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Forum topic by Nirav posted 05-03-2020 01:30 AM 734 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nirav

8 posts in 309 days


05-03-2020 01:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: joinery skill tool question trick tip jig

Hi all,
I’m looking to make a wood wall as a feature in my office. The idea is to have 3/4” x 3/4” white oak strips, oriented vertically, floor to ceiling (9 ft), with 1/2” gap between each strip.
I’d rather not try to rip 9ft long strips, I just don’t think i will be able to do it accurately. Thinking it would be easier to work with shorter strips that can then be joined end to end to create 9ft long strips. Best advice on how to do this? What kind of joints?


27 replies so far

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1313 posts in 2118 days


#1 posted 05-03-2020 03:19 AM

You don’t say what tools you have to work with. If you have a table saw or band saw, you should have no problem ripping 9’ strips. Even with a circular saw (skill saw), using a long straight edge guide strip, it should be doable.
If you are convinced that you can’t do it, the most aesthetically pleasing way to join the shorter pieces would be a simple scarf joint. I assume the strips will be glued to the wall. If so, a simple butt joint would also work but, would not look as good.

View Nirav's profile

Nirav

8 posts in 309 days


#2 posted 05-03-2020 03:26 AM

Sorry, my fault. I have a table saw, band saw, circular saw, jig saw. I just don’t have a great outfeed for the table saw. I thought about the track saw, but obviously don’t have a 9ft track. How do you control the 9 ft long board on the table saw to get a consistent width? How do you prevent it from wandering away from the fence as you feed such a long board? Is there a particular way to set it up?

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2866 posts in 1178 days


#3 posted 05-03-2020 12:00 PM

how wide is the wall ?
what kind of table saw ?
if it is lightweight, like a contractor’s saw, it must be secured
somehow to prevent it from moving.

get 2 helpers to help you with the project.
it can be done safely and efficiently with two extra people.
that is a LOT of cutting for just one person.
finger boards and push sticks would be required.
make sure your riving knife/splitter is set up correctly.

as a side note: I hope you understand the complexities of wood movement.
after you get all those strips cut, it is a very huge possibility that when they
lay around for a period of time, they may start to wiggle, warp, twist, wrack,
and get ugly. and installing them on drywall without support will be the next hurdle.
you might want to cut a few test strips first – before tackling the whole job at one time.

.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View MPython's profile

MPython

338 posts in 828 days


#4 posted 05-03-2020 12:13 PM

Finger joints on a router table is probably the neatest and strongest way to join boards end-to-end. https://www.amazon.com/FINGER-JOINT-BIT/dp/B001DT4S8C

For accurate ripping of long boards on the table saw, use feather boards to keep the work pressed against the fence as it begins the cut. There are many different ways to rig a feather board. My wife gave me a set of these magnetic ones for Christmas last year and I’ve found them to be the easiest to set than anything I”ve used so far.
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/magswitch-universal-magnetic-featherboard#

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Nirav

8 posts in 309 days


#5 posted 05-03-2020 01:19 PM

The wall is a little less than 8 ft wide.
The table saw is a Sawstop professional cabinet saw.
I plan to put up sheets of veneered plywood on the drywall first, then pin the strips to the plywood.
I don’t have helpers unfortunately, at least none that I could ask to help for the duration of this project. I’m just a hobbyist hoping to do this project.
I’ve thought about movement of the wood after I cut the strips, and haven’t come up with a good solution. I figured pinning them to the plywood would stabilize them, but it would be several days before i get them from garage to my office (off-site).

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1485 posts in 2665 days


#6 posted 05-03-2020 01:39 PM

Ripping on a PCS should be no problem, but
First, is the wall design such that you can hide the joints? If so, just butt them. Sure router finger cuts are fine, but that ignores a couple thousand years of miters, scarfs, buts, birds beaks, etc. Any of them if cut well and glued ahead of time should remain tight, though will always be visible.

View Nirav's profile

Nirav

8 posts in 309 days


#7 posted 05-03-2020 01:51 PM

No way to hide a joint, the whole wall will be exposed. I’m ok with a visible joint if it’s the most reliable way to do this project though

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8998 posts in 3592 days


#8 posted 05-03-2020 01:51 PM

Japanese joinery would be a nice feature in your office. Maybe something like this:

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Japanese+joinery&t=h_&iax=images&ia=images

Just something to think about.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2281 posts in 3809 days


#9 posted 05-03-2020 01:57 PM

If you start with boards longer than you need, cut them in half. Work from the same side of each shorter piece and put match marks on the ends for later grain match. That will help hide the type of joint you choose.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1432 posts in 4098 days


#10 posted 05-03-2020 02:14 PM



The table saw is a Sawstop professional cabinet saw.

