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Accurate Crosscuts

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Forum topic by Manitario posted 05-02-2020 07:20 PM 1039 views 1 time favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Manitario

2816 posts in 3693 days


05-02-2020 07:20 PM

Hey,

Just wondering what everyone is using to get accurate crosscuts? I have a mitre saw that is ok for smaller cuts eg. up to 6” or so but I’ve never been able to get it perfectly set up for wider cuts. Same thing with my homemade TS sled.

I do a lot of dovetailed casework in the 12-20” width range and find that I have to spend a frustrating amount of time using a shooting board to get the pieces square. Seems like regardless of whether people use a sliding MS or a TS sled, they are not perfect…I’ve considered getting the Sawstop sliding crosscut table for my TS and/or a different MS but kind of think that I’ll have the same difficulty regardless of my setup.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil


33 replies so far

View Andre's profile

Andre

3646 posts in 2616 days


#1 posted 05-02-2020 07:45 PM

12” to 15” Kreg mitre gauge on Table saw, over 15” to under 30”, fence on Table saw?
30” to 48”/96” plywood for cabinets, dewalt track saw:)

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5972 posts in 1384 days


#2 posted 05-02-2020 07:53 PM

Sled based on both miter slots. Starts from accurate easy sliding rails, and build up from there. Make it right, and most importantly test it for accuaracy and adjust using the William Ng school of thought with a 5 cut. Once you have it nailed down you are good for a long while.

With use, getting moved, lifted etc etc etc all of them will loose accuaracy over time. Usually you will feel it in the rails, or the fence. When you do, or heaven forbid you notice poor cuts, build another to replace the old one.

Most accurate, and safest crosscut you can have. Offcuts are also carried through the blade, so no little piece of potential rocket left next to the blade, and you don’t have to keep waiting for the saw to come to a stop to safely pluck away the offcuts.

Build goals are something light enough to not make you hate using it, but big enough to be useful. 1/2” ply is plenty for the deck.

-- Think safe, be safe

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

26199 posts in 3493 days


#3 posted 05-02-2020 10:03 PM

hmmm, dead accurate, everytime…any angle

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1472 posts in 1398 days


#4 posted 05-02-2020 10:10 PM

Incra M1000 miter gauge and fence:

Incra M1000 with Shop Stop Fence
TS-LS Accuracy (1/32”) & Repeatability (.002”) for Cross Cuts

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2829 posts in 2655 days


#5 posted 05-03-2020 03:14 AM

MFT style table and festool track saw.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5972 posts in 1384 days


#6 posted 05-03-2020 05:04 AM

Falls into, a lot of ways to skin a cat.

No clear path to a choice. I like threads like this. Make ya think.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Tony_S's profile (online now)

Tony_S

1336 posts in 3893 days


#7 posted 05-03-2020 10:30 AM


Just kidding….but not.
I’ve got an Altendorf and an SCM in the shop. Not as pretty as the one above, both 15-20 years old…but both provide dead nutz repeatable crosscuts.
But with that said…..


I ve considered getting the Sawstop sliding crosscut table for my TS and/or a different MS but kind of think that I ll have the same difficulty regardless of my setup.
- Manitario

What makes you think the Sawstop sliding table would fail you?
I’ve never used one so I can’t speak from personal experience, but they seem to be designed and built on the same/similar mechanics as the Euro sliders. It’s a proven design used my most major manufacturers.
I didn’t read any reviews at all either….maybe they’re crapola. I would doubt that though given their reputation for quality saws.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

968 posts in 411 days


#8 posted 05-03-2020 12:43 PM

I got rid of my chop saw to save room. I doubt it was ever very accurate anyway. My weapon of choice is a dual track sled. I bought a better miter gauge but don’t use it much for cross cuts.

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1008 posts in 2459 days


#9 posted 05-03-2020 01:34 PM

I see many comments here are answering about small dimension stock, not the larger panels you are talking about. Small stuff, my TS with Osborn gauge or one of my sleds. If really anal, I now have a Lyon miter triller. Love it.
For the larger panels you are talking about, I see no reason a good sled would not be dead on if a proper blade. Might want to go full kerf and check your sleds and saw alignment. I can do 4 cuts around a 12 inch square and not see light against my try square.

Table Saws, no matter the sled, have a very hard time with 16 foot moulding. So, keeping my miter saw.

In some comments, the SS sled may or may not be compatible with any other brand of saw. Investigate for yourself. Some may consider the need to drill a hole as incompatible, don’t know, so check it out.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3867 posts in 2032 days


#10 posted 05-03-2020 02:54 PM



Falls into, a lot of ways to skin a cat.

- therealSteveN

Method #103: Belt sander 8^)

Without a sliding table saw, you need someway to engage the saw miter slots for alignment before cutting begins. The most direct way is a large sled with long runners.

Beyond that, the aforementioned sliding table saw, there always is a radial arm saw or track saw.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2816 posts in 3693 days


#11 posted 05-03-2020 03:04 PM

Thanks for the comments. It sounds like the majority use TS sleds; I guess that I need to either make mine lighter so that it isn’t such a PITA to use it and/or also work to make it dead-on accurate.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

968 posts in 411 days


#12 posted 05-03-2020 04:24 PM

Making a sled is a very rewarding project when getting started and will get used often.

View hairy's profile

hairy

3084 posts in 4342 days


#13 posted 05-03-2020 04:53 PM

I have an Incra 1000HD in a Miter Express. It’s my everyday sled for everything but dadoe’s. . I keep it right behind the saw, takes no time to put on or off. The biggest panel I’ve cut is 18”, but this is good up to 24” cross cut.

I believe in cry once, and haven’t cried over this since I got it.

https://www.incra.com/miter_gauges-miter_express.html

https://www.incra.com/miter_gauges-miter1000hd.html


-- Genghis Khan and his brother Don, couldn't keep on keeping on...

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1472 posts in 1398 days


#14 posted 05-03-2020 05:05 PM

Incrahhh!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View DaveM123's profile

DaveM123

60 posts in 103 days


#15 posted 05-03-2020 05:09 PM

The Incra miter gauge is solid. I also have the Dubby sleds and they work just fine.

-- Dave

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