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Forum topic by tntobel posted 05-15-2020 01:09 AM 689 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tntobel

35 posts in 318 days


05-15-2020 01:09 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question turning

Hello all,

I am new to woodturning and I purchased a Delta 46-460 Midi Lathe to start. I am using a piece of pine wood and a carbide-tipped cutter.

I decided to try it out today and I experienced my tool not really cutting the wood, just making it splinter and occasionally stop the wood piece from turning. A picture is shown below. I am wondering why this is happening? Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks!

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica


23 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2276 posts in 3806 days


#1 posted 05-15-2020 02:26 AM

When starting with a square, you will have those conditions. If you can, knock of the corners to make an octagon. It is practice, practice, practice. And maybe try poplar, it has a finer grain than cheap pine. When turning, use a very gentle, careful feed rate. Don’t shove the chisel in too far. As it rounds out, the chips and splinters will go away. And once it does, you will be hooked.

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1327 posts in 916 days


#2 posted 05-15-2020 03:02 AM

You are not clear about what tool you are using. When starting with a square blank, a roughing gouge is the best tool and should be used until the stock is round. The speed of the machine may also be a factor. We usually start with a fairly low rpm and increase it when the work is rounded.

-- Phil Allin - There are woodworkers and people who collect woodworking tools. The woodworkers have a chair to sit on that they made.

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tntobel

35 posts in 318 days


#3 posted 05-15-2020 03:39 AM

I am using carbide tipped tools, and I am using the square with radius tip, as recommended by many on different discussions. I am starting on a pretty low rpm, in the low 1000’s. The wood stops spinning sometimes because my tool gets caught…is this a problem?

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

View tntobel's profile

tntobel

35 posts in 318 days


#4 posted 05-15-2020 03:41 AM



When starting with a square, you will have those conditions. If you can, knock of the corners to make an octagon. It is practice, practice, practice. And maybe try poplar, it has a finer grain than cheap pine. When turning, use a very gentle, careful feed rate. Don t shove the chisel in too far. As it rounds out, the chips and splinters will go away. And once it does, you will be hooked.

- ibewjon

Thanks. I will try to find some cheap poplar nearby and practice knocking off the corners. What rpm do you recommend for rounding?

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8648 posts in 4661 days


#5 posted 05-15-2020 03:48 AM



I am using carbide tipped tools, and I am using the square with radius tip, as recommended by many on different discussions. I am starting on a pretty low rpm, in the low 1000 s. The wood stops spinning sometimes because my tool gets caught…is this a problem?

- tntobel

Looks like this is a small diameter piece and should be turned faster. Low speeds are for large diameter turnings.

As recommended try roughing the piece closer to round (hand plane could do the trick). Another thing that would be a factor is the angle of your cutting tool and the distance of the tool rest. Try placing the tool rest as close to the piece as possible,

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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tntobel

35 posts in 318 days


#6 posted 05-15-2020 04:02 AM


I am using carbide tipped tools, and I am using the square with radius tip, as recommended by many on different discussions. I am starting on a pretty low rpm, in the low 1000 s. The wood stops spinning sometimes because my tool gets caught…is this a problem?

- tntobel

Looks like this is a small diameter piece and should be turned faster. Low speeds are for large diameter turnings.

As recommended try roughing the piece closer to round (hand plane could do the trick). Another thing that would be a factor is the angle of your cutting tool and the distance of the tool rest. Try placing the tool rest as close to the piece as possible,

- PurpLev

Thank you. My tool rest was about 2 inches away from the piece so I will move it closer tomorrow and see how that works. Right now I am holding the tool horizontally, at no angle, because I have seen this in many videos. If you know of an angle that would work better please let me know.

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8427 posts in 3212 days


#7 posted 05-15-2020 04:30 AM

It’s a small piece, so crank up the RPM’s. Move your tool rest as close as you can, and take very light initial passes until it is rounded out. Stopping the piece indicates you are trying to take too much of a bite, combined with too slow turning RPM. Once you get it rounded, then you can be more aggressive with your cuts.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View tntobel's profile

tntobel

35 posts in 318 days


#8 posted 05-15-2020 05:13 AM


It s a small piece, so crank up the RPM s. Move your tool rest as close as you can, and take very light initial passes until it is rounded out. Stopping the piece indicates you are trying to take too much of a bite, combined with too slow turning RPM. Once you get it rounded, then you can be more aggressive with your cuts.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Thanks Brad, I appreciate your wise advice. At what rpm would you suggest for this project, and how close should the tool rest be to the piece? 1/2” ? 1/8”?

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

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MrUnix

8427 posts in 3212 days


#9 posted 05-15-2020 07:36 AM

Thanks Brad, I appreciate your wise advice. At what rpm would you suggest for this project, and how close should the tool rest be to the piece? 1/2” ? 1/8”?
- tntobel

Generally you want to go as fast as you can without the piece causing excessive vibration. More critical when doing large diameter out of balance stuff where excessive speed can be dangerous. For spindle work, you can pretty much start a lot faster as vibration is usually not much of an issue. As an example, today I turned a Red Oak handle for one of my homemade turning tools. The blank started out at approx. 1.5” square and about 15” long. I both roughed and finish turned it at about as fast as my PM45 would go, which was probably somewhere around 2500-2600 rpm.

For the tool rest, you want it as close as you can without hitting the wood and where you feel comfortable with. A lot of times that is difficult to achieve, depending on shape – which may require you to reposition the rest for different sections. I try to keep it around 1/8” give or take. Keep in mind that the closer your tool rest is to the wood, the more steady your tool is when cutting. Too far away and you will beat yourself up trying to hold the tool.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5940 posts in 4676 days


#10 posted 05-15-2020 12:21 PM

Remove the faceplate. You don’t use a faceplate for spindle turning.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2740 posts in 3002 days


#11 posted 05-15-2020 12:22 PM

Almost all carbide tools are scrapers (can ride the bevel with cupped cutters), and should be held parallel to slightly nose down. As stated by others, more speed (2000 + for <2”) and tool rest closer, although the screw hole on the bottom of your carbide tool needs to extend off the tool rest.

Look up robo hippy on utube for more scraper advice. My advice is to learn to use hss tools. Carbide scraping tools teach very little that translates to using conventional tools. I do use carbide for hollowing.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1768 posts in 2743 days


#12 posted 05-15-2020 01:12 PM

Since you’re using the square with the slight radius, angle your tool in a manner that you are cutting from one of the points. If you are going straight in with the whole width of the cutter, that will stop your piece from rotating.

When the piece stops rotating from a catch, are you tightening it with the tail stock hand wheel??........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Davevand's profile

Davevand

246 posts in 1849 days


#13 posted 05-15-2020 05:01 PM

I use my circle carbide cutter for rough turning, seems to work better than the others. Also pine does not turn very well, it is too soft to use with carbide, HHS would be a much better choice with pine.

View tntobel's profile

tntobel

35 posts in 318 days


#14 posted 05-15-2020 05:04 PM


I use my circle carbide cutter for rough turning, seems to work better than the others. Also pine does not turn very well, it is too soft to use with carbide, HHS would be a much better choice with pine.

- Davevand

Thanks Dave. Ibewjon recommended poplar so I will try that out. Any other wood you would recommend to practice turning with carbide?

-- Theo Tobel, Santa Monica

View GlennM's profile

GlennM

28 posts in 3290 days


#15 posted 05-15-2020 05:47 PM

Your tool rest seems quite high. Is your tool cutting at the centreline of your work piece?

-- Glenn, Nova Scotia

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