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Forum topic by sawdust99 posted 05-11-2020 07:30 PM 776 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sawdust99

31 posts in 3696 days


05-11-2020 07:30 PM

Looking to buy a good resaw blade for my bandsaw. I have a 14” Jet bandsaw. I don’t know which way to go carbide tip or or regular blade. Thanks for any help.

Bob


43 replies so far

View Thorbjorn88's profile

Thorbjorn88

146 posts in 947 days


#1 posted 05-11-2020 07:53 PM

This is a great resaw blade in any length you want. A 14” saw I’d get the 1/2” thick version. I’ve never used a carbide tipped blade but if you don’t resaw a lot high silica wood this will last a while. I’ve seen a lot of people use different jigs with a dremel and a grinding wheel to quickly sharpen non-carbide blades but haven’t tried it myself.

https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodslicer-resaw-bandsaw-blades.aspx

-- Dave

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

14503 posts in 1943 days


#2 posted 05-11-2020 07:57 PM

+1 ^

Woodslicer gives a fantastic cut and finish. But it’s not a blade for high volume either so it won’t last long if you’re doing a whole lot of resawing. Carbide would be preferred in that case.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View them700project's profile

them700project

245 posts in 1823 days


#3 posted 05-11-2020 07:57 PM

I just picked up resaw king.It is pretty impressive. and if you get it on sale not too ridiculous. goes on sale at woodcraft every other month or so

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PBWilson1970

98 posts in 198 days


#4 posted 05-11-2020 08:04 PM



+1 ^

Woodslicer gives a fantastic cut and finish. But it s not a blade for high volume either so it won t last long if you re doing a whole lot of resawing. Carbide would be preferred in that case.

- HokieKen

I agree 100%.

-- I love the smell of sawdust in the morning.

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4287 posts in 3756 days


#5 posted 05-11-2020 08:08 PM

The Woodslicer is a great blade (and Highland Hardware is my local woodworking shop), but I’ve also had good luck with Timber Wolf blades, so you may want to check them out too.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

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Woodmaster1

1500 posts in 3392 days


#6 posted 05-11-2020 09:35 PM

Woodslicer blades are great. I had little extra money so I bought a carbide tip blade from Highland Hardware it’s fantastic . I may not have to replace for a longtime. If I factor the cost of the woodslicer I just need it to outlast five woodslicer blades which I think it will do. It already has lasted longer than three woodslicer blades have and it’s still cutting great.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2842 posts in 3726 days


#7 posted 05-11-2020 09:39 PM

I used to use, Woodslicer blades but they dull quickly! For about the same cost “Supercut” carbide impregnated blades last many times longer.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

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CaptainKlutz

3350 posts in 2299 days


#8 posted 05-11-2020 11:07 PM

IMHO – the wood being cut and your volume of lumber defines the best blade to use.

- High volume anything: +1 carbide.
Do you really want to change 4-5 blades, when one will do the job?

- Woods containing silica like; Philippine Mahogany, red cedar, Rosewood’s, and/or many of the hard exotics; need a carbide tipped blade, or Bi-metal blade.

- If you change blade size/type often; regular blades are better. IME – Carbide teeth damage just as easy as regular teeth when you changing blades and you tend to Klutz something. Nothing worse than knocking off tooth of $190 band saw blade.

- If you only split open the occasional difficult board and rest of time run softer domestic wood; using a regular blade is more affordable solution.

+1 Woodslicer gets dull quick. Bought two Woodslicer blades, didn’t like them?
The sharp/dull -ness of blade felt like a light switch. Cuts amazing fast for short while, and then many times slower in an instant; often in middle of cut for no obvious reason?

I prefer the TimberWolf 2-3VPC blades for re-saw. They get dull with a more linear curve? Often don’t know the blade needs replaced, until you grab something hard like white oak and it cuts super slow. Even dull the Timberwolf 2-3VPC will slice through soft domestic wood. Granted I tend to use by blades longer than I should, but I can use a Timerwolf 2-3VPC blade for 2-3x as long the wood slicer lasted me. Combined with fact that Timberwolf is cheaper than Woodslicer, there is no decision to make. Timberwolf is a better choice for my needs.

Local shop suggested a Lenox bi-metal blade for exotic woods as trade off against carbide. Used it on some African Mahogany and so far it appears to last about twice as long as my regular blades. Since they cost almost 2x regular blade, the only advantage is reduced number of blade changes, so far?

YMMV

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View Rich's profile

Rich

5689 posts in 1394 days


#9 posted 05-12-2020 04:12 AM

Laguna ReSaw King. It’s $150, but worth every penny. It can be resharpened about four times at roughly $40 a pop, so that mitigates the entry price over time.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

135 posts in 1924 days


#10 posted 05-12-2020 10:55 AM

I wouldn’t even consider the ReSaw King blade for your Jet 14” saw. It is a 14” cast iron saw right? If so it won’t tension it properly. I ran some of the thin 3/4” blades (0.022” I think) and they weren’t really ideal. The King is thicker and doubt it would come close to tensioning properly. Better to run no wider than 1/2” in blades in this saw.

After trying a variety of blades I ultimately decided that running moderately priced or even inexpensive (of a decent brand) blades and changing often wasn’t terrible strategy.

