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Forum topic by Alias1431 posted 04-24-2020 05:52 PM 408 views 0 times favorited 1 reply Add to Favorites Watch
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Alias1431

8 posts in 584 days


04-24-2020 05:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shop cabinets storage rolling shaker plan

I have a table-top drill press, a planer, a sander, a grinder, etc. I’m too old to be picking up and moving these things all the time, especially the DW 735 planer – weighs a ton. I’d like to put each of these on their own rolling cabinet but I want something that looks nice, too. I like shaker cabinets. I want a wood finish, no paint.
I’m looking for advice on what kind of wood to use including the plywood parts. Also I need plans – I’m not good at doing those myself. I always waste too much plywood.

I’d like each cabinet to be dedicated to a single tool. The cabinet in the picture, if split up into 3 cabinets would be about the right size cabinets and would give me a variety of storage options.

Any advice or plans available?


1 reply so far

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LesB

3137 posts in 4726 days


#1 posted 04-25-2020 02:24 AM

For a wood at reasonable prices you have oak (red or white), maple or birch, and even pine although it is a bit soft and easily distressed. If appearance is not an issue fir is a good choice for both wood and plywood. The first three are available in solid wood and plywood. Use solid wood for the face frames and door frames, 3/4” plywood for the cabinet box and bottom and 1/4” plywood for the door panels. You could also use plywood for the top unless you have another idea.
For plans any basic cabinet plan will do just substitute wheels for the toe board space.

When you have the dimensions for the cabinets then draw out a cut pattern for dividing the 4X8’ plywood sheets to help reduce the waste. I use a computer CAD program but in the “old” days I used graph paper. If you want them to look nice pay attention to the grain direction of each piece. Some waste is unavoidable but some tweaking of the size of your cabinets (slightly larger or smaller) might help with that.

-- Les B, Oregon

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