaning.

The saw was used but not abused. Great deal. So stalked.

I brought it home in my van, neighbor helped get it out on to my drive way, got in the van and moved it to park on the street. Wait. I forgot to put the seat backs in. Backed up the van into the driveway… BANG ! The van hit the saw that was behind . The saw took a fall front down. The handle on the hand wheel fold in, the cast iron wheel cracked at the part where it goes on to the elevator gear shaft and the elevator gear shaft bent up pretty bad.

From super excited to super bummed in few minutes. But I cannot stay bummed. Fortunately the shaft only got bent on the part protruding outside the cabinet. I made it straight as much as I could.

After straightening:

Here is the cracked hand wheel collar:

To fix that I went to Home Depot and got a 6” Long galvanized steel pipe fitting with an inner diameter that is about the outer diameter of the collar. A guy was nice enough to cut a small part out of it close to the length of the collar, even though they usually only cut pipes that are minimum 24” long. At home I grind the steel pipe part to the exact height of the collar and drilled a hole on the steel pipe piece to match the set screw hole on the hand wheel collar. I then put JB Weld Steel Stick (good stuff !) around the collar and put the piece of pipe over, matching the drilled hole on the pipe piece with the set screw hole on the collar. Worked out great. Here is the result:

Managed to get the screw out of the plastic handle and got a new matching screw and now that is good too.

Back to excited again!

I was not planning to take anything apart , since the saw was in good shape. Only cleaning. But now I have the arbor taken out. Going to change the belts to cog belts. Now I am thinking whether I should change the bearings on the arbor. Though there is no noise or anything it might be a good idea since the saw is from 1990. Not sure. Let me hear your opinions.

Also if I change the arbor bearings, should I change the motor bearing too ? I wouldn’t if I don’t have to.

When I turn the motor pulley there is no sound or abnormal anything I can tell. But should a motor bearing be changed every twenty years or something as a good practice? Do the motor bearing stay fine longer than the arbor bearings, hence no need to change?

I recently got a 2hp Grizzly dust collector which I am going to set up. So any suggestions for dust collection on this cabinet saw will also be appreciated.

Again no clue what the model is. Haven’t found anything from searching online with the model number TY330 found on the motor. The saw seems like a G1023. Any idea ?

This is my first cabinet saw.
Thanks in advance for sharing your experience and wisdom.

Rency.

-- Rency


24 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

8090 posts in 2972 days


#1 posted 05-31-2020 05:36 AM

Also if I change the arbor bearings, should I change the motor bearing too ? I wouldn’t if I don’t have to,

Yes (change the arbor bearings) and Yes (change the motor bearings too). Bearings have a service life – they are maintenance items and need to be replaced eventually. You have no idea when (or if) the bearings on the machine have ever been changed, or what kind of use/abuse they have taken. 20 years is really pushing the service life of a bearing and even though they may not be making any overt signs of failure, they could fail at any time without warning. Consider it cheap insurance to prevent possibly much more expensive damage down the road. Now is the time to do it, while you have things apart.

Example: Here is a Baldor 3hp motor that ran fine, made no noise or sounds that indicated bad bearings and ran quiet as a church mouse. I always replace bearings on new-to-me machines though, and glad I did – as this is what I found when I cracked open the motor:

That bearing was on it’s last leg and wouldn’t have lasted very much longer.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Rency's profile

Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#2 posted 05-31-2020 05:53 AM


Consider it cheap insurance to prevent possibly much more expensive damage down the road. Now is the time to do it, while you have things apart.

I always replace bearings on new-to-me machines though
Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

That is usually what I do too to new-to-me machines. I have a gotten a few used tools in the past in bad shape and have restored it. I love the restoring process. And every time I touch a used tool I end up changing bearings, painting it , changing all the nuts and bolts to stainless etc. This time I was trying to not scratch that itch. But I guess changing bearings is important and a good practice.

Thanks for the input.

-- Rency

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

90 posts in 158 days


#3 posted 05-31-2020 06:02 AM

Good find! 1990 was early days for Grizzly Industrial. The g1023 came out in 1995. If you purchased the machine from a home woodworker, and not from a commercial type shop, then I would not try to fix something that is not broken. Leave the bearings alone, and try the machine out. Think and practice safety.

View Rency's profile

Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#4 posted 05-31-2020 06:09 AM


Good find! 1990 was early days for Grizzly Industrial. The g1023 came out in 1995. If you purchased the machine from a home woodworker, and not from a commercial type shop, then I would not try to fix something that is not broken. Leave the bearings alone, and try the machine out. Think and practice safety.

- Jeff

The machine was at a university. They were auctioning it off and the guy I bought it from worked for the university and took it home , used it to build cabinets and such for his house.

