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Experience With Osmo

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Forum topic by OnhillWW posted 04-27-2020 07:41 PM 640 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OnhillWW

256 posts in 2080 days


04-27-2020 07:41 PM

I have limited experience with Osmo Polyx-Oil. Last year I used it to finish a number of small projects and so far I like the results. I am contemplating it’s use for a project I am planning but would like to know if any one has used this and then top coated it with laquer. I know that I probably could hit it with dewaxed shellac between the two but I’m looking to streamline the process if possible. I know that sometimes things appear to be working only to go south 6 months to a year later so I’m hoping someone has blazed this path before me. Thanks

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad


12 replies so far

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Andre

3694 posts in 2654 days


#1 posted 04-27-2020 10:14 PM

I would have to ask, Why? The purpose of OSMOs is the ability to refinish or repair if and when necessary.
They also make a type designed for floors if you are looking for something more durable? Want more gloss add another coat or 2 and buff!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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SMP

2447 posts in 754 days


#2 posted 04-27-2020 11:05 PM

Agree, you are defeating the purpose. Just use blo, way cheaper.

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OnhillWW

256 posts in 2080 days


#3 posted 04-28-2020 03:50 AM

My usual go to is Waterlox but it builds rather slowly when wiped on and as this project will have many intersecting surfaces on different planes I wanted to avoid any buildup in crevices and intersecting surfaces. I find that a thin coat or two of lacquer adds depth to the finish in the way clear coat adds depth to an automotive finish. I appreciate the help.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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Rich

5868 posts in 1437 days


#4 posted 04-28-2020 04:38 AM

What will the final piece be used for? I don’t understand why you’d use Osmo Polyx and then top it with lacquer. Just use the lacquer. If you do go with your idea, it’d be easy to do a test board with Osmo and then lacquer to see if you get good adherence and durability.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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OnhillWW

256 posts in 2080 days


#5 posted 04-28-2020 12:46 PM

The piece is designed to hold jewelry and as such it will potentially be handled daily. These are made from contrasting mixed species, Lacquer alone doesn’t give the appearance I am looking for. I like the way Osmo brings out the grain and offers the coloration I prefer with an easy, low odor application. As I stated above the lacquer would add depth to the finish and perhaps a bit of resistance to hand oils over time? I plan to do a test piece as soon as it warms up here but even that will not tell me whether the lacquer to Osmo bond will endure over time. That is why I was hoping someone had already blazed that path and could let me know if the combo lasted over time.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

708 posts in 627 days


#6 posted 04-28-2020 01:00 PM

I have used Osmo extensively. No do not top coat it. It will stand up to handling (IMHO). It is intended as a floor finish after all.

I use the satin, I put on three (very thin) coats then rub with #0000 wool and lube, then a fourth. The result is outstanding.

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nickbatz

598 posts in 928 days


#7 posted 07-31-2020 11:26 PM



I have used Osmo extensively. No do not top coat it. It will stand up to handling (IMHO). It is intended as a floor finish after all.

I use the satin, I put on three (very thin) coats then rub with #0000 wool and lube, then a fourth. The result is outstanding.

- BlueRidgeDog

I’m going to be finishing a walnut desk with this stuff – assuming my client okays it, and I think he will.

What kind of lube, if you don’t mind? Thanks!

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BlueRidgeDog

708 posts in 627 days


#8 posted 08-08-2020 10:37 AM

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6417 posts in 3341 days


#9 posted 08-08-2020 12:59 PM

There’s nothing in the listed ingredients that would make it not work. I have never used it, but I’m fairly certain you’re good to go.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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987Ron

84 posts in 164 days


#10 posted 08-08-2020 02:26 PM

I have used it on some walnut and liked the results. Also on some boxes to hold tools and accessories in the shop. Very durable but overnight between coats is suggested on the label. So far quite pleased with it.

-- It's not a mistake it's a design opportunity

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nickbatz

598 posts in 928 days


#11 posted 08-08-2020 03:21 PM

Well, it arrived yesterday and I’ll be finishing the desk in a few days. Looking forward to it.

Thanks for the replies.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

708 posts in 627 days


#12 posted 08-16-2020 12:29 AM

I do overnight between coats. My standard is first coat medium, wipe off excess after ten to twenty minutes. Second coat is light, third very light, then rub out. Fourth is just a wispier at that point (the wood is sealed after the first, so successive coats are fast and use little material). You could cut it to just three and rub out before the third, but I have found the four coat method makes such an unusual and perfect feel to the hand while protecting without a plastic like look for touch.

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