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Forum topic by TheJET posted 04-07-2020 04:47 PM 441 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheJET

4 posts in 535 days


04-07-2020 04:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: black walnut resaw lumber walnut

All, this is my first post. I am a novice without access to a mill or large bandsaw. I will most likely have to use my chainsaw to resaw initially. I recently received numerous black walnut cast of cuts from a tree removed within the last 3 days. It was all free! They range from 18” in length to 24” in length and from 8” round to approximately 24” around. I am unsure of what I will use the lumber for once cut but I want to leave my options open. I want to leave the possibilities open for leaving it as large as possible while properly preserving to prevent waste, rot and checking. I am opening this up to suggestions. What would you do? Sorry no pictures yet. Thanks! Jeff


13 replies so far

View them700project's profile

them700project

238 posts in 1755 days


#1 posted 04-07-2020 05:15 PM

Alaskan Sawmill

View Walker's profile

Walker

352 posts in 1209 days


#2 posted 04-07-2020 05:25 PM

Got a Froe and a mallet?

-- ~Walker

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BattleRidge

149 posts in 952 days


#3 posted 04-07-2020 05:58 PM

The first thing I would do is coat each end with Anchorseal (1 would be the best, but Anchorseal 2 can be used and seems to be more available in the store). There are some alternatives and more ‘homemade’ options, but Anchroseal is designed specifically for the purpose. Sealing the ends will help limit or prevent splitting from uneven drying.

-- ~Art~

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

2031 posts in 2920 days


#4 posted 04-07-2020 06:00 PM

First off, get them off the ground and paint the ends to prevent checking.

Since they’re so short, I recommend looking into a bandsaw mill sled and finding a larger bandsaw. I just the other day found a bunch of short walnut logs cut down by the city that I milled up. I first removed the bark with a drawknife. A large chisel or axe will work, too.


I knocked this simple one sled out in less than an hour with plywood and some decking screws. I used a long F clamp to push the end of the log against the screws that go through the back plate. It rides in the miter slot in my bandsaw.

The kerf waste from a chainsaw mill in a 8” x 18” log is pretty substantial.

The cheaper blood, sweat, tears route is a large frame saw, which will make you swole but keep more usable wood than a chainsaw and cost less than a bandsaw. Best of luck.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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Steve

1979 posts in 1319 days


#5 posted 04-07-2020 08:36 PM

I got a bunch of cherry shorts and took them to a local bandsaw mill to be cut up.

Now that I have a larger bandsaw, I’d be tempted to build a sled like what’s posted above

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2829 posts in 2582 days


#6 posted 04-07-2020 08:41 PM



First off, get them off the ground and paint the ends to prevent checking.

Since they re so short, I recommend looking into a bandsaw mill sled and finding a larger bandsaw. I just the other day found a bunch of short walnut logs cut down by the city that I milled up. I first removed the bark with a drawknife. A large chisel or axe will work, too.

I knocked this simple one sled out in less than an hour with plywood and some decking screws. I used a long F clamp to push the end of the log against the screws that go through the back plate. It rides in the miter slot in my bandsaw.

The kerf waste from a chainsaw mill in a 8” x 18” log is pretty substantial.

The cheaper blood, sweat, tears route is a large frame saw, which will make you swole but keep more usable wood than a chainsaw and cost less than a bandsaw. Best of luck.

- shampeon


Is it important to get the bark off? Eyeing large stack of Beech logs to cut up for wife to turn.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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therealSteveN

5583 posts in 1311 days


#7 posted 04-07-2020 08:43 PM


Got a Froe and a mallet?

- Walker

For shorts it is a very expedient method. Plus cheapest of all the possibles if you don’t have logging tools, or a desire to own them.

Plus it is a speed course in teaching you how to determine how the grain flows. Extremely educational.

-- Think safe, be safe

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shampeon

2031 posts in 2920 days


#8 posted 04-07-2020 08:54 PM

I remove the bark to keep any insects from hiding, and because the bark holds a lot of dirt and rocks, and maybe can hide a nail. Don’t want any of that dulling my bandsaw blade. A lot of people leave the bark, but it’s relatively cheap insurance, to me. I find it’s easier to remove the bark when it’s wet, too. It peels off pretty quickly with my drawknife.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View TheJET's profile

TheJET

4 posts in 535 days


#9 posted 04-08-2020 01:56 AM

Thanks to everyone for all of the suggestions! I will definately seal the ends and remove the bark. An Alaskan chainsaw mill may be in the works as a larger bandsaw or mobile bandsaw services are not in the budget. Hopefully I will be able to post some before and after pictures soon.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5218 posts in 2124 days


#10 posted 04-08-2020 03:54 AM

It seems like an Alaskan chainsaw mill would be difficult to use on only 18-24” long logs. I think that I would try something like the John Heisz vertical chainsaw mill. Simple to make and looks like he got pretty good results.

A good way to reduce the amount of cracking you get from short logs like this without completely milling them into slabs or boards now, is to cut about a 2” slab lengthwise out of the middle to remove the pith from the log. I do this with green bowl blanks that I find. By removing the middle rings from the log, cracking is usually significantly less, especially if you also coat the end grain of the remaining half logs. BTW, while you are at it, go ahead and remove the pith from that center slab and you will be left 2 nice 2” quarter sawn boards that will be pretty stable as they dry.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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TheJET

4 posts in 535 days


#11 posted 04-08-2020 09:47 AM

The vertical is a pretty cool idea! Thanks for the suggestions. It looks like I will have to do a combination of most of the suggestion, letting the individual log dictate what it needs. Thanks!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

13556 posts in 1875 days


#12 posted 04-08-2020 01:11 PM

For pieces that size, I would seal the ends, split them across the pith with a froe or chainsaw and seal the cut faces then sticker them up out of the elements and direct sunlight to dry. That’s how I generally get best results for turning stock with the least amount of checking. I leave the bark on while it dries then when I’m ready to cut it down to turning blanks or boards, strip the bark and go at it with the chainsaw or bandsaw. Good advice from Ian if you want to shorten your drying time and maintain good, useable stock.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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TheJET

4 posts in 535 days


#13 posted 04-08-2020 01:31 PM

Thank you!

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