No reason at all you shouldn’t just build a decent out feed table. It would be FAR quicker than dicking around trying to figure out how to join shorter pieces and then executing.

I plan to put up sheets of veneered plywood on the drywall first, then pin the strips to the plywood.


Good plan.

I’ve thought about movement of the wood after I cut the strips, and haven’t come up with a good solution. I figured pinning them to the plywood would stabilize them,
- Nirav

No question the wood will move as you cut. How much depends on both the grain and quality of the lumber.
Layout the wall correctly and accurately so you don’t end up with an uneven space or a half piece at finish.
Take extra care on the first piece and make sure it’s attached DEAD PLUMB and STRAIGHT. After that use appropriate sized spacer blocks to space and hold the next piece in place. Keep checking plumb visually and with a level. You may have to make minor corrections every 10-12 pieces depending how accurately you proceed.
As for attachment, a SMALL dab of glue every 14-16” should be plenty to hold the pieces in place permanently. Pins to hold while the glue dries.
Don’t over complicate this…it isn’t a difficult project if you take your time and think through it.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View jkm312's profile

jkm312

77 posts in 418 days


#11 posted 05-03-2020 02:15 PM

If it were me, I would consider using splines as a way to hold the end joints together. Before you rip your white oak down cut the slots in the end with a router and a slot bit. It will most likely tear out a little on the exit, but you can trim that away when you rip them down. This method will require you to figure out your finished lengths in advance. At .75 x .75 I don’t think the strips will stay straight for long. They should not be too much of a problem to line up when you put them on the wall. You will need to mill the spline material to fit the slot. Mill them a little loose, because the glue will swell the joint.

Have you considered making your strips wider and using a difference spacing for balance.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3715 posts in 4453 days


#12 posted 05-03-2020 02:42 PM



Sorry, my fault. I have a table saw, band saw, circular saw, jig saw. I just don’t have a great outfeed for the table saw. I thought about the track saw, but obviously don’t have a 9ft track. How do you control the 9 ft long board on the table saw to get a consistent width? How do you prevent it from wandering away from the fence as you feed such a long board? Is there a particular way to set it up?

- Nirav

Maybe I’m missing something but for a 9’ length of wood I don’t see this as an issue.

Build some kind of temporary outfeed supports for the table saw. Maybe even a couple of saw horses with blocks of wood elevating a 2×6 on top of them.

To keep the wood against the fence just clamp a block of wood on the out feed end of the saw table to sandwich the wood you’re cutting between it and the fence. Leave a slight, very slight gap so that it moves through easily without friction.

To me this is a fairly simple solution instead of mortised joints and such. Then again, maybe I’ve missed the point and this isn’t a solution.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1557 posts in 742 days


#13 posted 05-03-2020 02:46 PM


get 2 helpers to help you with the project.
it can be done safely and efficiently with two extra people.

- John Smith

John, can you expand on this.
I’ve never been comfortable with 3 people cutting strips on the table saw, sounds like an accident.
.
.
I agree with Tony_S, cut full lengths. 9’ isn’t that long or hard.

Another option that might be easier for you would be to cut your plywood into 2 foot sections and attach your strips to the plywood first, then put them up on the wall. That way your working on a table instead of the wall.
With some planning you should be able to make it so your strips cover the plywood edges.
If you wanted to get crazy, you could dado your plywood for the strips.

View Nirav's profile

Nirav

8 posts in 309 days


#14 posted 05-03-2020 03:50 PM

Thanks for all the advice! I think I’ll give it a go with full length strips, rather than messing with end joinery. First, build some proper outfeed as suggested. Rip the full 9ft length, with infeed featherboards, and perhaps a loose block at outfeed, as suggested, to minimize lateral movement (should I be worried about kickback??).

Perhaps change the dimensions of the strips as suggested as well. Maybe 1” wide by 3/4” thick, spaced 1/2” apart? Unsure. Any thought on ideal ratios?

Unfortunately, given that the wall is almost 9ft high, a 4×8 sheet still won’t cover the full height, so there will have to be a horizontal seam. Any tips for that?

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1557 posts in 742 days


#15 posted 05-03-2020 04:20 PM

Either buy 10’ plywood, or scab a 2’piece onto the end of your 8’ piece. (Biscuits and glue)
It doesn’t have to be structural, seeing that you will be adding all the strips to it.
The seam shouldn’t be very visible, depending on what you are doing in between the strips.
I would go with 10’ material and “get er done”

I’m doing a similar wall right now. The strips are 1 1/2” wide, with 1/2” space.
(ignore the cross brace note)

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