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Forum topic by bilyo posted 04-17-2020 10:34 PM 579 views 1 time favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bilyo

1134 posts in 1909 days


04-17-2020 10:34 PM

I have a remote control unit for my dust collector that has worked well for several years. It has the Woodcraft name on it but, it looks the same as the yellow one that Rockler sells and the black Jet model that Woodcraft now sells. The remote transmitter fob for mine is getting finicky (probably the switch wearing out). I have emailed Woodcraft to see if a replacement fob is available. In the event they say no, I’m wondering if one of the universal transmitters that you can get for gate openers, etc. would work. Anyone know about these? It would have to be somehow programmable for the correct frequency.


23 replies so far

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2843 posts in 3729 days


#1 posted 04-17-2020 10:39 PM

I had the exact same issue with my Grizzly. I just gave up and put a switch on the wall.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

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Jim Finn

2843 posts in 3729 days


#2 posted 04-17-2020 10:40 PM

I had the exact same issue with my Grizzly. I just gave up and put a switch on the wall.

-- No PHD just a DD214 Lubbock Texas

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mjheck

37 posts in 1956 days


#3 posted 04-17-2020 11:45 PM

I have the same remote and was having the same problem. I thought that maybe the battery was going out but a new one didn’t help. I noticed that when I had it apart the the red stem that works the switch seemed loose. I fiddled around with it but not sure I did any good. I have found that if I push the switch firmer than I was it engages almost all the time now. Rockler does sell a replacement fob for $25.

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Andre

3629 posts in 2613 days


#4 posted 04-18-2020 05:20 AM

I use a rc control plug from H.D. has the required amp ratings, think it was under $20.00

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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ohtimberwolf

1000 posts in 3159 days


#5 posted 04-18-2020 12:41 PM

Good reviews here. My $70 control failed also and I too may try this one. It is 40 amps and two hand remotes. larry

https://www.amazon.com/DONJON-Household-Appliances-Electrical-Equipment/dp/B07CTL3TG6/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=donjon%2Bremote%2Bcontrol%2Bswitches%2B20%2Bamp&qid=1587213084&sr=8-2&th=1

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

135 posts in 1926 days


#6 posted 04-18-2020 12:43 PM

I strung nylon line around the shop and use pull cords for on and off. Purely mechanical, almost free, and 100% reliable so far.

View clagwell's profile

clagwell

278 posts in 599 days


#7 posted 04-18-2020 01:02 PM



Good reviews here. My $70 control failed also and I too may try this one. It is 40 amps and two hand remotes. larry

https://www.amazon.com/DONJON-Household-Appliances-Electrical-Equipment/dp/B07CTL3TG6/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=donjon%2Bremote%2Bcontrol%2Bswitches%2B20%2Bamp&qid=1587213084&sr=8-2&th=1

- ohtimberwolf

The relay used in that remote is rated for 1HP at 120V or 0.5HP at 240V. Using it for a larger HP motor will shorten the contact life. Of course, at that price it’s no great loss if you have to replace it.

-- Dave, Tippecanoe County, IN --- Is there a corollary to Beranek.s Law that applies to dust collection?

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ohtimberwolf

1000 posts in 3159 days


#8 posted 04-18-2020 01:13 PM

Thanks Dave, I didn’t catch that when I saw the link. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3865 posts in 2029 days


#9 posted 04-18-2020 03:15 PM

I use a “long ranger III” and have been satisfied for nearly a decade so far (2hp, 220v DC).
Several times I have had the same switch issue you experienced and to fix it I just popped off the remote cover and gave the switch a quick blast of compressed air. These units usually use one of the small PC board mounted membrane type switches (sealed) that are common with many remotes. Usually it is always dust/dirt that seems to find a path inside.

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PCDub

190 posts in 1051 days


#10 posted 04-18-2020 04:33 PM



I strung nylon line around the shop and use pull cords for on and off. Purely mechanical, almost free, and 100% reliable so far.

- PeteStaehling

I love this!

