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Forum topic by recycle1943 posted 05-18-2020 04:16 PM 568 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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recycle1943

4793 posts in 2504 days


05-18-2020 04:16 PM

I’m going to build an outside table and I mean outside in the rain, sun and all that other stuff we get here in NE Ohio. I’ve decided to use some really old super nice aromatic cedar that I found last year.
My problen is “what kind of finish” can I use that will hold up to Ohio weather ?
The table will be about 4’ square and sit on a metal frame that was part of a patio set. I do know the table will be used for cards, wine sipping and just general outside usage. It will have an umbrella type cover that does nothing but sheild some sun from the ‘sippers’ but no protection to the table.

So what do you suggest ? ?

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them


27 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

695 posts in 1501 days


#1 posted 05-18-2020 05:14 PM

Nothing except exterior paint will hold up beyond a year or two (if you’re lucky). I lived near Geneva On the Lake for 17 years , so I know how bad the weather is. Not much need for UV protection as the sun rarely shines, but the snow and rain will not be kind to any finish.

-- Sawdust Maker

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2121 posts in 429 days


#2 posted 05-18-2020 05:30 PM

If you dont want to paint it, then I suggest going boat. Marine spar varnish cut with MS. It will likely fail in spots eventually. Or just oil it and be prepared to oil it every year.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View mitch_56's profile

mitch_56

36 posts in 1355 days


#3 posted 05-18-2020 05:34 PM

The Wood Talk podcast did an episode on this exact topic

You should see if you can hunt it down—turns out there’s kind of a lot to this topic, starting from the design of the table itself, construction considerations, the zillions of options for the finish itself, and setting realistic expectations (meaning: Mother Nature always wins).

I found it very helpful!

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recycle1943

4793 posts in 2504 days


#4 posted 05-18-2020 05:52 PM

@LittleShaver – It won’t see any snow but it will sit out in the rain all summer and paint is totally out of the question
@wildwoodbybrianjohns – OIL ? BLO ?

@mitch_56 – Mother Nature always wins How true – If Brian meant boiled linseed oil that may be my answer

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

3052 posts in 3072 days


#5 posted 05-18-2020 06:42 PM

Dick,

I’m no marine expert, or novice either, but I agree with Brian that if the finish survives on as boat, it should be your to ticket longevity.
Maybe check a few boat supplies shops on the web, or Google marine wooden boat finish.

Good luck,
Tom

Well, I did a quick search, this is what I found:
https://www.marinetalk.com/best-marine-varnishes/

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4793 posts in 2504 days


#6 posted 05-18-2020 06:48 PM

@Oldtool – thanks Tom, I used marine varnish once and it wasn’t a lot of fun but I didn’t reduce it so maybe that is part of my answer. Marine spar varnish cut with MS
btw – what is MS

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2121 posts in 429 days


#7 posted 05-18-2020 07:24 PM

Mineral Spirits, Dick. A good rule of thumb is to cut 75%/25% MS/varnish, first coat. This will allow the mix to really penetrate. It will go on like water, and raise the grain too. 2nd coat, reduce the MS to 50%. 3rd coat, reduce MS again to 25%. Doesnt have to be exact. I would sand before the 3rd coat. Then, you can decide if you want to use a Satin or a Gloss. I assume the gloss is more durable, like on boats. Rainwater will bead off this finish and wont be an issue, for awhile, anyway.

Re: oil:

Linseed oil is AN option, but there are probably better ones for what you want. I just use Linseed oil on everything, but I still follow the cutting with MS as described above. Of course, there are oil blends specifically engineered for outdoor furniture. Ie., tung, teak, L.O., and some kind of UV protector. Rainwater will not bead off this finish, and you MAY get spotting.

There are other things you can cut with, like naptha, etc. There are a couple members here who really know their stuff as far as finishes go; I am sure some of them will chime in sooner or later.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4793 posts in 2504 days


#8 posted 05-18-2020 07:44 PM

@wildwoodbybrianjohns – Thanks Brian, that clears up a lot of my own mis-conceptions. After reading your post I ran into the bathroom and looked at my forehead in the mirror. I could actually see the stupid tattoo dissappearing from my forehead.
I have MS, blo and acetone on hand. I don’t know why I never thought of reducing the varnish enough to penetrate and seal. Might be because I think I remember reading on the can do not reduce and I usually never believe everything I read.
gonna start cutting and planeing cedar tomorrow. I was lucky and found several hundred feet of mostly clear aromatic cedar last year, been waiting for something to do with some of it.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2121 posts in 429 days


#9 posted 05-18-2020 08:10 PM

No acetone! unnecessary. Plus, you may end up with some kind of IED. Dunno?

Do not reduce = less profit.

Good find on the cedar!!!

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

2324 posts in 2831 days


#10 posted 05-18-2020 08:33 PM

Cabott stain is outstanding, but it is a solid stain so it will hide the beautiful ceadar. (it lasts decades)

-- Petey

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2121 posts in 429 days


#11 posted 05-18-2020 09:08 PM



Cabott stain is outstanding, but it is a solid stain so it will hide the beautiful ceadar. (it lasts decades)

- Peteybadboy

I have sprayed gallons of that stuff in a former life. It is good stuff.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1766 posts in 1992 days


#12 posted 05-18-2020 09:39 PM

Hi Dick,
Harsh conditions here in Hong Kong for outdoor furniture, I use this. Ronseal Decking Oil, Unfortunately for you its an English product but it may sell in the US.
Its an oil based decking oil, It smells great with all sorts of natural oils added. I highly recommend it.
I,ll do an internet search and see if it can be sourced i the USA.
Cheers
Anthony

EDIT Sorry , but I would not stain Outdoor furniture Timber, stain for me is a coloring not a protection.

EDIT II I,ve just emailed Ronseal to see if they have a distributor in the USA, Lets see.

-- There is no hope for any of us if we keep apologizing for telling the truth.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4793 posts in 2504 days


#13 posted 05-18-2020 09:41 PM


Cabott stain is outstanding, but it is a solid stain so it will hide the beautiful ceadar. (it lasts decades)

- Peteybadboy

can’t hide the red/white cedar -

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4793 posts in 2504 days


#14 posted 05-18-2020 09:45 PM



Hi Dick,
Harsh conditions here in Hong Kong for outdoor furniture, I use this. Ronseal Decking Oil, Unfortunately for you its an English product but it may sell in the US.
Its an oil based decking oil, It smells great with all sorts of natural oils added. I highly recommend it.
I,ll do an internet search and see if it can be sourced i the USA.
Cheers
Anthony

EDIT Sorry , but I would not stain Outdoor furniture Timber, stain for me is a coloring not a protection.

- anthm27

No, I stained my fence a few years back and it just got ugly. Finally couldn’t stand it and tore it out and replaced it with white vinyl fence

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

25312 posts in 3987 days


#15 posted 05-18-2020 09:48 PM

I’d use teak oil. The natural oils in cedar will eventually lift any varnish/ paint or or top coating. A deck stain might work for a while.
I made an outdoor chase lounge out of cedar and used exterior Poly on it and in less than 3 years it peeled off in sheets

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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