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Best finish for restoring Silky Oak antique chair??

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Forum topic by EskimoChain posted 04-09-2020 03:37 PM 592 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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EskimoChain

1 post in 606 days


04-09-2020 03:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: silky oak shellac beeswax sandpaper sanding finishing antique

Hi all, do people have any suggestions on the best finish for the silky Oak antique chair that I am restoring? I have experience working with timber but never with silky Oak, which I know is quite a thirsty timber. I have begun sanding and used a 120 (it has pretty bad grime build up) and will finish with 400. Initially I was just going to use bees wax but I am guessing shellac will give me more of the finish I want, I would rather avoid polyurethanes etc if I can. As a framer I would normally finish Ramin timber with a couple of coats of shellac followed by a finishing coat of beeswax, which works nicely on the hard wood but I am not sure if this is the best approach with Silky Oak??? Any suggestions/advice on finishing are much appreciated. Cheers


2 replies so far

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LesB

3144 posts in 4732 days


#1 posted 04-09-2020 04:31 PM

I think what your are doing; ” I would normally finish …......with a couple of coats of shellac followed by a finishing coat of beeswax,...” should work well. I would substitute carnauba wax for the beeswax because it produces a harder finish.

Your other choice would be a hand applied finishing compound composed of a combination of oils, wax, and shellac. I don’t know what their commercial brand names would be in Australia but you could research and make your own.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Phil32

1613 posts in 1192 days


#2 posted 04-09-2020 06:47 PM

Is your objective to have the original appearance that it had as a silky oak antique chair? Or, do you want a durable, non-yellowing, semi-glossy protection of a beautiful grain figure? You decide.

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

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