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Spraying Precat Lacquer

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Forum topic by kyngfish posted 04-20-2020 11:51 PM 298 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kyngfish

114 posts in 893 days


04-20-2020 11:51 PM

Hi All – so on the advice of some folks in this forum I decided to finish off some cabinets with precat lacquer. I taped up a test woodshop cabinet before trying on my finished cabinets just to work out any bugs, and I’m glad I did.

A few quick questions. First, my equipment is a Devilbiss FLG4 Gun using the 1.5mm tip. (I also have the 1.3 and 1.8). I have a Puma 2 stage compressor rated at [email protected] I set the pressure at first at 90PSI to the gun inlet and dialed down the pressure at the gun so that I was getting 24 PSI into the gun itself with the trigger pressed.

I strained the primer before putting it through the gun, dialed in my fan and paint amount.

I found that I had to have the paint volume setting on the gun screwed almost all the way out to get much volume coming out of the gun, after that, I felt like the coverage was OK – but despite that, i feel like it should be more adjustable, is this a thinning issue? Nozzle issue? Both? That stuff felt pretty watery coming out of the can, so I didn’t see a need to thin it.

Also – weather here is high sixties and sunny.

Cheers.


11 replies so far

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

871 posts in 983 days


#1 posted 04-21-2020 01:49 AM

Probably have to thin it. Also, use the 1.8 tip.

I much prefer using a pressure fed gun with tinted precat.

You mentioned primer. What type of primer? I self seal with precat.

View hkmiller's profile

hkmiller

235 posts in 885 days


#2 posted 04-21-2020 01:51 AM

I use a 1.3 tip with lacquer, without thinning. Set my psi between 25-30 at the gun.

-- always something

View kyngfish's profile

kyngfish

114 posts in 893 days


#3 posted 04-21-2020 01:55 AM

Precat lacquer primer. Any thoughts on the ratio? Unfortunately HVLP is all I have.


Probably have to thin it. Also, use the 1.8 tip.

I much prefer using a pressure fed gun with tinted precat.

You mentioned primer. What type of primer? I self seal with precat.

- CWWoodworking


View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

436 posts in 3152 days


#4 posted 04-21-2020 02:08 AM

You are doing the right thing testing before spraying actual project.
I have been spraying Sherwin Williams pre-cat lacquer on cabinets/doors. 1.4mm tip I believe in a ‘no name brand’ HVLP gun. I have thinned vinyl sealer up to 20% without issue. I find their sealer seems to go on ‘dryer’ than other lacquer I have used, however, it sands out easily. I typically set gun at 25-30 PSI.
I tend to spray SW tinted lacquer without thinning.

I will add, as I type this I am waiting on lacquer seal coat to dry before spraying top coat on some drawer boxes.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

871 posts in 983 days


#5 posted 04-21-2020 02:21 AM

What is the product name or company? There is a ton of different product out there.

What type of wood?

What type of finish are you after? Full fill or just white?

If the latter, skip the primer and just shoot 3 coats of precat. This would be for something like Sherwin Williams precat.

View kyngfish's profile

kyngfish

114 posts in 893 days


#6 posted 04-21-2020 02:30 AM

Sherwin Williams from their commercial store.

Going onto Baltic birch plywood

Using the pre cat primer and then tinted lacquer in a medium gloss. Going for a shiny ish look.

When you say vinyl sealer do you mean pre cat primer?


You are doing the right thing testing before spraying actual project.
I have been spraying Sherwin Williams pre-cat lacquer on cabinets/doors. 1.4mm tip I believe in a no name brand HVLP gun. I have thinned vinyl sealer up to 20% without issue. I find their sealer seems to go on dryer than other lacquer I have used, however, it sands out easily. I typically set gun at 25-30 PSI.
I tend to spray SW tinted lacquer without thinning.

I will add, as I type this I am waiting on lacquer seal coat to dry before spraying top coat on some drawer boxes.

- cracknpop


View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

436 posts in 3152 days


#7 posted 04-21-2020 03:12 AM

Just visited SW website, I use Sher-Wood Fast Dry Vinyl Sealer. Just learned they have White Precat primer surfacer, which is not available at my local store. Is that what you are using?
If so, per the Product Data Sheet, ”Reduce as needed for application up to 20% with R6K18 (Butyl Acetate) or
R7K320 HAPS Compliant Lacquer Reducer
.”


