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Forum topic by drantion posted 05-14-2020 12:29 AM 805 views 1 time favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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drantion

10 posts in 258 days


05-14-2020 12:29 AM

Hello everyone!

Hello, I am a new woodworker and have designed a pillow storage/bench in sketchup based on a youtube video I saw. I designed it to fit my space, and I would like some feedback on the design before I build it. I had to customize from the video, so I’m not sure if I should still use 2×4’s, or if there are any obvious improvements I could make.

Basically, any and all feedback on the design on the would be very helpful as its my first “custom” design and only my third wood working project.

Any advice on how to properly get advice from the community would be greatly appreciated!

This is a link to the .skp file for my project: https://www.dropbox.com/s/hti1ht5pyaasc5x/bench-custom.skp?dl=0

Thank you!

EDIT:

Ive created some dimensions here:


28 replies so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

6398 posts in 1565 days


#1 posted 05-14-2020 01:02 AM

I don’t really want to open random SketchUp files. It would be better if you did some screen grabs of your design in SketchUp on your computer and posted those images instead. Besides, not everyone on here uses SketchUp so you’ll get more feedback that way as well.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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LittleBlackDuck

6205 posts in 1796 days


#2 posted 05-14-2020 01:57 AM

The SketchUp model doesn’t reveal much of your intentions…

Nevertheless, depending on the intention, that heavy frame seems like an overkill…

With goon mortice and tennon joins with good glue joins, the “skin” would probably be sufficient. I’d up the “trim” and back to 19mm, and the panels could be 1/4 ply (for cosmetics).

Good luck.

PS. Just an aside SketchUp hint… use of layers and scenes would help in understanding the model better. Pink? Even rosewood is that colour… don’t take me seriously her, just being a smart rrrs…
Looks like you had a “ball” in the design… components #1 to

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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drantion

10 posts in 258 days


#3 posted 05-14-2020 02:08 AM

The SketchUp model doesn t reveal much of your intentions…

I was trying to replicate this project: https://www.paultrandiy.com/kitchen-nook-storage-bench-diy/
just with the measurements of my space.

Nevertheless, depending on the intention, that heavy frame seems like an overkill…

I agree – those 2×4s look way to beefy for such a small thing.

With goon mortice and tennon joins with good glue joins, the “skin” would probably be sufficient. I d up the “trim” and back to 19mm, and the panels could be 1/4 ply (for cosmetics).

I’ve never done mortice and tennon joints! What do you mean by “skin”? Just the 0.75 inch plywood?

PS. Just an aside SketchUp hint… use of layers and scenes would help in understanding the model better. Pink? Even rosewood is that colour… don t take me seriously her, just being a smart rrrs…
Looks like you had a “ball” in the design… components #1 to

Sorry! This was my first design in Sketchup. I formed groups in my “outliner” for the lid, trim, and panels. Is that not what you mean? Also the color was I guess semi-randomly chosen by the “OpenCutList” extension I was playing around with to help me generate a cutlist for the plywood.

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LittleBlackDuck

6205 posts in 1796 days


#4 posted 05-14-2020 04:41 AM

Hey dr no offence meant and as for the first attemp at SU… bloody good job… and the pink reference was me being a not-so smart arse.

Sorry, my bad… wrong use of “skin”... I was referring to the “trim”... if you upped the timber to 3/4” (19mm in real world terms) you should get away with mortice and tennon (M&T) joins… I just tossed M&T in as one option…
With 19mm timber as alternatives to “traditional M&T joins, you could use biscuits, dowels, pocket holes and depending on your financial status a Fe$tool Domino… deliberate use of the $ when referring to Fe$tool as they are not the cheapest option, however, they (the Domino) are/is well worth the shekels if you want to get serious and will be building lots of cabinet type of furniture (boxes, tables, stools inclusive) in the future… If you are new to woodworking, M&T is probably throwing you in at the deep end (with a lead belt, no flippers or a wet suit)... They are easy in SketchUp which is little help other than it can give you the theory and measurements at least. Before SketchUp I always used to forget to allow for the tennons on either end.

Had a quick look at the video… bear in mind that guy was making a sit on “bench” that has the capacity of a few people so it would require that chunky frame (or at lease some sort of chunky frame)... But for storage and minimal weight bearing, 19mm lumber should suffice… having said that I wouldn’t practice my dance moves on top of it.

Those pictures and dimensions that you provided is exactly what I believe Rich was eluding to… Now he may probably give you better advice in construction material than me… I’m just a pretty face that knows SketchUp.

PS. Good comeback on your addition to the blog body. There are members here older than Moses that still don’t know how to… or too pig headed to!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View DS's profile

DS

3621 posts in 3396 days


#5 posted 05-14-2020 12:08 PM

Okay, I will weigh in here.
I see a lot of comments about sketch up and not so much about your pillow box design.