I was in love with timberwolf blade, but decided I was won over by how nice they cut when new and decided that the newness wore off really quickly and they were mediocre very quickly. The blades from Highland are nice. That said I had decent luck with low and medium priced blades with the Olson label if changed a bit more often. I try to plan to cut veneers in really nice wood and other critical cuts when I have a fresh blade.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5932 posts in 1379 days


#11 posted 05-12-2020 11:53 AM


Better to run no wider than 1/2” in blades in this saw.
- PeteStaehling

Sage advice. The Delta clone saws won’t tension blades wider than 1/2” worth a hoot. But on the other hand a blade to do resawing is usually described as one which is wider, and has some backbone to it. IOW a heavier blade than the Delta clones can work with, without issues.

I’ve been getting the Starrett brand blades that they sell at WoodCraft with good results lately. Decent welds, and a very low price. They are HSS, so the lifetime is shorter than carbide for certain, but even with carbide teeth, there isn’t a guarantee the blade will last a long time. On your saw the amount you need to tension the blade to get good cuts will also cause band breakage. I’m was always more comfortable getting really nice cuts even if only for a shorter time when I was using a delta clone to resaw with.

To tell the truth the best blade to resaw with IF you resaw a lot is one that isn’t on a delta clone bandsaw. The old cast iron framed bandsaws just have a hard time getting to the correct tension needed for a good resaw. The newer steel framed saws can get there, and hold it easily. Easily 90+ % of the question to do with resawing are from owners of cast iron, Delta clone bandsaws. Folks with steel framed saws just don’t find a difficulty.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Rich's profile

Rich

5689 posts in 1394 days


#12 posted 05-12-2020 03:14 PM


I wouldn t even consider the ReSaw King blade for your Jet 14” saw. It is a 14” cast iron saw right? If so it won t tension it properly. I ran some of the thin 3/4” blades (0.022” I think) and they weren t really ideal. The King is thicker and doubt it would come close to tensioning properly. Better to run no wider than 1/2” in blades in this saw.

- PeteStaehling

You’re entitled to your opinion, but the facts indicate otherwise. I resaw mesquite, maple, walnut and others on my Rikon 10-326 with the 3/4” Laguna ReSaw King and it performs flawlessly. The Jet is just as capable of a saw, so if my saw can do it, so can the OP’s. I also keep a Timber Wolf 3/4×2-3tpi VPC for certain situations and a Starrett Advanz TS 3/4” 3tpi for others. They are all outstanding performers.

Regarding thickness, I just measured the Laguna and the Timber Wolf at 0.025”. The Starrett is a significantly thicker 0.035” and still performs flawlessly on my saw. No problems with tension whatsoever.

The OP asked about a blade for his 14” Jet. I don’t know what purpose rambling about Delta clones serves, but it has no bearing on the OP’s situation. Making up things about tensioning without knowing the facts doesn’t help either.

P.S. I have never broken a carbide tooth when changing blades. My post #9 pretty much says it all. The Laguna will outlast several regular blades, and when you combine that with the fact that it can be resharpened several times at a fraction of the cost of a new blade, it’s actually one of the least expensive options over time.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Foghorn

528 posts in 191 days


#13 posted 05-12-2020 06:26 PM

I agree with CaptainKlutz. I have been using the Viking (Timberwolf) 1/2” 3 TPI for a long time on a 17” saw. They work great for the resaw work I do which is usually 8” or 9” tall and 24” long slices for guitar building.

I don’t do production work so not sure how long they would last for that, but they certainly are a lot better than the Olson blades and the woodslicer that I tried a few years back.

-- Darrel

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5932 posts in 1379 days


#14 posted 05-12-2020 09:18 PM

Earth to Rich, earth to Rich….. The OP doesn’t have a steel frame BS, he has a Delta clone cast iron BS, and he will not have success with that blade. Different saw types have different needs when it comes to blades.

Notice everyone else talking about a 1/2” 3 TPI blade. Your Resaw King doesn’t have a fit for that blade. Maybe you ought to call Torben and tell him to get his shirt together.

Searching for resaw king on the Laguna site for a 93” 1/2” x 3 TPI gets you this.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Rich's profile

Rich

5689 posts in 1394 days


#15 posted 05-12-2020 09:45 PM


Earth to Rich, earth to Rich….. The OP doesn t have a steel frame BS, he has a Delta clone cast iron BS, and he will not have success with that blade. Different saw types have different needs when it comes to blades.

- therealSteveN

Well, you are one witty little guy.

The opening post says “Looking to buy a good resaw blade for my bandsaw. I have a 14” Jet bandsaw. I don’t know which way to go carbide tip or or regular blade. Thanks for any help.”

Where are you getting Delta clone from 14” Jet? Do a search on the page and you’ll find that no one had mentioned Delta clone until you did right out of thin air.


Notice everyone else talking about a 1/2” 3 TPI blade. Your Resaw King doesn t have a fit for that blade. Maybe you ought to call Torben and tell him to get his shirt together.

Searching for resaw king on the Laguna site for a 93” 1/2” x 3 TPI gets you this.
- therealSteveN

You’ll have to explain this one to me. Where are you getting 3 tpi? The ReSaw King does not come in 3 tpi. In fact, most woodworkers would know that a good resaw blade does not have a constant pitch of any amount, but rather the pitch is variable to reduce harmonics.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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