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Which blade to not have splinters

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Forum topic by 125mph posted 05-22-2020 06:28 PM 382 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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125mph

8 posts in 6 days


05-22-2020 06:28 PM

I need to rip and crosscut some cherry wood boards and plywood panels for a kitchen cabinet reface project. The cherry board is to be ripped to 2” wide so that it goes under the floating cabinets shelves.

I used a general blade recently and noticed a lot of splintering and cracks on the boards afterwards.

Do I use a 60 teeth or 80 teeth blade?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-10-in-x-60-Teeth-Fine-Finish-Saw-Blade-D1060X/100033809
or

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-10-in-x-80-Teeth-Ultra-Finish-Saw-Blade-D1080X/100022265


21 replies so far

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

542 posts in 1157 days


#1 posted 05-22-2020 06:50 PM

You’re going to get burning trying to rip with either of those blades. Ideally you’d want a dedicated rip blade and dedicated crosscut blade. One of those is probably fine for crosscuts, but check out the glue-line rip blade for clean rips. It will have much less teeth.

That being said, I’ve had really great luck with my Freud General Purpose blade fresh back from a good sharpening. I’ve really been impressed, even handles resaws with ease. This would be my vote for a single blade.

If you really wanted to spend, then an Amana or Forrest general purpose would be even better, but it seems you’re not looking to break by bank by your suggestions. IMO the Freud blades are pretty good if sharp and clean.

View 125mph's profile

125mph

8 posts in 6 days


#2 posted 05-22-2020 06:56 PM

Is this the one you’re talking about? https://www.rockler.com/freud-lu72-general-purpose-saw-blades

It only has 40teeth. Is that enough for a smooth cut?

Thanks!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5275 posts in 4691 days


#3 posted 05-22-2020 08:43 PM

24 tooth rip (glue line) and 80 tooth crosscut. Don’t try to go too slow ‘cause the cherry will burn the cut line edges.
That’s what I use.

-- [email protected]

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

938 posts in 2380 days


#4 posted 05-22-2020 09:06 PM

For ripping, get a RIP plade. Usually 24 tooth. I hope you are not expecting the saw to give the final finish, but a good ( even cheap Diablo like I use) is within a pass of a scraper.

For the plywood, get a good 60 or 80 croscut. You may still need to tape both sides. Sometimes you need to score with a knife for a perfect edge, or make your first cut only a hairs breath.

Comblo blades do everything, but nothing well. Get the right blade for the job.

View 125mph's profile

125mph

8 posts in 6 days


#5 posted 05-22-2020 09:08 PM

Okay so after I rip it, how do I get the smooth edge? Sand? So the 24T ripping blade wont cause any chipping and stuff in solid wood or plywood?


For ripping, get a RIP plade. Usually 24 tooth. I hope you are not expecting the saw to give the final finish, but a good ( even cheap Diablo like I use) is within a pass of a scraper.

For the plywood, get a good 60 or 80 croscut. You may still need to tape both sides. Sometimes you need to score with a knife for a perfect edge, or make your first cut only a hairs breath.

Comblo blades do everything, but nothing well. Get the right blade for the job.

- tvrgeek


View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1323 posts in 3814 days


#6 posted 05-22-2020 09:52 PM



Comblo blades do everything, but nothing well.
- tvrgeek

And once again, completely, 100% WRONG.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

2993 posts in 2225 days


#7 posted 05-22-2020 10:05 PM

Cheap TK Diablo blades will splinter every plywood panel known to man. Even the 100 tooth fine cut is marginal on splinter prone oak veneer panels. If want chip free plywood cuts, need proper tooth angles on real plywood blade.

I like the Freud LU97M010 for all around work as it lasts longer and leaves best edge on Melamine/MDF. The Freud LU80R010 Ultimate Plywood blade is cheaper, leaves nice finish as long as it is sharp, but Hi-ATB teeth tend to dull quicker. Since plywood is typically thin, suggest a full width blade regardless of saw type as think kerf versions can deflect – especially on angled cuts. Tenryu makes a really nice Mel-Pro blade for cutting man made woods too, but they cost a lot more.

BTW – Cherry burns very easy. Many things can cause this beside the blade choice. Looks for things like: Cut to slow, dull blade, dirty blade, fence/blade not set accurately, or improper feeding technique. So if/when you use proper rip blade and you still get burning, can look at other reasons.

If you insist on using one blade for everything, then you will have to make compromise in the cut quality.
Additional education FWIW:
Tips for Picking Saw blades blog post on Lumberjocks

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/essential-tablesaw-blades/

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

938 posts in 2380 days


#8 posted 05-22-2020 11:25 PM

We will have to disagree. How much for my Ridge Carbide? Like new. Used it about twice and went back to the correct blade for the job.

Comblo blades do everything, but nothing well.
- tvrgeek

And once again, completely, 100% WRONG.