To start, this is a box for pillows, not a box to support a second floor addition on your house.
The 2×4s can just go away. They are a waste of space here.

Also, your front face with two panels, build it with long rails and a short center stile.

Your lid, I would make a single piece top that hinges at the back and use toy box style flap stays to hold it open.
The inset top is good if you are building this to install in a niche tight to the walls. It is a lot more unnecessary work.

Consider lining the inside with raw cedar. It will deter bugs from making a home in your pillows.

My 2 cents… (or 3c)

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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drantion

10 posts in 258 days


#6 posted 05-14-2020 04:08 PM

The 2×4s can just go away. They are a waste of space here.

I think I might want to occasionally sit on it. Do you think just 0.75’’ plywood without an internal frame will be strong enough for that? I was thinking the 2×4s are overkill, but maybe I can just reduce it to 2×2 or something like that? What do you think?

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drantion

10 posts in 258 days


#7 posted 05-14-2020 05:55 PM

Thanks for your reply! @LittleBlackDuck!

But for storage and minimal weight bearing, 19mm lumber should suffice… having said that I wouldn’t practice my dance moves on top of it.

I am thinking of occasionally being able to sit on it to put on shoes, etc. Do you think the .75’’ plywood box be enough for that? I have a Kreg pocket hole jig I could use to make it.

If I wanted a frame, just for Security™, should I use smaller lumber than 2×4? Thanks!

View DS's profile

DS

3621 posts in 3396 days


#8 posted 05-14-2020 08:28 PM

A properly constructed frame and panel box will support a lot of weight.
If your are unsure, then add a center partition of plywood to help out.

We set 450 lb ovens on about this much support all the time without issue. (Granted, that is more of a static load than a dynamic load, but still)

I recently did a restoration on a water damaged blanket chest circa 1945. It was very simply constructed and considered the state of the art in its day.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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drantion

10 posts in 258 days


#9 posted 05-14-2020 09:41 PM

@DS

A properly constructed frame and panel box will support a lot of weight.

What do you mean by frame and panel box? I thought you were suggesting to get rid of the 2×4 frame, and instead just use plywood to make a box.

View DS's profile

DS

3621 posts in 3396 days


#10 posted 05-14-2020 09:51 PM

Your mortise and tenon frames is a construction known as “frame and panel”.
It is the old school way of constructing large panels from solid wood, before plywood became a thing.

Wood movement will destroy a solid wood panel and F&P gets around this problem.
(And then there is plywood which has virtually zero movement to give us a modern solution to the problem)

What I meant was, a box constructed with frame and panel faces is fairly strong and will support a lot of weight.

BTW. I have a Kreg jig, but use it only as a last resort type of thing, I have a doweling jig that gets lots of use in my home shop. Others use the mortise and tenon like was shown earlier. A cope and stick router bit set will do fairly well also.
There are lots of ways to make your “frame and panel” sides. Ranked from best to worst, though, kreg jig ranks really, really low on my list.
< end of PSA r.e kreg jig >

Welcome to Lumberjocks

p.S. and yes, get rid of the 2×4s. The real frame is the pretty one on the outside.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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drantion

10 posts in 258 days


#11 posted 05-14-2020 10:00 PM

Thanks DS! I unfortunately don’t know how to make a mortise and tenon connection, let alone in plywood. If I made this project without a 2×4 frame, right now my only option is to use my kreg jig.

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DS

3621 posts in 3396 days


#12 posted 05-14-2020 10:23 PM

What tools do you have? A router? A tablesaw? There are a lot, and I mean a lot, of options to build this pillow chest.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1489 posts in 702 days


#13 posted 05-14-2020 10:59 PM

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drantion

10 posts in 258 days


#14 posted 05-14-2020 11:14 PM

@DS

What tools do you have? A router? A tablesaw? There are a lot, and I mean a lot, of options to build this pillow chest.

I have a miter saw, and I have just bought a contractors table saw though havent used it yet (I’ve watched and am still watching a bunch of technique and safety videos).

@LeeRoyMan

That looks great! Hm. What are those joints called? I’m going to have to look up how to make them.

View DS's profile

DS

3621 posts in 3396 days


#15 posted 05-15-2020 01:19 AM

LRM is showing a type of mortise and tenon joint made either on a tablesaw with a jig, or, with a cope and stick router set.
The flat panel floats loose in the groove so the inevitable movement won’t crack the panel.

The joint on the corners is a miter joint and can be made on the tablesaw or with a router.

There is a faction, for a lack of a better word, of folks here on LJs who are hand tool aficionados who would claim the only correct way to make this joinery is with a series of specialized hand planes.

If you are “super old school” and are doing woodworking to pass time in an interesting way, then this could be your cup of tea.

For me personally, I do this type of stuff for a living and efficiency is at the top of my list of priorities, mostly because it equates to more profit at the end of a project.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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