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Delta 36-725 Table Saw Motor Died!

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Forum topic by DannyW posted 05-04-2020 08:49 PM 499 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DannyW

284 posts in 653 days


05-04-2020 08:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

I was cutting box joints with a dado set and the motor bogged down (I guess I was going too fast) and then it just stopped completely. The switch now doesn’t do anything at all (no sound or humming). I checked the extension cord and it seems to work with a trim router. I found the little red reset button on the bottom of the motor housing but it doesn’t seem to do anything (it doesn’t depress very far). Any other ideas? I haven’t taken the switch apart too see if maybe it is burned. I have only had it maybe a year and have only used it sparingly.

-- DannyW


15 replies so far

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1044 posts in 2505 days


#1 posted 05-04-2020 09:14 PM

Did you let it cool off before pushing the thermal reset button? It does not move far and the reset is not much of a click but might need a firm hand. If you burned up the motor, you would probably smell it.

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MrUnix

8216 posts in 3055 days


#2 posted 05-04-2020 09:15 PM

Normal troubleshooting – check power at the outlet, then at the switch (input and output), then power at the motor. Be careful and don’t shock yourself. If you have power to the motor, then it’s something with the motor itself. First thing I’d do would be to test the capacitors (IIRC, there is both a start and run capacitor in there) – all you need is a simple multimeter in resistance mode. Report back what you find.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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DannyW

284 posts in 653 days


#3 posted 05-04-2020 09:21 PM

Yes it has been cooling for over a day already. Pressing the reset button seems mushy with no positive tactile feel. I guess I will pull the switch apart and see if it is getting power, and then check the motor.

-- DannyW

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5826 posts in 2243 days


#4 posted 05-04-2020 10:28 PM

I have had the thermal breaker (the reset switch) fail after being tripped by bogging down the saw before (not this model though). I seem to remember that pushing the failed one was sort of squishy like you described. It is possible that you need to replace it .

Did you make sure that breaker in the panel didn’t trip? Bogging down a saw can cause it to overload and trip. Make sure that you have power to the outlet before you do anything else. You say that you checked out the extension cord but you didn’t say if it was plugged into the same outlet. Also make sure that your GFCI didn’t trip either. I had a GFCI melt down once. I am lucky I noticed the burning smell or it could have burned the house down

BTW, using too long or too small a gauge extension cord can cause problems such as tripping a breaker or at least contribute to it when you push a motor too hard. What gauge or amp rating is your cord and how long?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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DannyW

284 posts in 653 days


#5 posted 05-04-2020 10:50 PM

Problem solved (duh!). Dumb me had not pressed the reset button hard enough. Tried again pushing hard and it clicked. Great to know that it is there and how to use it, even if it does make me feel like an idiot. Back to work now.

P,S. Cutting the box joint fingers was a little scary on the table saw. It is difficult to firmly hold the piece down and against the jig while taking 1/2””w x 3/4” notches. This is my first time to try box joints. Any hints on how to safely cut them?

-- DannyW

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Foghorn

557 posts in 242 days


#6 posted 05-05-2020 01:17 AM



Problem solved (duh!). Dumb me had not pressed the reset button hard enough. Tried again pushing hard and it clicked. Great to know that it is there and how to use it, even if it does make me feel like an idiot. Back to work now.

P,S. Cutting the box joint fingers was a little scary on the table saw. It is difficult to firmly hold the piece down and against the jig while taking 1/2””w x 3/4” notches. This is my first time to try box joints. Any hints on how to safely cut them?

- DannyW


Need more information. What size pieces are you working with?

-- Darrel

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Lazyman

5826 posts in 2243 days


#7 posted 05-05-2020 02:31 AM

If you are cutting box joints on fairly long pieces, that can be a little dicey. A taller backstop and clamps can take some of the scariness out of it. It will make it take longer releasing and resetting the clamp between each cut but will definitely feel more secure.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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DannyW

284 posts in 653 days


#8 posted 05-05-2020 02:34 AM

Right now I am working with some scrap 1×6 red oak cut about 6” long just for practice. The final box that I have in mind will be made from 1×6 (or maybe 1×8) red oak about 16” front/rear and 10” sides. Maybe 1/2” instead of 3/4” would be easier to cut.

-- DannyW

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1644 posts in 1444 days


#9 posted 05-05-2020 02:49 AM

Use a vertical sled and clamp to that. You can gang cut with a little practice. Slow feed is the order of the day since taking two passes is not really a viable option.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1044 posts in 2505 days


#10 posted 05-05-2020 09:53 AM

Clamp to the jig. Quality of the blade matters and as you are removing a lot of wood, go slow.

Yea, a lot of videos show people holding things with their fingers within inches of the blade. Even older instruction books. I try to stay at least 6 inches away.

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DannyW

284 posts in 653 days


#11 posted 05-05-2020 03:16 PM

Yes thanks I need to make a new jig that is taller (more vertical). The cuts are removing so much material that a better jig and going slowly are the only solution and should help a lot.

-- DannyW

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Madmark2

1644 posts in 1444 days


#12 posted 05-05-2020 03:33 PM

As an aside to everyone:

What type of blade should be used to make end grain cuts? It’s not a crosscut, nor is it a rip. Is there a specific cutter that should be used for end grain? Is a dado cutter the best tool for this cut?

Same question for routing. When I router cut finger joints the “sawdust” is all stringy and threads. Is there a better cutter to use? I’ve used both straight and angled cutters with similar results.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

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JohnDon

134 posts in 2025 days


#13 posted 05-05-2020 03:55 PM

With a saw the blade-grain orientation is the same as a rip cut- just on end. I really like my Freud box cutter set (SBOX08)- really smooth cuts. A router bit makes a combination of cut types: cross cut where the leading edge of the bit enters the board, and rip along the sides of the cut; no idea what’s best.

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Madmark2

1644 posts in 1444 days


#14 posted 05-05-2020 04:05 PM

It’s only sorta a rip. The grain doesn’t clear the same way. Look at the sawdust produced by each and see.

Crosscut dust is about as long as it is wide. Rip cuts are short strings but end cuts are long strings. Should there be different gullets?

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5826 posts in 2243 days


#15 posted 05-05-2020 04:15 PM

I use a spiral upcut bit when routing finger joints. It tends to leave fewer fuzzies IME though the type of wood makes a huge difference. I’ve not had great luck trying to cut FJ in plywood for example but it can be done with the right technique and patience. I prefer to cut them with a bit that is smaller than the finger width with a jig similar to the ones often used for dovetails because it allows you to make a light cut that helps to prevent the fuzzies and chipout.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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