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Use of Kreg screws into a wall

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Forum topic by Oldtool posted 05-27-2020 06:11 PM 364 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Oldtool

2959 posts in 2968 days


05-27-2020 06:11 PM

I made a set of window cornices for my son & daughter-in-law, with French Cleats for hanging them. The cleats were made from 1 X 4 pine cut in half horizontally at a 45 deg. angle. My intention to install these is by using 2 1/2” Kreg screws because they have a washer type head for secure holding, the serrated threads to self tap, and a square drive for the power required. Driving these I’ll be going through the 3/4” cleat, half inch of plaster, half inch of plasterboard, then the wall stud.
My question to anyone who may have tried this is: do I need to drill a pilot hole first, to get through the plastered wall?
My hesitation stems from the one inch of plaster & plasterboard.

If you’ve done something similar, let me know how you made out.
Thanks,
Tom

PS: This photo is on it’s back, i tried rotating, retaking photo in portrate rather than landscape, nothing works. Sorry.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln


16 replies so far

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recycle1943

4502 posts in 2399 days


#1 posted 05-27-2020 06:18 PM

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

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recycle1943

4502 posts in 2399 days


#2 posted 05-27-2020 06:22 PM

the only thing that comes to mind is that if you don’t pilot to the wall stud you may have a mess of dust dribbling from behind
I think I would drill a pilot thru the plaster, clean up and mount

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

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Oldtool

2959 posts in 2968 days


#3 posted 05-27-2020 06:34 PM



the only thing that comes to mind is that if you don t pilot to the wall stud you may have a mess of dust dribbling from behind
I think I would drill a pilot thru the plaster, clean up and mount

- recycle1943

Thanks Dick, I suppose as usual, I’m overthinking this. Nice trick with the photo. I tried to import both a landscape & portrait version and the site kept tilting the result. Did so even after I rotated the original by 90 degrees first. Go figure.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5430 posts in 1359 days


#4 posted 05-27-2020 06:45 PM

I’m with Dick on this. When putting screws into the walls in my Minneaoplis house (built in 1929), the two reasons I found to drill a pilot hole were to cut down on plaster after the fact, and to avoid cracking if I hit a hard-spot (my plaster had been patched by someone who had used a concrete-patch or something similarly hard on it, so there were spots that were like rock – better to hit that with a drill bit than a screw).

As for the type of screws, I’ve found standard wood screws to be fine, as well as standard sheetrock screws. Both require setting the clutch on my electric screwdriver correctly so I didn’t pull the head through a pine cleat, but otherwise the all held reasonably well if I got into the oak studs.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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Dave Polaschek

5430 posts in 1359 days


#5 posted 05-27-2020 06:46 PM

For the images, I’ve found that if I crop the image slightly, that changes things so that the site doesn’t get confused. Doesn’t take much, and it’s quicker to do on my phone than rotating, oh damn, wrong direction, ok, that didn’t work…

-- Dave - Santa Fe

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Oldtool

2959 posts in 2968 days


#6 posted 05-27-2020 06:57 PM

Thanks Dave,
I suppose drilling a pilot hole through the plaster would be wise. If I hit concrete, my son is on his own, I did the build – he can do the hard work.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2539 posts in 3415 days


#7 posted 05-28-2020 01:59 PM

Lee Valley sells a special “drywall nut” which allows the load to be transferred more directly to the stud.

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/hardware/fasteners/nuts-and-bolts/72514-veritas-drywall-nuts

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Oldtool

2959 posts in 2968 days


#8 posted 05-28-2020 04:03 PM

Ocelot, very interesting, didn’t know about these items.
They look to be a good sound method to mount items on walls, solid mechanical transfer of weight directly to the studs. At the price they’re asking though, my two 7 foot cornices would cost more to install than they cost to make. I believe they’re worth the price, being a machined item with a great deal of strength, but are designed to hang a much heavier weight than what I intend to hang. They are rated 450 lbs in shear, the cornices are only about 5 lb.
Thanks for the input.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13397 posts in 3157 days


#9 posted 05-28-2020 04:06 PM

You can buy “cabinet screws” with a washer head that might be a better value than Kreg screws.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Ocelot

2539 posts in 3415 days


#10 posted 05-28-2020 06:09 PM


Ocelot, very interesting, didn t know about these items.
They look to be a good sound method to mount items on walls, solid mechanical transfer of weight directly to the studs. At the price they re asking though, my two 7 foot cornices would cost more to install than they cost to make. I believe they re worth the price, being a machined item with a great deal of strength, but are designed to hang a much heavier weight than what I intend to hang. They are rated 450 lbs in shear, the cornices are only about 5 lb.
Thanks for the input.

- Oldtool

Yeah. I haven’t bought any either. They are designed for hanging seating on the wall. But at $6/screw….

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Oldtool

2959 posts in 2968 days


#11 posted 05-28-2020 06:17 PM

Well just in case someone else considers using Kreg screws for attaching to walls, I asked Kreg and this is what I was told:

Hello Mr. Baker,

Thank you for contacting Kreg Tool Company.  That is a great question.  You will not need to pre-drill when using the Kreg Pocket-Hole System.  The Kreg Screws are designed to cut it’s own pilot hole when installing.  Again, thank you for contacting Kreg Tool Company and feel free to contact us with any further questions.

Thanks,
Andy 

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

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bondogaposis

5791 posts in 3128 days


#12 posted 05-28-2020 06:20 PM

I’m not sure how heavy your cabinets are or what is going to be put in them, but I would go with 3” screws. With 2 1/2” screws you will have more screw in the plaster than the stud.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Oldtool

2959 posts in 2968 days


#13 posted 05-28-2020 06:24 PM

You can buy “cabinet screws” with a washer head that might be a better value than Kreg screws.

—Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

Rick, I looked up cabinet screws, to me they look identical to Kreg screws, washer head and serrated threads:

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

800 posts in 956 days


#14 posted 05-29-2020 02:41 AM

The kreg 2.5” screws are good for your project.

The screw in the picture above looks more like a “real” cabinet hanging screw. Bigger head, bigger shaft. They would be stronger than the kreg 2.5”. Not that you need it

Kreg screws very affordable if bought from the right place. Not sure why that came up….

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SMP

2132 posts in 683 days


#15 posted 05-29-2020 03:16 AM

I’ve used kreg screws for many things like that. The inly issue i have run into is if the back of the piece is flat, some screws will excavate the drywall dust and kind of push that side of the piece out. So i’ll either hold it away from the wall, drive it in most of the way, then reverse it, then drive it back in to clear the dust. If you have 1/4” lip etc then you wont have to.

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