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Forum topic by Rayndeigh posted 04-14-2020 09:03 PM 734 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rayndeigh

12 posts in 78 days


04-14-2020 09:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question project

My husband and I are building a climbing wall and we seem to have vastly overestimated our ability to cut wood at an angle so that it will lay flush. Is there any way to fix this? Could we use a construction adhesive /gap filler and then an additional piece of wood to patch this by screwing it on over the spaces?

Thank you so much


37 replies so far

View Tim Lanier's profile

Tim Lanier

12 posts in 502 days


#1 posted 04-14-2020 11:42 PM

It’s hard to tell just by looking at the closeups but I’d be concerned with the overall structural integrity of that wall. Looks a little shaky to me. I don’t think I’d trust those little metal plates if that’s all that’s going to be holding the boards together while you’re hanging off of them. Maybe you’ve already done this but I think you should show your project plans to someone with some design expertise to see if this is structurally sound design.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1351 posts in 1355 days


#2 posted 04-14-2020 11:58 PM

Thru bolts are called for, not screws or splicing plates.

You might want to use something better than #2 common. Knots have little flex strength.

A bevel gauge and more care when cutting will help. A better design will help more.

Lap joints will add wracking resistence.

Make sure your homeowners policy is up to date before letting others use this.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View LesB's profile

LesB

2550 posts in 4210 days


#3 posted 04-15-2020 12:36 AM

Those plates pictures are not intended for this purpose. Also construction adhesive will not work here.
Are you covering the face with something? 3/4” plywood per chance. That would reinforce everything if properly secured to the framing. That would probably be your best option.

You could over lap over the joints with 3/4 ” plywood plates on both sides through bolted to the 2X4s or get some metal strong ties (1/8” steel plates) and add them on both sides and bolt together.

Lap joints would have been a better approach but for what your are constructing they might still need bracing unless you face it with the plywood mentioned above.

Good luck.

-- Les B, Oregon

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JohnMcClure

1014 posts in 1407 days


#4 posted 04-15-2020 12:43 AM

This could be interesting. A general idea of what you are doing would help.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3139 posts in 2261 days


#5 posted 04-15-2020 12:55 AM

+1 All of the above.

What angles did the plans call for?

Watching.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View homestd's profile

homestd

11 posts in 661 days


#6 posted 04-15-2020 02:07 AM

Plans and pictures please…

-- Mother is the necessity of most invention.

View Rayndeigh's profile

Rayndeigh

12 posts in 78 days


#7 posted 04-15-2020 04:07 AM

Here’s what we actually have so far

We were going for a modified version of this at a 21 degree angle and with the different supports you see in my version. The climbing surface, which is good quality 3/4 in plywood, will be 8×10.

Would using spare plywood over the joints work to secure it? We are also thinking of changing the design to something more simple, even though it means losing the work we’ve done.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3325 posts in 4204 days


#8 posted 04-15-2020 04:57 AM

The plywood plates mentioned above would be what I’d do.

Lots of ways to do it. But, to keep what you’ve got. Remove the metal cleats and replace them with triangles of 1/2” or 3/4” plywood.

Just put a square of plywood, maybe a foot square at along the side of the top corner and trace it. then cut it out, lay in along the outside (or inside) of the wood and use a few deck screws to secure it. Do the same with the other joints.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Rayndeigh's profile

Rayndeigh

12 posts in 78 days


#9 posted 04-15-2020 05:33 AM

To make sure I’m understanding what you’re suggesting – you’re basically saying that we can use plywood cut as you suggest in place of the plates that are currently attached and that that will be strong enough to connect the two 2×6s, despite the space between them?

And that would be strong enough to support my husband and I climbing on it? He weighs more than me (170ish lbs), but I’m the climber of the house, so I’d (140ish lbs) be jumping around on it more. We can definitely do the same thing on the other side as well, if it’ll hold.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

1014 posts in 1407 days


#10 posted 04-15-2020 10:35 AM

Yes, use spare plywood to cover the joints in your triangles. It’ll hold.
I’m more worried about the triangles “toeing out” once theres weight on the system. Need to be smart about attaching them to the climbing wall. But you’ll get there – keep doing what you are doing, have fun, learn.
Looks fun.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3325 posts in 4204 days


#11 posted 04-15-2020 12:01 PM



To make sure I m understanding what you re suggesting – you re basically saying that we can use plywood cut as you suggest in place of the plates that are currently attached and that that will be strong enough to connect the two 2×6s, despite the space between them?

And that would be strong enough to support my husband and I climbing on it? He weighs more than me (170ish lbs), but I m the climber of the house, so I d (140ish lbs) be jumping around on it more. We can definitely do the same thing on the other side as well, if it ll hold.

- Rayndeigh

Before roof trusses were mad in a factory we used to make them with the corners braced with plywood. Plywood is made of laminated sheets glued together with the grain of each layer going at right angles to the previous layer. It has very high shear strength. Make sure the triangles are large enough to brace the corners.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1038 posts in 3266 days


#12 posted 04-15-2020 03:02 PM

Make big triangles as shown by ‘Craftsman on the lake’.
Glue them with PVA glue and screw them before the glue sets. The screws will act as clamps

Put also one where the bracing meets the upright.
Choose plywood with at least 5 ply.

interesting resource:
https://serges-peladeau.wixsite.com/tecniques-sceniques

look for “mouchoirs” in “diaporamas” (it is in French language)

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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Sylvain

1038 posts in 3266 days


#13 posted 04-15-2020 03:14 PM

Perfect meeting of the pieces doesn’t seem to be necessary.
However, you might want to try this technique:
Pass a hand saw between the two surfaces as shown in this boat building technique:
http://blog.douglasbrooksboatbuilding.com/2019/04/2019-bates-college-short-term.html

look at second and third picture where the students saw between the two horizontal boards

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5374 posts in 2154 days


#14 posted 04-15-2020 03:42 PM

With a quick scan through the replies I did not see where anyone addressed your original question about making accurate angled cuts. You didn’t say what tool you are using to make your cuts? Are you cutting by hand, circular saw, miter saw, table saw, something else? If your measurements are correct, you should be able to get a flush joint, which will help make the joints (with the plates recommended above) stronger. A miter saw would probably be the easiest to use, especially if your angles are odd ones that are not easy to layout without a very good protractor or a good understanding of how to use a framing square to do it.

Also, IMO a better and probably simpler approach would be to make the wall by framing the rectangle with your 2×4s (or are those 2×6s?), attaching the plywood skin (lots of screws with a bead of construction adhesive on each stud) and then attaching the wall to the angled support legs. Note: before attaching the plywood face, make sure that it is square by measuring the diagonals

BTW, assuming that wall is 8’ wide and 10’ tall, you can save yourself some cutting by turning the plywood sheets sideways instead of vertically. Only one cut required to cut the 2’ piece to put at the top or bottom

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Rayndeigh's profile

Rayndeigh

12 posts in 78 days


#15 posted 04-15-2020 03:52 PM

That is exactly our plan for the plywood, which is why I have extra plywood to use for the triangles – the second half of the 3rd piece is just lying on my floor right now. The rest of it is t-nutted and ready to go. We used a circular saw to cut the wood. My husband is a math guy, so I’m confident that our measurements are correct. He also seems to understand how to use the protractor and square, but it’s possible that the protractor isn’t very good (it was definitely one of the cheaper ones at the store). My guess is still that we just aren’t that great at applying all of our conceptual know-how. The question at this point is really whether the fixes suggested here will salvage what we’ve already got safely, or if we should scrap it entirely.

showing 1 through 15 of 37 replies

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