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Are the open-end drum sanders really effective on a two-pass operation?

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Forum topic by BenDupre posted 05-26-2020 06:44 PM 595 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BenDupre

745 posts in 1264 days


05-26-2020 06:44 PM

Considering a drum sander for the shop. It would be used on chess boards, cutting boards, and maybe some inlays. Would love to have a 12 inch, but no one makes one. The closest I can find is the Jet 10-20.

https://www.rockler.com/jet-jwds-1020-benchtop-drum-sander?sid=V9177&utm_source=criteo&utm_medium=display&utm_campaign=lower_funnel

Question for the membership: Are these really effective using two passes as suggested to do a 20 inch wide panel. I am dubious.

What say you all?

Thanks,

Ben

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw


15 replies so far

View tbone's profile

tbone

306 posts in 4461 days


#1 posted 05-26-2020 06:58 PM

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/jet-16-32-drum-sander-model-jwds-1632?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjpDes5nS6QIVCXkqCh2c_QLMEAAYASAAEgJxyfD_BwE

There are others out there. I have this one, and once it’s set up properly, it will do a real good job, but it’s also s-l-o-w. (A tip—when you run your project in one direction then turn the material around, your grain will be kind of laying in opposite directions. So make sure you raise the grain and finish sand by hand.)

-- Kinky Friedman: "The first thing I'll do if I'm elected is demand a recount."

View John's profile

John

1816 posts in 2046 days


#2 posted 05-26-2020 08:06 PM

Hi Ben, I have the 19” 38” supermax. I haven’t tried anything wider than 19” yet. What I can say is that this is a super useful tool. I use it all the time on all kinds of projects. Grits from 36 to 180 are what I use. It has been most awesome on all my end grain cutting boards.

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

24800 posts in 3882 days


#3 posted 05-26-2020 08:09 PM

Look at the Supermax
https://www.southern-tool.com/store/supermax_tools.php?a

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3798 posts in 1998 days


#4 posted 05-26-2020 09:38 PM

You will always get a ridge since it’s near impossible to adjust true and compensate for the ever so slight bending of the drum that occurs under load. That said, get the sander dialed in and the ridge can be removed easily with traditional methods.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1651 posts in 3569 days


#5 posted 05-26-2020 10:43 PM

Grizzly has a 12” for $695.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3088 posts in 2574 days


#6 posted 05-26-2020 10:59 PM

I had a Perform-x 16/32. It was very slow any grit finer then 120 would make it even slower because the paper would load up and burn.
It did work fine for ordinary domestic woods but anything exotic of oily could load the paper and burn.
I sold it at least 10 years ago. It’s one of those machines I wish I would not have bought.
I would suggest you practice milling your wood so you don’t need a drum sander.

Good Luck

-- Aj

View farmfromkansas's profile

farmfromkansas

194 posts in 390 days


#7 posted 05-27-2020 12:55 AM

I have an open end wide belt sander, 15”, Grizzly G9983. Awesome sander.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

4103 posts in 3885 days


#8 posted 05-27-2020 03:26 AM

I have a Jet 10-20 and only use it for boards 10” or less. I’ve has less than satisfactory results running a wider board through. Can’t be bothered to fiddle with it. I’ll get the thickness with my router sled and then sand. With the right sander it goes pretty quickly after that.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

9476 posts in 2819 days


#9 posted 05-27-2020 03:34 AM

I have the jet 10-20 for so long now I don’t remember when I bought it, and it works great. I had to adjust the drum slightly once over the years when doing something wider than the 10’’ but the instruction were great. If you have room for a bigger one then I would suggest that but if not the 10-20 is a great little sander.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View moke's profile

moke

1558 posts in 3552 days


#10 posted 05-27-2020 03:50 PM

I have a 19-38…Its pretty good, I get a slight”hump”. which is easy to take out with a ROS.

-- Mike

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5807 posts in 3085 days


#11 posted 05-27-2020 04:23 PM

I have a Bridgewood 15 inch opened Wide Belt Sander. It will do what you ask with no problem/witness lines. So I can do 30 inch panels. As mentioned setup is key.

As a side note. If you go thru the owners manual of the Bridge and the Grizzly they look almost identical. I’m sure they come from the same design and factory. Mine has a Baldor or motor. At the time the Bridgewood dealer in the US would pull what ever motor it came with replacing it with the Baldor motor.

