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Forum topic by Dustjunkie posted 04-12-2020 03:44 PM 1002 views 1 time favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dustjunkie

39 posts in 380 days


04-12-2020 03:44 PM

I am looking to replace my blade on the Delta 36-725 table saw, are there any suggestions for an all around blade ?


49 replies so far

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1388 posts in 2655 days


#1 posted 04-12-2020 03:53 PM

NONE. All around blades do everything so-so, but nothing well. Of them, the Ridge Carbide is tops.
BUT, for a LOT less money, you can get a Diablo 24 tooth rip and 60 tooth crosscut, Between the two, you can do everything better than any combo blade.

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JackDuren

1459 posts in 1966 days


#2 posted 04-12-2020 04:13 PM

You need to find a budget to find a blade. There are a lot of discussions in search…

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CaptainKlutz

4127 posts in 2500 days


#3 posted 04-12-2020 04:21 PM

If you don’t care about quality of cut, then every blade is ‘all around blade’?
Buy what ever you can afford and live with results. :)

BUT:
If you want perfect cut edges, then you have to use the blade designed for specific purpose.

There is a massive amount of information available in LJ forums on this topic, Suggest you search and save us all the time it takes to type it all over again?

Here is good reference to get you started:
Tips for Picking Saw Blades, Blog entry by knotscott

IMHO – Saw blades are like toothpaste, everyone likes a different brand and flavor, as they all have different needs.

Many folks rant/rave about most expensive blades from Forest or Ridge. I can get Leitz industrial saw blades from my local sharpener, and they have exact same geometry for half the price.
IME the Forest Woodworker II and Ridge Carbide 2000 edges dull really quick, and the universal geometry they sell, comes at price of much more frequent sharpening. Most home hobby shops don’t cut hundreds/thousands of bdft per week, so hobbyist think they are fantastic? I think they a average at best? Everyone is right, once you understand the big picture.

If want cheap saw blades, HF Admiral combo blade for $21 works fine. Costs more to have it sharpened, than it does buy a new one when it gets dull. For hobby shop or weekend wood worker, it works fine.

If you want best edge on plywood, you must have plywood blade. Be prepared to clean them often, as they cut like crap dull blade when they are dirty. Man made woods leave behind a lot of pitch on blades.

The above is just a taste of what you can learn by searching the forums for saw blade information.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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therealSteveN

7221 posts in 1580 days


#4 posted 04-12-2020 05:52 PM

I usually start on this subject wondering if your saw is a Left tilt? Seems a lot of the world has gone to them.

I’ll not argue that individual blades for Rip, Crosscut, Plywood, will always give the best results, they do.

That said, a lot of the world has also gone to a “combo blade” using just one blade to do all of your cutting. A combo blade is something of an answer to all the folks who went and got a Left tilt saw.

IF you use the cursor on your fence to determine where to move your fence to, AND you have a left tilt saw, and you SYNC in the setting so you are dead on perfect. Then perhaps you should be using a combo blade. WHY you ask? On a left tilter, your blade thickness is going to determine where the cut line is. So with a combo blade that NEVER moves, or changes, and will allow that reading you are making to be dead on. IF you swap blades, and invariably get different thicknesses of a saw plate, your cut line will also change. So then you will have inaccurate cuts, maybe slight, but if group up enough of them, you start seeing non square assemblies.

So with a left tilt saw, your best bet is to use a combo blade, because any flaw in your cut will be better than having inaccurate cuts.

If you have a right tilter, like I have, swap away, and enjoy the best quality cut you can get. But if you do swap, you need to pay attention to which blade is in, or you’ll find crosscuts with a 24 tooth ripper, are as bad, probably worse than with a combo blade.

One of the BIGGEST thoughts to be sure about from Scott’s well written blog, that Capn K listed is to make darn sure your blade is not thinner than your splitter, Riving Knife, or your wood will not pass, at all, or partially. Both can be huge safety concerns.