Sherwin Williams from their commercial store.

Going onto Baltic birch plywood

Using the pre cat primer and then tinted lacquer in a medium gloss. Going for a shiny ish look.

When you say vinyl sealer do you mean pre cat primer?

You are doing the right thing testing before spraying actual project.
I have been spraying Sherwin Williams pre-cat lacquer on cabinets/doors. 1.4mm tip I believe in a no name brand HVLP gun. I have thinned vinyl sealer up to 20% without issue. I find their sealer seems to go on dryer than other lacquer I have used, however, it sands out easily. I typically set gun at 25-30 PSI.
I tend to spray SW tinted lacquer without thinning.

I will add, as I type this I am waiting on lacquer seal coat to dry before spraying top coat on some drawer boxes.

- cracknpop

- kyngfish


-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View CaptainKlutz's profile (online now)

CaptainKlutz

3341 posts in 2298 days


#8 posted 04-21-2020 04:15 AM

SW vinyl sealer has heavier body than pre-cat, even though it looks thin. Typically I only use it when grain sealing large pore wood, or sealing in a NGR dye stain. It also works well on mixed wood projects where the woods absorb finish at different rates, it is equalizer (like epoxy primer in auto world). :)
It prefers larger 1.6-1.8 tip, and higher pressures than pre-cat. Viscosity also seems highly temperature dependent to me. In 80°+ temps it flows better than cooler temperature. Usually thin it 10% when it’s cool, and/or add 5-10% retarder when it’s over 80° as AZ low humidity exaggerates the dry spray tendency mentioned above.

+1 don’t need vinyl sealer, can use pre-cat as base coat.

Most SW industrial distributors have paint professionals on staff. Do not be afraid to give them a call and ask for local recommendation based your location. One of the 1st things I learned from my suppliers when I moved to AZ, was need to track RH and add slower (or retarder) solvents due RH and not due temperature.

+1 Applaud your test efforts. :-)

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View kyngfish's profile

kyngfish

114 posts in 893 days


#9 posted 04-21-2020 04:49 AM

Hmm. Not using vinyl sealer tho. Using precat primer. :)


SW vinyl sealer has heavier body than pre-cat, even though it looks thin. Typically I only use it when grain sealing large pore wood, or sealing in a NGR dye stain. It also works well on mixed wood projects where the woods absorb finish at different rates, it is equalizer (like epoxy primer in auto world). :)
It prefers larger 1.6-1.8 tip, and higher pressures than pre-cat. Viscosity also seems highly temperature dependent to me. In 80°+ temps it flows better than cooler temperature. Usually thin it 10% when it s cool, and/or add 5-10% retarder when it s over 80° as AZ low humidity exaggerates the dry spray tendency mentioned above.

+1 don t need vinyl sealer, can use pre-cat as base coat.

Most SW industrial distributors have paint professionals on staff. Do not be afraid to give them a call and ask for local recommendation based your location. One of the 1st things I learned from my suppliers when I moved to AZ, was need to track RH and add slower (or retarder) solvents due RH and not due temperature.

+1 Applaud your test efforts. :-)

Best Luck!

- CaptainKlutz


View CWWoodworking's profile

CWWoodworking

871 posts in 983 days


#10 posted 04-21-2020 10:36 AM

For future reference precat might not be the best choice for a shiny filled(if that’s what your after) look because of the mil limit associated with the system.

Try 2 coats of primer thinned enough to spray right. Don’t sand in between. Sand after second coat. Then 2 light coats of precat. Again thinned to spray right.

I was told the butyl acetate will make it dry quicker than lacquer thinner for thinning.

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

357 posts in 763 days


#11 posted 04-21-2020 11:46 AM

When spraying lenmar precat undercoater I’ll thin about 50% and spray with a 1.8 tip (with a 4 stage fuji hvlp)

Pigmented precat lacquer thinned about 33% and a 1.5 tip

Clear precat thinned i usually thin around 25% and 1.8 tip.

The ratio of thinner and retarder depends on the weather of the day.

If you mean waterborne and not solvent ignore what I just posted

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