Now that Bridgewood is no longer in production I see many on the Felder’s owner’s Group are recommend the Northstate wide belt which is very similar to the Grizzly and the Bridge wood.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View pottz's profile

pottz

9903 posts in 1760 days


#12 posted 05-27-2020 05:28 PM



https://www.woodcraft.com/products/jet-16-32-drum-sander-model-jwds-1632?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjpDes5nS6QIVCXkqCh2c_QLMEAAYASAAEgJxyfD_BwE

There are others out there. I have this one, and once it s set up properly, it will do a real good job, but it s also s-l-o-w. (A tip—when you run your project in one direction then turn the material around, your grain will be kind of laying in opposite directions. So make sure you raise the grain and finish sand by hand.)

- tbone


ive got this same sander works very well and use it all the time.ive had no problem with ridges,i use it only for rough sanding with 120 grit or less then finish with a ros.great time saver.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5807 posts in 3085 days


#13 posted 05-27-2020 05:55 PM


https://www.woodcraft.com/products/jet-16-32-drum-sander-model-jwds-1632?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjpDes5nS6QIVCXkqCh2c_QLMEAAYASAAEgJxyfD_BwE

There are others out there. I have this one, and once it s set up properly, it will do a real good job, but it s also s-l-o-w. (A tip—when you run your project in one direction then turn the material around, your grain will be kind of laying in opposite directions. So make sure you raise the grain and finish sand by hand.)

- tbone

ive got this same sander works very well and use it all the time.ive had no problem with ridges,i use it only for rough sanding with 120 grit or less then finish with a ros.great time saver.

- pottz


This brings up a point. All these sanding machines (at least in hobby area price range machines) are not the end of the sanding process. You still have to follow up with final sanding/scraping. The sand machine are great for get stock readyfor final sanding with your ROS or and hand sanding. They will save a lot of time and they do a good job at flatting sock also. That does not mean it will replace a jointer and or planer. I use mine mostly of sanding glued up panels to take care of the minor miss aliments between boards.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View pottz's profile

pottz

9903 posts in 1760 days


#14 posted 05-27-2020 10:29 PM


https://www.woodcraft.com/products/jet-16-32-drum-sander-model-jwds-1632?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjpDes5nS6QIVCXkqCh2c_QLMEAAYASAAEgJxyfD_BwE

There are others out there. I have this one, and once it s set up properly, it will do a real good job, but it s also s-l-o-w. (A tip—when you run your project in one direction then turn the material around, your grain will be kind of laying in opposite directions. So make sure you raise the grain and finish sand by hand.)

- tbone

ive got this same sander works very well and use it all the time.ive had no problem with ridges,i use it only for rough sanding with 120 grit or less then finish with a ros.great time saver.

- pottz

This brings up a point. All these sanding machines (at least in hobby area price range machines) are not the end of the sanding process. You still have to follow up with final sanding/scraping. The sand machine are great for get stock readyfor final sanding with your ROS or and hand sanding. They will save a lot of time and they do a good job at flatting sock also. That does not mean it will replace a jointer and or planer. I use mine mostly of sanding glued up panels to take care of the minor miss aliments between boards.

- AlaskaGuy


yes very true they are not the last step.my dad used to use his as a planer,he was constantly burning up belts-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

745 posts in 1264 days


#15 posted 05-27-2020 10:44 PM


https://www.woodcraft.com/products/jet-16-32-drum-sander-model-jwds-1632?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjpDes5nS6QIVCXkqCh2c_QLMEAAYASAAEgJxyfD_BwE

There are others out there. I have this one, and once it s set up properly, it will do a real good job, but it s also s-l-o-w. (A tip—when you run your project in one direction then turn the material around, your grain will be kind of laying in opposite directions. So make sure you raise the grain and finish sand by hand.)

- tbone

ive got this same sander works very well and use it all the time.ive had no problem with ridges,i use it only for rough sanding with 120 grit or less then finish with a ros.great time saver.

- pottz

This brings up a point. All these sanding machines (at least in hobby area price range machines) are not the end of the sanding process. You still have to follow up with final sanding/scraping. The sand machine are great for get stock readyfor final sanding with your ROS or and hand sanding. They will save a lot of time and they do a good job at flatting sock also. That does not mean it will replace a jointer and or planer. I use mine mostly of sanding glued up panels to take care of the minor miss aliments between boards.

- AlaskaGuy

As you suggest – for flattening glue-ups, and for thicknessing very thin material like one might use in inlays. I have used a belt sander on the chess boards, but it’s brutal.

Sounds like the larger machine and a single pass are better – as per expectation. THANKS ALL

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

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