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Craftsman 113 Jointer

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Forum topic by TTH posted 04-23-2020 01:31 PM 1521 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TTH

32 posts in 542 days


04-23-2020 01:31 PM

There haven’t been many jointers on my local CL lately, and this one has been up now for a week.

https://dallas.craigslist.org/dal/tls/d/forney-sears-craftsman-jointer/7110369236.html

I’ve read a posts about these jointers and it seems like they are something of a mixed bag. Just looking at the condition it is in, I think the seller is probably asking too much at $150. But I was thinking of offering $90 and seeing what they said.

Have any of you had much luck restoring these jointers and getting satisfactory results with them? I can’t imagine replacement parts will be easy to come by at all. Am I better off to just keep buying S2S lumber and waiting for something better to come along?

Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

-- Travis, DFW


12 replies so far

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2281 posts in 2887 days


#1 posted 04-23-2020 01:44 PM

Technology has not changed. Blades are available. A new belt of course. Not much to one. Can’t tell if all the parts are actually there. ( No blade safety cover? ) Maybe you can find an owners manual /parts diagram on the WEB to see.

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Aj2

4064 posts in 3036 days


#2 posted 04-23-2020 02:02 PM

Wait for something better. The outfeed table is not adjustable it’s fixed and they way the knives are set in the head is very finicky. Its not worth your time or trouble even if it were free.

Good Luck

-- Aj

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TTH

32 posts in 542 days


#3 posted 04-23-2020 02:25 PM



Wait for something better. The outfeed table is not adjustable it’s fixed and they way the knives are set in the head is very finicky. Its not worth your time or trouble even if it were free.

Good Luck

- Aj2

Thank you. I think this is what I needed to have someone tell me because I’m so thirsty for a jointer.

-- Travis, DFW

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

2861 posts in 839 days


#4 posted 04-23-2020 02:33 PM

I picked up one of those for $150 and cleaned up the rust. I bought two sets of knives and made a jig with help here to set the knives.

I get good results out of it but after looking back I should have offered less but I also picked up a Stanley Bailey No. 5 for $25 so it was worth the trip. I was on a limited woodworking budget starting out so it worked for me.

View hokieman's profile

hokieman

202 posts in 4992 days


#5 posted 04-23-2020 03:12 PM

I bought that jointer almost 40 years ago and still use it, I have never understood the resistance some folks have to a fixed outfeed table. The infeed table on this model is fully adjustable on all 4 of its corners. It takes a little patience but I can get mine adjusted fine. I only have to mess with one table. When I think of a jointer with adjustable Infeed and outfeed tables I would think you enter in more room for error. You have to adjust one extra table. But then again, I have never owned a jointer with both tables adjustable so I might be wrong.

With respect to this jointer, my major beef with mine is it was not well machined. The tables are not completely flat which is bothersome. Out by as much as 10 thou. Watch out for that. Also check to make sure the adjustment on the I feed table is not sloppy. I agree with you, though, $150 is too much. Mine isn’t worth that but then again I’d rather buy other tools I don’t have rather than replacing my jointer.

If I didn’t have a jointer, then no question, I would get an 8 inch jointer with a spiral cutter head. These are expensive but if you are young and have many, many years of woodworking in your future I don’t think you’d regret it.

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Aj2

4064 posts in 3036 days


#6 posted 04-23-2020 04:00 PM

@hokieman yes you are correct the craftsman jointer that I had did have the four corner adjustment. I remember turning it up side down to get to them. This is not what makes it undesirable.
Having the ability to raise and lower the outfeed in the same fashion as the infeed is key. Because if the knives get set a little high or low it doesn’t really matter as long as they are all the same distance out of the head. The last adjustment is done with the outfeed knob or handle.
A new woodworker will likely get frustrated trying to figure how to get a fixed out machine to cut flat boards.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

29687 posts in 3921 days


#7 posted 04-23-2020 04:34 PM

Used one of those jointers for a few decades…..biggest complaint was the spring used for the cutter guard….had a bad habit of breaking. No longer have the room for it, in my shop…so

“We have ways” These are #7 and #6 Stanley Jointers….and…

My #8 Jointer….for the really big jobs….

The #113 Jointer was made for Sears by Emerson. Sears NEVER, EVER made any tools, they merely sold them.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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controlfreak

2861 posts in 839 days


#8 posted 04-23-2020 04:49 PM

@AJ2 I had a heck of a time setting the knife height. I was trying the method where you measure how far you can “pull” a straight edge by hand turning the cutter wheel. Having three knives and adjustable outfeed would only add a fourth thing to screw up for me. Using the 123 block and dial gauge I was able to set the blades dead even with the outfeed table and get flat boards. The only way I can tune the infeed table is to buy a straight edge that would cost about half of what I paid for the jointer. As you said, it sounds like a pain to do so if I start getting poor quality due to infeed table I may just sell it and trade up. It will get me by until it doesn’t for now.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

29687 posts in 3921 days


#9 posted 04-23-2020 04:56 PM

They actually sold a knife setter gauge FOR that jointer….work pretty well, too….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

4064 posts in 3036 days


#10 posted 04-23-2020 06:18 PM



@AJ2 I had a heck of a time setting the knife height. I was trying the method where you measure how far you can “pull” a straight edge by hand turning the cutter wheel. Having three knives and adjustable outfeed would only add a fourth thing to screw up for me. Using the 123 block and dial gauge I was able to set the blades dead even with the outfeed table and get flat boards. The only way I can tune the infeed table is to buy a straight edge that would cost about half of what I paid for the jointer. As you said, it sounds like a pain to do so if I start getting poor quality due to infeed table I may just sell it and trade up. It will get me by until it doesn t for now.

- controlfreak

I’m not sure what tune the infeed table means. I do think most get the functions of a jointer mixed up.
Raising and lowering the infeed and outfeed tables on a tuned up jointer is not a big deal.
Alignment of jointer beds so that when they are raised and lowered is something every decent jointer that China has copied has.
Some jointers are set up once at the factory and are not really meant be tweaked for coplaner. But they are meant to be raised and lowered.
One example of a jointer that set up at the factory is a dovetail ways.
This guy teaches woodworking and has a good all around explanation of a jointer.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ob3V5SVrqAw&list=LL&index=10&t=459s

-- Aj

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2634 posts in 4031 days


#11 posted 04-23-2020 07:18 PM

I had one for thirty years, and it was great out of the box. I didn’t have a good enough square or other tools to check it. Built a lot of cabinets and other projects. It is fine to start with for less than the asking price IF you can get a blade guard. I just gave mine to my nephew. I see them in Illinois for no more than $200, with blade guard and without rust. Personally, I wouldn’t have a jointer with out a blade guard. Just too dangerous.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

776 posts in 2969 days


#12 posted 04-23-2020 07:36 PM

I had one of these jointers 10+ years ago—my dad passed it on to me. I was never able to get it adjusted correctly. The out-feed table is fixed if I remember correctly. I ended up giving it away and bought a Jet jointer that I’ve been very happy with.

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