LumberJocks

Project Book(s)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Dawg23 posted 05-26-2020 10:37 PM 285 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Dawg23's profile

Dawg23

18 posts in 49 days


05-26-2020 10:37 PM

Does anyone keep a project notebook while doing your projects? I have started one with sketches, ideas, drawings, blades i use in saws, sandpaper frequently bought, etc.

Mine also has lots of shorthand and abbreviations of the wood used, future project ideas, local wood sources besides the big box stores, and techniques that I want to try.

Is it too much to do, or am i overthinking it a bit?

Or are the best projects built with a sketch on the back of a napkin, or totally off the cuff?


12 replies so far

View GrumpyGolfGuy's profile

GrumpyGolfGuy

52 posts in 66 days


#1 posted 05-26-2020 11:16 PM

I have a “project book” I jot down ideas and such. What works, what doesn’t, I also plan out projects on separate sheets of paper, then when I get it to some degree of finalization, I transfer the info to the book. Now you’d think the I’d be able to keep track of that book…...NOT. I have at least 3 or 4 going…DOH!!!! I also have all my patterns (scroll saw stuff) in a data base on my computer so when I get an idea of want to find a project, I have something I can access to remember what I have.

Chris

View Dawg23's profile

Dawg23

18 posts in 49 days


#2 posted 05-26-2020 11:56 PM

I started out with a half used 5×8 pad, marking dimensions, making a cut list, and sketching. After i was done i was trashing the sheets. After a few things done, i decided to keep one notebook (so far). Especially since i am doing a few items of the same original project.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

5608 posts in 1360 days


#3 posted 05-27-2020 01:18 AM

I use Evernote for shop notes. I can save photos of setups for future reference, step-by-step details, etc. For designs, I use SketchUp.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1362 posts in 1358 days


#4 posted 05-27-2020 05:48 PM

For years I’ve kept one of those school 5-subject inch-thick spiral bound note books in the shop with a pen in the spine. Each project gets a page (or more) that is titled, dated, and initialed for copyright. You have to add the circled “c” and the words “all rights reserved” for it to be legally binding.

I do all my sketches and cipher’n in ink. If I have to make changes they’re in my layout .5 mm pencil.

The spiral bound format is nice since it lays flat with one full size page showing and the pen acts as a natural bookmark. Its thick enough to write on without needing any additional support. The pad is small enough to carry to the cust site and into the shop but large enough enough to show a sketch with room for dimensions and not get lost in the shop or the truck.


150 page project book

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1179 posts in 1321 days


#5 posted 05-27-2020 07:33 PM

Yep. I use one of the books from hobby lobby that are made for folks to draw in. It’s been years since I’ve drawn but the book has came in handy for planning my projects since I rarely use plans which I prefer, I also play guitar by ear and when I use to draw and paint I did it by hand not tracing. Probably just the way our brains are wired. I use to know a guy that could pick guitar very well using scales but couldn’t figure out chords. Kind of like the economics professor that I in debt up to his eyes vs the price of farmer that has thousands in the bank and under the chicken coop…..oops, I’ve said to much

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

879 posts in 425 days


#6 posted 05-27-2020 07:51 PM



I have a “project book” I jot down ideas and such. What works, what doesn t, I also plan out projects on separate sheets of paper, then when I get it to some degree of finalization, I transfer the info to the book. Now you d think the I d be able to keep track of that book…...NOT. I have at least 3 or 4 going…DOH!!!! I also have all my patterns (scroll saw stuff) in a data base on my computer so when I get an idea of want to find a project, I have something I can access to remember what I have.

Chris

- GrumpyGolfGuy

I prefer a spiral bound steno pad but ya i’ve got a handful of them floating around the shop and house. I even write what they are for on the front like home lab, house improvements, shop, etc but just end up grabbing the one i can find at the time and using it until the project is over.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1179 posts in 497 days


#7 posted 05-27-2020 08:08 PM

Since I do it as a business, this is what I do.

Everything gets saved in a folder, with the customers name on it, and when the job is done it goes into the client file drawer.

I keep all the estimates/proposals/invoices in the file.
I list all the vendors I bought from for the materials, and whether I paid tax or not so that I can fill out my use tax.

On the other side, I keep all of my scratch notes and pictures or drawings that go with the job. When I make changes I try to make them on the drawings also so that if I have to go back to them, and I have, I will be able to duplicate the change or find a measurement.

All vendor receipts go into the appropriate vendor files. Which I save by year.

At the same time everything also gets entered into Quickbooks.

I have a paper trail that I can go back 7 or 8 years to an old client, find the vendor list, find the receipts for the job and what material and how much I paid for it.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

879 posts in 425 days


#8 posted 05-27-2020 08:13 PM

Thanks LeeRoyMan – that is not a bad setup to use even for us hobbyists. Might skip the Quickbooks part and keep receipts with the project folder but its a great way to stay organized and be able to find a project you did awhile ago if you ever get asked to make another.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1179 posts in 497 days


#9 posted 05-27-2020 08:15 PM


Thanks LeeRoyMan – that is not a bad setup to use even for us hobbyists. Might skip the Quickbooks part and keep receipts with the project folder but its a great way to stay organized and be able to find a project you did awhile ago if you ever get asked to make another.

- sansoo22


Just to be clear, I only write down the receipts invoice number, and amounts on my spread sheet. I then file the actual receipt in the vendor files in a separate folder for the appropriate vendors.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View pottz's profile

pottz

9847 posts in 1755 days


#10 posted 05-27-2020 11:23 PM

everything i do is a mere sketch with the dimensions at best,but do whatever works best for you.some guys spend the time making sketchup drawings some even make scale models before making the actual project.hell sometimes the whole process is only in my head,but thats what works for me.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View 987Ron's profile

987Ron

45 posts in 87 days


#11 posted 05-27-2020 11:37 PM

I’ve keep a project book or journal over the years. Guilty of not entering all projects. Like to keep the wood used and the finish applied. How it turned out, would I use it again etc Lee Valley has a Veritas Workshop Design Pad that I started using for planning. It is spiral bound, has a grid that works for inches down to 1/16”. Marked on two sides with 0 to 8 inches on the end and 0 to 11 inches along the bottom The top edge is marked in metric. Similar to their padded design pads but with the spiral.
I have some inherited journals of my Dads. He was an accomplished violin/viola maker. His journals gave the woods used, where obtained, how long aged. Varnish recipes, the violin or viola number when built, who it was sold or given to, price, date etc. Lots of notes of technique tried. Dad is gone but his journal and work live on. Gives all of us great joy to peruse them. Inspiration and more.

-- It's not a mistake it's a design opportunity

View Dawg23's profile

Dawg23

18 posts in 49 days


#12 posted 05-30-2020 01:41 AM

I spend time in my books drawing out my plans, dimensions, and sketchs of what i need to do. I take the sketches and make a prototype of what i would like to try and see how it looks before I goto the final project. I think some of the prototypes are a fallback to my engineering degree and days of try it before we produce. I really am glad i am not the only one to do a book for later reference.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com