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1134 posts in 1909 days


#11 posted 04-19-2020 03:13 PM

Thanks for all the tips. I was hoping that there might be a universal replacement, like a garage door opener transmitter, that would work or be adapted to work. Even though I think it is over priced, I may just get the replacement from Rockler and be done with it.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1134 posts in 1909 days


#12 posted 04-19-2020 05:35 PM

Good reviews here. My $70 control failed also and I too may try this one. It is 40 amps and two hand remotes. larry

https://www.amazon.com/DONJON-Household-Appliances-Electrical-Equipment/dp/B07CTL3TG6/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=donjon%2Bremote%2Bcontrol%2Bswitches%2B20%2Bamp&qid=1587213084&sr=8-2&th=1

- ohtimberwolf

The relay used in that remote is rated for 1HP at 120V or 0.5HP at 240V. Using it for a larger HP motor will shorten the contact life. Of course, at that price it s no great loss if you have to replace it.

- clagwell


Someone please help me out. While I understand the relationship between volts, amp, watts, It seems to me that something in the above doesn’t compute. The specs say that the unit has a capacity of 40 amps. Yet only accommodates a 1/2hp 240v motor. 40 amps X 240v = 9600 watts. Even if you cut that in half to allow for motor inefficiency and start-up load, it seems to me that you still have capacity to run a motor in the neighborhood of 5 hp. Please don’t get too technical. I’m obviously not an engineer.

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clagwell

278 posts in 599 days


#13 posted 04-19-2020 06:09 PM



Someone please help me out. While I understand the relationship between volts, amp, watts, It seems to me that something in the above doesn t compute. The specs say that the unit has a capacity of 40 amps. Yet only accommodates a 1/2hp 240v motor. 40 amps X 240v = 9600 watts. Even if you cut that in half to allow for motor inefficiency and start-up load, it seems to me that you still have capacity to run a motor in the neighborhood of 5 hp. Please don t get too technical. I m obviously not an engineer.

- bilyo

The issue with the HP rating is the ability to turn the motor off. When you turn off an induction motor there’s an inductive “kick” that causes a fat arc. That arc blasts metal off the contacts.

The HP rating deals with the spacing between the contacts and the thickness of the contacts. Wider spacing snuffs the arc sooner, thus removing less material, and thicker contacts tolerate more material removal.

At rated HP the switch will reach it’s rated life. Lower HP longer life. Higher HP shorter life.

And before you ask, no, I don’t know what the life rating is for that relay. ;-)

-- Dave, Tippecanoe County, IN --- Is there a corollary to Beranek.s Law that applies to dust collection?

View John Jardin's profile

John Jardin

68 posts in 447 days


#14 posted 04-19-2020 06:27 PM

nice job Pete…clever and resourceful
John J

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1134 posts in 1909 days


#15 posted 04-19-2020 10:45 PM


Someone please help me out. While I understand the relationship between volts, amp, watts, It seems to me that something in the above doesn t compute. The specs say that the unit has a capacity of 40 amps. Yet only accommodates a 1/2hp 240v motor. 40 amps X 240v = 9600 watts. Even if you cut that in half to allow for motor inefficiency and start-up load, it seems to me that you still have capacity to run a motor in the neighborhood of 5 hp. Please don t get too technical. I m obviously not an engineer.

- bilyo

The issue with the HP rating is the ability to turn the motor off. When you turn off an induction motor there s an inductive “kick” that causes a fat arc. That arc blasts metal off the contacts.

The HP rating deals with the spacing between the contacts and the thickness of the contacts. Wider spacing snuffs the arc sooner, thus removing less material, and thicker contacts tolerate more material removal.

At rated HP the switch will reach it s rated life. Lower HP longer life. Higher HP shorter life.

And before you ask, no, I don t know what the life rating is for that relay. ;-)

- clagwell


Interesting. I had no idea that was an issue. In an effort to understand it better, I found this site:

https://electrical-engineering-portal.com/contactor-as-an-important-part-of-the-motor-control-gear

where I found this statement: “The method of arc control is also critical in determining the performance of the contactor. Generally, smaller a.c. contactors of up to 22kW rating do not require complex arc chamber design – the combination of the natural current zeros of the a.c. supply and the ‘stretching’ of the arc by the opening of the contacts gives adequate performance.”

Does this have any bearing on the contactors we are discussing?

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