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UltraSharp diamond stones?

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Forum topic by jspill posted 04-11-2020 02:34 PM 494 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jspill

12 posts in 3122 days


04-11-2020 02:34 PM

I am thinking of purchasing a set of three UltraSharp diamond stones. The grits are 300, 600, 1200. In the past I have used sandpaper on glass, water stones, Tormek, and Worksharp to sharpen plane blades and chisels. I have never used a diamond stone. My plan is to use the 600 and then 1200 followed by a treated leather strop. I have had good success with the Tormek and Worksharp machines. I just think using diamond stones would speed up the process. So, what do you think? Are you familiar with UltraSharp diamond stones? They are much cheaper than DMT diamond stones. I would just like to have more info. before I purchase. Thanks.

-- jspill


13 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3187 posts in 2607 days


#1 posted 04-11-2020 03:51 PM

All the diamond sharpening stuff I have bought pretty much head down the same path. They start out great cutting fast but quickly lose their sharpness.
Just to be clear I have some bonded to plastic,bonded to glass and bonded to bronze. The one just fir tool steel wear out the fastest.
Your setup with the tormek is what I consider to be the best. Hollow grind then free hand on sone nice water stones.
I use Shapton but there’s plenty of other that just fine.
I also use the side sharpening method and consider it to be the best and easiest to learn.
No on the leather strop

Good Luck

-- Aj

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1008 posts in 2458 days


#2 posted 04-11-2020 04:04 PM

Research them carefully. The type of crystal and type of binding matters. Some may be just as good, some , like the diamond stoned at Horrible Freight don’t last much longer than wet/dry. There are several good videos on the subject.

1200 is not fine enough to go to a strop. 3000 is more like it.

I now have a worksharp. I used to flatten on a hingra, but want to get a course diamond stone. I use my 600/1200 DMT on the backs. Then move to the Worksharp. up to 3000, then strop. Only for chisels though. I stop at 1200 for planes as I don’t think the extra does anything the first foot of use does not take away.

Everyone has their preferences though.

View Wintergreen78's profile

Wintergreen78

96 posts in 548 days


#3 posted 04-11-2020 04:19 PM

A 600 diamond stone followed by 1200 followed by a strop will work fine. I use a hard black oil stone for polishing after the 1200 and a block of maple with green rouge instead of a strop, but I think either approach will work. If I have something in really rough shape and the 600 isn’t aggressive enough, I use sandpaper on a granite block.

I use the DMT stones. They are about $50 each, so $100 total and you know they will work. You could try the other ones. If they work out you could save $20-$30. If not, you can buy something else.

View hkmiller's profile

hkmiller

236 posts in 890 days


#4 posted 04-11-2020 05:34 PM

I would look at the trend brand according to their website they have a unique way of bonding the diamond to the substrate

-- always something

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

1008 posts in 2458 days


#5 posted 04-11-2020 05:46 PM

Well yea, a black is a lot finer than 1200! About 4000.


A 600 diamond stone followed by 1200 followed by a strop will work fine. I use a hard black oil stone for polishing after the 1200 and a block of maple with green rouge instead of a strop, but I think either approach will work. If I have something in really rough shape and the 600 isn’t aggressive enough, I use sandpaper on a granite block.

I use the DMT stones. They are about $50 each, so $100 total and you know they will work. You could try the other ones. If they work out you could save $20-$30. If not, you can buy something else.

- Wintergreen78


View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8920 posts in 3386 days


#6 posted 04-11-2020 05:55 PM

Atoma diamond plates work the best.

View Mr_Pink's profile

Mr_Pink

196 posts in 1180 days


#7 posted 04-11-2020 11:42 PM

I have the Ultrasharp plates, and they’re fine. I can compare them to the Eze-lap and DMT, and I don’t think there’s a noticeable difference in quality. All of them will wear out. Once they do, you have a nice steel lapping plate.

Fwiw, I use a water stone (Arashiyama 6000) between the finest diamond plate and the strop.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

680 posts in 1557 days


#8 posted 04-12-2020 01:59 AM

I do pretty much the same as Wintergreen78. I used to go from the 1200 diamond stone to the leather strop and rouge, and it worked just fine. But, I had a nice black Arkansas stone, so put that between the diamond stone and the strop, and it worked ‘just finer’.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

3374 posts in 2303 days


#9 posted 04-12-2020 04:41 PM

+1 Atoma stay sharper longer than DMT for me.

+1 Once the sharp edges on diamonds are gone, they cut slower than all the other methods you have used.

You don’t tell us what kind of steel you want sharpen?

IMHO – You will use the new diamond stones for couple of months, see them cutting slower and slower; and end up going back to other methods you already own. IME – It will be waste of money, unless you have some specific sharpening reason you think you need diamond plates to get job done?

BTW – If you water stones are cutting too slow, could be the brand. Try some Sigma II Selects or Shapton. FWW did a comparison on water stones, and there is huge difference in cut speed between brands, especially on harder tool steel. Based on your sharpening tool collection, would think you already know this, but posted it to make sure.

Best Luck.

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

View jspill's profile

jspill

12 posts in 3122 days


#10 posted 04-12-2020 05:15 PM

Thank you for the replies. It seems Ultrasharp are comparable to DMT diamond stones. Atoma was twice mentioned as being superior to both. I was surprised to read several folks said diamond stones wear down fast causing sharpening to go slower. I was under the impression that diamond stones last longer and sharpen plane blades and chisels faster than water stones.

-- jspill

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8920 posts in 3386 days


#11 posted 04-12-2020 05:30 PM

Sharp is awesome and LJers shorten the learning curve.

Atomas, water stones, PSA from Tools for working wood, Tormek, it’s all good and the journey
is a fun one.

Sigma II Selects or Shapton are on my radar as well good stuff.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

3187 posts in 2607 days


#12 posted 04-12-2020 06:59 PM



Thank you for the replies. It seems Ultrasharp are comparable to DMT diamond stones. Atoma was twice mentioned as being superior to both. I was surprised to read several folks said diamond stones wear down fast causing sharpening to go slower. I was under the impression that diamond stones last longer and sharpen plane blades and chisels faster than water stones.

- jspill

They do at first. The little pointy tips of the diamond brake off and leave you with nothing to refresh. With a water stone you can refresh the surface when it becomes loaded with metal particles. For instance on my Shapton I can rough up the surface several different ways.
Very similar to grading the wheel on a tormek.
Hope this makes sense.
Good Luck

-- Aj

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

529 posts in 195 days


#13 posted 04-12-2020 07:18 PM

I personally don’t care for diamond stones for sharpening generally speaking. Things don’t get sharp enough for me. I do use a DMT for flattening my Waterstones though.

-- Darrel

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