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White spots on kitchen island after scrubbing off paint splatter

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Forum topic by boston_guy posted 05-01-2020 02:53 PM 353 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boston_guy

211 posts in 3064 days


05-01-2020 02:53 PM

I have a kitchen island that had some paint splatter on it after I panted the kitchen ceiling some years ago. I should have gotten rid of the paint spots long ago. However, I only did it a few days ago.

Most of the paint came off easily. But there were some spots that were quite stubborn. I was using a rag soaked with a mixture of bleach, detergent and water. This was probably my first mistake. Maybe the mixture was too harsh for my purpose. The actual reason I used the mixture was that the inside of the island had a lot of dust because the island’s top had been removed when I was having my kitchen ceiling plastered. This made it easy to move around. So the dust had settled inside the island.

Anyway, what I noticed was that I now had some white spots on the certain parts of the island after I finished scrubbing off the paint.

How can I fix this? Would wipe on polyurethane solve it? Or do I have to re-stain the whole island? I hope not. I only have myself to blame for not asking how to deal with the paint spots before I embarked on the project.

I’m attaching a photo so that you can see the spots that I’m talking about.

-- boston_guy


12 replies so far

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controlfreak

1386 posts in 516 days


#1 posted 05-01-2020 03:20 PM

I think a clear coat of poly will do it but to test wipe with a damp rag. If it looks good I think you are okay, if not you may need to sand the entire surface and refinish.

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boston_guy

211 posts in 3064 days


#2 posted 05-02-2020 05:00 PM

Thanks for the tip.

Whenever I wipe with a wet rag, the area looks good.

I guess I don’t have much to lose by trying a wipe on poly. We’ll see.

I just wasn’t looking forward to sanding the whole island and applying stain and poly. :)

-- boston_guy

View squazo's profile

squazo

204 posts in 2560 days


#3 posted 05-02-2020 08:42 PM

I did the exact same thing to my hardwood floors, they were polyurethaned and then I got some paint splatter on them and left it for years. I too scrubbed it and had some spots like yours, I found that basically I had rubbed the sheen out of the poly and was able to fix it with automotive buffing compound, I couldn’t get it to match perfectly so I feathered it out over a few inches so it was a gradual difference in sheen, you can barely tell.

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boston_guy

211 posts in 3064 days


#4 posted 05-03-2020 02:21 AM

The buffing compound does not come off when you clean the floors?

Thanks for the feedback.

-- boston_guy

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boston_guy

211 posts in 3064 days


#5 posted 05-03-2020 10:57 AM

By the way, I just found out that I have some leftover Minwax fast-drying satin polyurethane. It’s from a previous project. Can I use this as a wipe on? Probably not.

-- boston_guy

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controlfreak

1386 posts in 516 days


#6 posted 05-03-2020 11:14 AM

I have never tried wipe on poly

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boston_guy

211 posts in 3064 days


#7 posted 05-03-2020 02:30 PM

I have. I used it on my kitchen cabinets, some years ago. I found it easier to use than brush on poly.


I have never tried wipe on poly

- controlfreak


-- boston_guy

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boston_guy

211 posts in 3064 days


#8 posted 05-12-2020 08:19 PM

The oak edge of my kitchen island had stains that proved to be too stubborn to wipe out. I decided to sand it (with electric sander). The result was that it now looked much better.

However, after I sanded I noticed that it was now quite a bit lighter in color than the rest of the cabinet. This means that the cabinet definitely had a very light-colored stain before the poly was applied.

After first getting worried that I’d have to find a similar stain and apply it before using the wipe on poly, I decided to simply leave the top’s edge as is (with its natural color). I’ve already applied 3 coats of the Minwax Satin wipe on poly. by the way, the top weighs like a ton. Is it the tiles that make it so heavy?

Attached is a photo (rear view because the lighting was better).

Does the top look weird when contrasted with the rest of the island?

-- boston_guy

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boston_guy

211 posts in 3064 days


#9 posted 05-13-2020 02:26 AM

By the way, my situation with the island’s top edge is not related to the original problem that got me started with this thread. The original problem had to do with white spots on the sides of the island. That problem was solved by simply rubbing poly.

The island’s top edge, which surrounds the tiles, is oak. It just needed to be sanded to bring out its beauty. The only problem is that the light stain it had came off. And I applied poly with its natural color which is lighter than the rest of the island since the rest of the island has this light stain.

Just mentioning all this in case my previous post was confusing.

-- boston_guy

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LittleShaver

706 posts in 1534 days


#10 posted 05-13-2020 03:36 PM

In my house, the decision would be left to my wife.
If you have to darken the edge, I’m sure you’ll have to sand off the poly and start fresh.

-- Sawdust Maker

View gtrgeo's profile

gtrgeo

134 posts in 1345 days


#11 posted 05-13-2020 04:48 PM

You will probably need to scuff sand the panel and re-apply poly since it looks like the finish is damaged. You can use regular poly and thin at 50% to apply as a wipe on if you prefer. You may want to thin with something hotter than mineral spirits when applying on a vertical surface as it may sag if the dry time is too long.

Just a tip when dealing with latex paint spatter. Latex paint will dissolve with denatured alcohol and the alcohol is generally harmless to most finishes. Older spots of latex paint may require soaking or repeated wiping with an alcohol soaked rag but it will usually remove the spot.

George

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wood2woodknot

109 posts in 2888 days


#12 posted 05-14-2020 04:03 PM

If it looks right when you wet it, I would try an old remedy for removing water rings on finished table tops. Can’t hurt.

Just take a dab of mayonnaise on you finger tip and rub it in good and then buff with a soft cloth or towel. I am amazed this always seems to work. If not, just wipe it off again with soap and water.

I have never understood how/why this works.

-- ajh

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