- Tony_S


View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

938 posts in 2380 days


#9 posted 05-22-2020 11:29 PM

Plane, scrape, sand. A saw cuts wood. It does not finish wood. Some side planing “glue-line” rip blades can do that, but it is still not finish, just good enough to glue instead of using a joiner.

Rip blades are for ripping solid stock. Riop, with the grain.

Crosscut blades are for crosscutting. Just like they say. Plywood by definition is crosscut. No chipping? Maybe you need to invest in a laser. You are dealing with wood. As I mentioned, the proper blade, tape or maybe pre-scribe is how you get a clean edge.


Okay so after I rip it, how do I get the smooth edge? Sand? So the 24T ripping blade wont cause any chipping and stuff in solid wood or plywood?

For ripping, get a RIP plade. Usually 24 tooth. I hope you are not expecting the saw to give the final finish, but a good ( even cheap Diablo like I use) is within a pass of a scraper.

For the plywood, get a good 60 or 80 croscut. You may still need to tape both sides. Sometimes you need to score with a knife for a perfect edge, or make your first cut only a hairs breath.

Comblo blades do everything, but nothing well. Get the right blade for the job.

- tvrgeek

- 125mph


View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

938 posts in 2380 days


#10 posted 05-22-2020 11:35 PM

Freud LU80R010. I’ll try one of them. I have a new wide CMT rip as I needed a flat tooth for a job. I have not compared it to my cheap Diablo in 3 inch hardwood yet. Been too busy working on my Triumph.

My 60 and 80 tooth Diablos way out-preformed either my Freud Fusion or Ridge Carbide in plywood. I hope the above does even one step better!

View 125mph's profile

125mph

8 posts in 6 days


#11 posted 05-23-2020 12:05 AM

Ok thanks a lot! I think I learned a lot more. Didn’t really know the difference between these blades.

Okay I think I will pick up
- “Freud 10” x 60T Thin Kerf Fine Finish Crosscut Blade (LU88R010)” for my Miter saw for cross cuts
- “Freud 10” x 30T Industrial Thin Kerf Glue Line Ripping Blade (LM75R010)” for my Table saw for rips

And I will throw away the junk dewat or other blades I have that split everything.,

View 125mph's profile

125mph

8 posts in 6 days


#12 posted 05-23-2020 02:47 AM

Actually I just canceled the Freud 10”x60T and got the “Freud 10” x 80T Thin Kerf Ultimate Plywood & Melamine Blade (LU79R010)” instead. Hope that was a better pick lol.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1053 posts in 458 days


#13 posted 05-23-2020 02:52 AM

And I will throw away the junk dewat or other blades I have that split everything.,

- 125mph

Don’t throw them away.
I save old blades for when I have to fix mistakes I have made, and I may need to cut through staples or nails.
Or just rank materials that you don’t want to mess up fresh good blades.

Besides a good blade, use a zero clearance throat plate when you cut plywood. You should never have to use tape or score it with a knife.
Sometimes you may have to raise the blade 1/16 to score the bottom side first if your still having trouble with splintering or chipping.

-- I only know what I know, nothing less, nothing more -- That doesn't count what I used to know..

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5545 posts in 1305 days


#14 posted 05-23-2020 03:26 AM


And I will throw away the junk dewat or other blades I have that split everything.,

- 125mph

Don t throw them away.
I save old blades for when I have to fix mistakes I have made, and I may need to cut through staples or nails.
Or just rank materials that you don t want to mess up fresh good blades.

Besides a good blade, use a zero clearance throat plate when you cut plywood. You should never have to use tape or score it with a knife.
Sometimes you may have to raise the blade 1/16 to score the bottom side first if your still having trouble with splintering or chipping.

- LeeRoyMan

Good council here. You never know when you need to saw something unsavory, but rest assured you will if you pitch those blades. Plus if you do that, it’s a nice time to be wearing a face shield.

What I will add to the entire conversation, is if you go the path of separate blades for separate types of cuts, make sure that the saw plate itself, but especially the kerf are all very much the same. Plus match that to whatever thickness of splitter/Riving knife you are using. Failing to do this before the cut, can get you into a sticky situation in the middle of the cut.

-- Think safe, be safe

View 125mph's profile

125mph

8 posts in 6 days


#15 posted 05-23-2020 03:56 AM

- LeeRoyMan

Good council here. You never know when you need to saw something unsavory, but rest assured you will if you pitch those blades. Plus if you do that, it s a nice time to be wearing a face shield.

What I will add to the entire conversation, is if you go the path of separate blades for separate types of cuts, make sure that the saw plate itself, but especially the kerf are all very much the same. Plus match that to whatever thickness of splitter/Riving knife you are using. Failing to do this before the cut, can get you into a sticky situation in the middle of the cut.

- therealSteveN

I’m just using a small compact table saw, the DW745.. it has a stock riving knife.. Is that okay with these blades?

Good thing you mentioned this, it looks like the dewalt says dont use any blade with kerf less than .094.

I just swapped the thin glue line thin for “10” Industrial Glue Line Ripping Blade”

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