So that’s the history.

Do you know whether the model number TY-330A , seen on the motor plate , is the actual number for the saw or not ? Cannot find anything on that number.

-- Rency

View hcbph_1's profile

hcbph_1

60 posts in 87 days


#5 posted 05-31-2020 08:41 AM

The saw is not a G1023 AFAIK mainly because the 1023 is a left tilt while this one is a right tilt. Won’t swear to it but vaguely remember seeing something like a 1025 reference to the right tilt saw at one time.
If the saw is in good shape, for $200 you got a good deal IMO.

View Rency's profile

Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#6 posted 05-31-2020 02:21 PM



The saw is not a G1023 AFAIK mainly because the 1023 is a left tilt while this one is a right tilt. Won t swear to it but vaguely remember seeing something like a 1025 reference to the right tilt saw at one time.
If the saw is in good shape, for $200 you got a good deal IMO.

- hcbph_1

There are older 1023s that are right tilting. But Jeff pointed out that 1990 was early days for Grizzly Industrial and the g1023 came out in 1995. Mine is dated 1990 according to the plate on the motor.

The saw is in good shape. And I am happy with the deal since it came with the Unisaw and Dado set.

Thanks for the encouragement.

-- Rency

View farmfromkansas's profile

farmfromkansas

188 posts in 387 days


#7 posted 05-31-2020 02:35 PM

Truth is, there should probably be sirens zeroing in on your shop.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3171 posts in 2267 days


#8 posted 05-31-2020 02:39 PM

+1 nice G1023 table saw. Paint is in remarkable condition for it’s age.
The G1023 name was copyrighted in 1990 by Grizzly, so you have early machine.


The saw is in good shape. And I am happy with the deal since it came with the Unisaw and Dado set.
- Rency

BTW – It is called a Unifence.
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2010/09/02/glory-thy-name-is-unifence

The Unisaw is actual table saw that Grizzly cloned to make the G1023.

Cheers!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

351 posts in 732 days


#9 posted 05-31-2020 03:14 PM

It’s a 1023… all of them were right tilt up to the late 90s just like the unisaw they are clones of.

1983 was early for grizzly (I have a 1983 1021 planer)

I also had a 1988 1023 that I sold last year.

View AMZ's profile

AMZ

109 posts in 162 days


#10 posted 05-31-2020 03:22 PM

Whichever handwheel was damaged, make sure to test adjustments-if it is binding, you may need to look closely on the shaft the wheel mated to, as the shaft may be bent. If bent, you should consider ordering replacement parts for everything damaged.

View Rency's profile

Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#11 posted 05-31-2020 03:29 PM

BTW – It is called a Unifence.
https://www.finewoodworking.com/2010/09/02/glory-thy-name-is-unifence

The Unisaw is actual table saw that Grizzly cloned to make the G1023.

Cheers!

- CaptainKlutz

Mistake,Typo, Error, slip of mind, or whatever from my part. :) Happens semi often. Thanks for pointing it out. I corrected it in the original post.

I have already been using a Unifence on my contractor saw. I love it . I have also read that review you shared a few times in the past . Love that review too.

-- Rency

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Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#12 posted 05-31-2020 03:34 PM



+1 nice G1023 table saw. Paint is in remarkable condition for it s age.
The G1023 name was copyrighted in 1990 by Grizzly, so you have early machine.

Cheers!

- CaptainKlutz

Thanks for the information and the encouraging words.

-- Rency

View Rency's profile

Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#13 posted 05-31-2020 03:43 PM


Truth is, there should probably be sirens zeroing in on your shop.

- farmfromkansas

Ha ha . Took a minute for me to understand. Thanks man.

-- Rency

View Rency's profile

Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#14 posted 05-31-2020 03:49 PM



It s a 1023… all of them were right tilt up to the late 90s just like the unisaw they are clones of.

1983 was early for grizzly (I have a 1983 1021 planer)

I also had a 1988 1023 that I sold last year.

- Jared_S

Finally I am being convinced that it is 1023. Thanks for the info. Why the heck is it saying Model number TY-330A on the motor? I guess it could be just the motor’s model number. Did your 1988 1023 had the number on the cabinet ? Did it have a different number on the motor ? Any recollection. Just curious

Thanks again

-- Rency

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Rency

52 posts in 1138 days


#15 posted 05-31-2020 03:51 PM


Whichever handwheel was damaged, make sure to test adjustments-if it is binding, you may need to look closely on the shaft the wheel mated to, as the shaft may be bent. If bent, you should consider ordering replacement parts for everything damaged.

- AMZ

It is turning and adjusting the height without any problem. No binding or any issues. Thanks for the suggestions.

-- Rency

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