LumberJocks

Best joint for me?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by flamingoezz posted 05-31-2020 12:19 AM 349 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View flamingoezz's profile

flamingoezz

25 posts in 1727 days


05-31-2020 12:19 AM

I was making a simple entertainment unit—essentially just a open box (no doors) with some metal legs. I planned on mitered dovetails but it seems like my sides warped a bit on me since gluing them up. They have a bit of a cup now. Not sure how well they’d pull together with that type of joint. Anyone know if it is worth trying?

If not, what are some other ways i can assemble? I was thinking I could sink screws into the top from the sides to pull it together and dowel. to hide it. Prefer not to show much end grain—any other options for me?


7 replies so far

View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

422 posts in 3119 days


#1 posted 05-31-2020 02:16 AM

Here are a couple options that come to mind…
Do you have a lock mitre bit? Would show no endgrain. Not sure how much of a cup you have that needs to be pulled out.
Could drill and countersink screws, then plug with a same or contrasting wood.
Another option would be mitre your edge, then use a corner key doweling jig to add strength. Could make your own or get Rockler's Corner Key Doweling Jig

Others may have better ideas.
Be sure to post pics when when you get it finished.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View Walker's profile

Walker

384 posts in 1242 days


#2 posted 05-31-2020 03:49 AM

Corner key dowels are good idea. I was going to suggested dovetail keys which are similar (also known as Faux Dovetails). You make a miter joint, then using a jig and a dovetail bit you cut out through the corner. Insert some dovetail shaped keys, then flush cut. The cool thing is you can then round over the corner, it looks pretty cool. Here is a kitchen cart I made with dovetail keys. Unfortunately it is riddled with design flaws that caused my miters to pull apart. But an open box like your design would be less susceptible to that.

Btw, I made that enormous jig so I could clamp once and not have to re-set to get the spacing right. You can make a much simpler jig to handle one cut at a time.

-- ~Walker

View flamingoezz's profile

flamingoezz

25 posts in 1727 days


#3 posted 05-31-2020 05:31 AM

looked up dovetail keys and they look awesome. Not sure exactly how I would pull it off. I’ve seen people make jigs and rout the dovetail once assembled, but this thing is like 80” x 20”. Not something I can slide through a router table on a jig. Any ideas there?


Corner key dowels are good idea. I was going to suggested dovetail keys which are similar (also known as Faux Dovetails). You make a miter joint, then using a jig and a dovetail bit you cut out through the corner. Insert some dovetail shaped keys, then flush cut. The cool thing is you can then round over the corner, it looks pretty cool. Here is a kitchen cart I made with dovetail keys. Unfortunately it is riddled with design flaws that caused my miters to pull apart. But an open box like your design would be less susceptible to that.

Btw, I made that enormous jig so I could clamp once and not have to re-set to get the spacing right. You can make a much simpler jig to handle one cut at a time.

- Walker


View Axis39's profile

Axis39

232 posts in 367 days


#4 posted 05-31-2020 01:55 PM

Instead of taking the workpiece to a router table, make a small jig and bring the router to the workpiece.

I am thinking of something like the typical mortising jig. It would have a flat table, with a slot for a guide busing, then you could have a two or more ‘legs’, with a 45 deg angle cut into the bottom that would fit over the corner of your piece.

But, of course, this would require you to have the joint assembled prior to routing… If your piece is already cupped, that might be a problem.

You could always do something like pocket holes to hold it together and tight while the glue sets, then do splines of any shape, dovetail, rectangular, etc.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View Walker's profile

Walker

384 posts in 1242 days


#5 posted 05-31-2020 04:44 PM

Axis39 is right. Make a jig that clamps on to the corner of your workpiece. I’m trying to find a good photo example for the single cut at a time model. It’s a tough search. Hopefully you can get the idea and design something yourself.

https://3dwoodworkingplans.com/076-dovetail-spline-jig/
https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/206498
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msRFniw4w3U

-- ~Walker

View flamingoezz's profile

flamingoezz

25 posts in 1727 days


#6 posted 06-09-2020 04:13 AM

thanks for the jig ideas. I bought a dovetail bit and will start working on a jig. Wondering now if I’ll need a bigger router to do the job in one pass. I have a bosch colt.

Considering these— Bosch 1617EVSPK 2.25 HP, or Dewalt DW618PKB 2.25HP. Any pros/cons on those routers/brands?

View Walker's profile

Walker

384 posts in 1242 days


#7 posted 06-09-2020 04:58 AM

Either of those are fine kits. I have the 1617EVSP pack myself, and find it does everything I need.

However, you don’t need to do it in one pass. Use a straight bit first to hog out most of the waste. If necessary, in multiple passes until you reach the depth you want. Then make a final pass with the dovetail bit. Make sure the straight bit isn’t any wider then the top of the dovetail bit. Practice on scrap or a smaller project first.

The other thing to figure out is cutting the keys. You can do it on a router table, but I think it’s easier on a table saw. Use a long workpiece, rip cut the angles, then you can cross cut into smaller pieces. It’s also better to use a wider workpiece for more control. Ripping a 3/4” piece off of a 6” wide stock is much safer then trying to cut angles on both sides of a 3/4” x 3/4” strip.

-- ~Walker

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com