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Requesting advice on refinishing painted cedar beams

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Forum topic by Dman1989 posted 05-23-2020 08:58 PM 187 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dman1989

4 posts in 7 days


05-23-2020 08:58 PM

I have a project coming up where I need to refinish cedar beams on a beautiful ipe deck.

These posts have been treated with a penetrating stain. Pained over. Twice. And now all that paint is peeking.

I need advice, are the beams capable of being brought back to a point where they will accept a penetrating stain even though some of the paint clearly did bond and and the wood has seen a penetrating product of some kind before?

Does anyone have experience with such work and if so how successful is sanding going to be at preparing the cedar for a new penetrating coat and will the new coat, let’s say it’s a semi solid oil based stain, look decent or will the previous applications hinder its look and bondability in some way?


7 replies so far

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John Smith

2347 posts in 897 days


#1 posted 05-23-2020 11:37 PM

welcome to the forum.
photos of your concerns will always get you the most
accurate responses.

.

-- I am a painter: that's what I do, I like to paint things. --

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LesB

2512 posts in 4177 days


#2 posted 05-24-2020 12:18 AM

John is right about photos.

How do you plan to remove the old finish? Start with a paint remover or deck dleaner. Then scrape and sand to the raw wood. If the wood is still “discolored” you can try cleaning it up with deck brightener or oxalic acid. Follow instructons. Then you can apply the new stain sealer. Do be aware that the stain sealer will only stand up to the elements for about 2 to 3 years then you will need to use a deck cleaner and brightener and start over. I’m sure that is why someone painted them. Cedar will naturally become a gray color if you do nothing and some people opt for that.
If all that discourages you the wood can just be cleaned up by scraping and sanding to a sound base then apply an exterior primer and followed by an exterior paint. That should last from 5 to 15 years.

Be sure to protect the Ipe decking while your are doing this work.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Dman1989

4 posts in 7 days


#3 posted 05-24-2020 12:34 AM

Alrighty John- This is a test run- hope the photos come through.

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Dman1989

4 posts in 7 days


#4 posted 05-24-2020 12:54 AM

Literally this deck is located in a mtn paradise! Western North Carolina… and its technically a rainforest. This deck will see roughly 80-100” of rain a year and we would absolutely plan to be reapplying every other year if we can get something semi solid to work on the post. Decking

is fine- framing great- skirt board will be replaced all together- it’s just those darn posts that look so bad. He keeps stressing how important the natural wood is to him and he is trying to avoid covering it as it seems in this climate the paint really acts like a bag for the moisture the seeps in off the deck. Any thoughts are greatly appreciated-

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LesB

2512 posts in 4177 days


#5 posted 05-24-2020 05:05 PM

Looks like beautiful country, I live in rainy Oregon but it gets only about 1/2 that much rain.
That is not a “fun” job. I would apply paint remover and use a scraper to get the paint off then sand smooth and if needed treat with a deck cleaning product. Then you can apply a deck sealer/stain.

For scraping I have had good luck with one made by Warner model 741. It has a curved double edge blade that is easily sharpened with a file or grinder. It is inexpensive and the blade is replaceable. Best I have ever tried for scraping paint and other finishes.

Now, Wagner (note this is not Warner…similar names) makes a Disc Sander called Paint Eater (about $70) that looks like it would do the job. I haven’t used this one but years ago I did rent a power paint remover to clean old paint on the side of the house. It used a grit embedded metal disc to literally cut the paint off of house siding.The depth of cut was adjustable. It worked well but the wood needed sanding afterward because the paint removal was a bit rough. This Wagner tool may be just what you need to speed up the job and eliminate the messy paint remover and hand scraping.

-- Les B, Oregon

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LesB

2512 posts in 4177 days


#6 posted 05-26-2020 04:19 PM

After seeing your pictures and ruminating on the problem I came up with another idea.
Using a router with a planing bit set to remove 1/32nd of an inch or less. You would need to make up a router guide that would clamp onto the post. That would produce a clean wood surface to refinish. Except for places the router can’t reach this should be fast and clean.

For more info on this process just Google “router plaining”.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Dman1989

4 posts in 7 days


#7 posted 05-27-2020 12:35 AM

Nice one Les- I will definitly do a little research. Can see the appropriate jig in my head.

I assume if my jig was to clamp tight to the post I wouldnt have much of a chance of doing damage to the corners. Some posts have splits and cracks running off the edge and that would be my only concern that the router might catch one of those and rip it off. Overall- I love that idea and think it definilty has the potential to be a timesaver. Thanks to all for your input so far. Will keep this going with some progress shots of the work.

Just a follow up to the comment about the weather around here. In the last 6 days we have recieved 15.5”. And the most I have ever recorded for a year was 112”, but 80” is average.

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