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Straightening Warped or Bowed

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Forum topic by Italo78 posted 04-25-2020 03:43 PM 1025 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Italo78

18 posts in 2350 days


04-25-2020 03:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: warped bowed straightening

Good morning my fellows Jocks.
Can someone tell me how to straighten warped or bowed wood. I have tried dampening the wood and placing weights on the piece of lumber to try straightening it, but I have no success. I can’t plane the wood since I need it to be the thickness it’s currently at. That’s what happens wen you purchase wood in advance and then storing flat on a pool table for a few years. Please help.


13 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4443 posts in 3249 days


#1 posted 04-25-2020 04:22 PM

I would like to recommend that first you straighten your method of woodworking. There’s no magic board fixes on this planet.
Here’s the cure buy lumber oversized and sneak up to your final thickness. Sometimes this can take a few day or a couple weeks.
How we store project wood matters too.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View procleaningusa's profile

procleaningusa

4 posts in 752 days


#2 posted 04-25-2020 04:34 PM

I used to bend wood by wetting, heating it a bit and then clamping for a while

-- Pro Cleaning USA, http://professionalcleaningusa.affiliatblogger.com/

View ocean's profile

ocean

232 posts in 2284 days


#3 posted 04-25-2020 04:46 PM

In must cases you can’t un-bow or un-warp your wood. As Aj2 said buy bigger wood and sneak up on your final size.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View LesB's profile

LesB

3457 posts in 4894 days


#4 posted 04-25-2020 05:05 PM

Wood sometimes moves in mysterious ways. It can curve or bow, twist, and cup as it dries.
The only way I know to correct these is to resize it which you say you can’t do. In some cases if you are fastening it to the project with mechanical methods you can force it to straighten out; for example nailing or screwing it down.

In the past some tract home builders used a lot of inexpensive “wet” hemlock fir for framing and the challenge for the builder was to get it all nailed in place before it started to bend and twist as it dried.

-- Les B, Oregon

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2929 posts in 4244 days


#5 posted 04-25-2020 05:36 PM

So Ted’s is at it again.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2829 posts in 3296 days


#6 posted 04-25-2020 06:25 PM

I’ve had some success with removing warp by over clamping, by that I mean instead of clamping to remove the warp, I clamp a 1 inch piece between the pieces, so I’m going an inch past what would be flat. I started with the insert in the middle and moved towards the end that had the most warp. In my case I had two 8 foot long Pieces that warped about 4 or 5 inches in one direction. I rotated them so the ends moved opposite each other like a long Y shape, then clamped them together with a small piece in between, took a couple of weeks though.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1542 posts in 2554 days


#7 posted 04-25-2020 06:44 PM

Is this a long plank that will be cut to smaller sizes to make your project? If so, check it carefully to see if the warp or twist or bow is in only a small area where you can cut around it. It is frequently the case that a plank will be mostly straight but have a warp or twist in only one area. Even if it is evenly warped throughout the entire length, when it is cut to shorter lengths, they may require only slight planing for the project. This is the nature of wood.

More to the point of your question, it is usually fruitless to try to force a warped board back to straight. Even if you succeed, it will usually return to crooked again. And, if you get it straight and use it in a project, it may very well put unwanted stresses on your project that may twist it out of shape or break something.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3482 posts in 2055 days


#8 posted 04-25-2020 06:57 PM



In must cases you can t un-bow or un-warp your wood. As Aj2 said buy bigger wood and sneak up on your final size.

- ocean


+1 Usually not a fix for that.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

5211 posts in 2427 days


#9 posted 04-25-2020 11:59 PM

I remember reading in one of the magazines the best tool for cupped or bowed boards is the fire place.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

9603 posts in 2164 days


#10 posted 04-26-2020 12:18 AM

watch this video will help you out of your warped boards :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

9603 posts in 2164 days


#11 posted 04-26-2020 12:22 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJkp0GFeMKg

watching this video will help you make flat boards :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View M_Dominic's profile

M_Dominic

12 posts in 3428 days


#12 posted 04-26-2020 02:13 AM

Two, rather last ditch, things I have done.
If the board is relatively thin, say 1/4” or so, you can probably glue it to another piece, especially at 90 degrees relative grain, and have it be ok. Of course that’s asking a lot of flexibility in your design. That approach is a little bit of making your own plywood.

If thickness is key but width is not then ripping and regluing can be nearly invisible if you rip down the right grain line. Quarter sawn is obviously better for this.

Unless your project happens to permit this kind of hack it will likely be nearly impossible to actually straighten the board.

-- Dominic Ryan

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3482 posts in 2055 days


#13 posted 04-26-2020 02:27 AM



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJkp0GFeMKg

watching this video will help you make flat boards :<))

- GR8HUNTER


Charles was like a friend that I never met. Even though he was THE Charles Neil he would always find time to respond here on ljs. I miss him.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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