A pretty good piece on blade thickness, and splitter size is below.

https://www.thesharkguard.com/how-to-determine-splitter-or-riving-knife-thickness/

-- Think safe, be safe

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Tony_S

1424 posts in 4089 days


#5 posted 04-12-2020 05:55 PM

http://carbideprocessors.com/tenryu/gold-medal-all-purpose/

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

3159 posts in 1610 days


#6 posted 04-12-2020 06:17 PM

That is a more opened ended question than you could imagine. If you want only one blade for ripping and crosscutting then buy a 24-40 tooth combination blade. Home Depot sells Diablo or Lowes sells Marples. Both good budget blades for weekend warriors.

You’re gonna get a bunch of suggestions.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1388 posts in 2655 days


#7 posted 04-12-2020 06:25 PM

A $30 Diablo rip blade will do a better job ripping than a $140 multi-purpose. ( tried them) Add a $40 Diablo crosscut, and you’re in business. I can see, if a contractor on-site where who knows what you are going to cut, the multi-purpose is fine as you are not going to spend time on the clock changing blades. The difference between a Fusion or Ridge when I switched to a 24 tooth Diablo was night and day. With a contractor size, stick with thin kerf. When I upgrade to a 3 HP, I will re-evaluate my expensive Ridge Carbide super-blade.

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Madmark2

2274 posts in 1594 days


#8 posted 04-12-2020 07:18 PM

Freud LU83 thin kerf combo blades are smooth as silk.

They’re only $60 or so, not worth resharpening.

I cut a lot of exotic hardwoods with it.

Their teeth are sharpened not only on top but on the sides for superior finish. It gives a glue line rip and glassy crosscut.

Thin kerf effectively adds 25% to your saw HP by reducing the load. Cuts comparable to Forrest WW-II but for 1/2 the price.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View hcbph_1's profile

hcbph_1

92 posts in 320 days


#9 posted 04-12-2020 08:03 PM

I have several high end rip, crosscut and plywood blades and most are carbide tipped. Happens the other year I was sawing some reclaimed wood and even though I had used a metal detector on the wood I was still a little worried of hitting something that was missed. I stumbled onto one of those diamonds in the rough at HF. I picked up a 60 tooth carbide blade, and funny that once the job was done I haven’t had a lot of reason to take it off the saw.
Most of my cutting is ripping hardwood up to about 1.25” and it does well, same with crosscutting. I’ve glued up a lot of wood straight out of the saw without issues. I even cut the occasional 3/4” piece of plywood successfully. Little to no tearout with it.
IIRC the blade was something like $20 or less at the time and I’m happy with it overall.

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LeeRoyMan

1533 posts in 733 days


#10 posted 04-12-2020 08:17 PM

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JackDuren

1459 posts in 1966 days


#11 posted 04-12-2020 08:29 PM

What does the OP want to pay?

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JackDuren

1459 posts in 1966 days


#12 posted 04-12-2020 08:31 PM


http://carbideprocessors.com/tenryu/gold-medal-all-purpose/

- Tony_S

By far, my favorite blades.

- LeeRoyMan

I have gold medal but get equal results from Amana. I think once your in the premium blades they all work pretty good..

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BurlyBob

8472 posts in 3272 days


#13 posted 04-12-2020 08:41 PM

That’s like which is better Ford or Chevy?

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Tony_S

1424 posts in 4089 days


#14 posted 04-12-2020 11:00 PM


http://carbideprocessors.com/tenryu/gold-medal-all-purpose/

- Tony_S

By far, my favorite blades.

- LeeRoyMan

Best I’ve ever used….but what the hell do we know.
Tenryu vs. Freud? There isn’t even a comparison.

I have gold medal but get equal results from Amana. I think once your in the premium blades they all work pretty good..

- JackDuren

Could be. A lot of professionals use them. I’ve never used an Amana saw blade. I tried some of their router bits and wasn’t really impressed. They were hit and miss, so I never ventured into the saw blades.
I tend to agree with you on the premium blades though. There’s a lot of good ones out there now.
Royce Ayr and Tenryu dominate my shop though.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View Dustjunkie's profile

Dustjunkie

39 posts in 380 days


#15 posted 04-12-2020 11:22 PM

So I see this was an open book question, I should have known better. The blades from Carbide Processors look good and the reviews are good.

Budget wise I am probably looking at $50-60, maybe the Marples might be a good one.

BurlyBob, a RAM is better than a Chevy or Ford (LOL)

I did read the blog from knotscott, very interesting and informative.

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